Strike or time to grow up! - page 2

I hear so much talk about striking that it scares me to think that there are so many people who would abandon their patients so easily. Maybe in some cases where safety is an issue I could consider... Read More

  1. by   fiestynurse
    Thanks for the clarification Dplear. I was not understanding the differences between military nursing and civilian nursing.
  2. by   JenKatt
    I also am active duty Air Force and a nurse. I work on a very common unit for the military, an MSU ( Multi Service Unit). We take everyone. We have the capablitlies to take anyone from newborns who ahve gone home and come back to geriatrics who are dying. The only patients we can't take are ICU aptients and anyone requiring cardiac monitoring. I am on a fixed salary. I've worked 18 hour shifts. Three days straight. My boss will stay and help, he'll work 5 12's in a row if he has too. I work nights, even though I ahte it and it totally screws my family, because I have too. If I get told tomorrow I ahve to go to the Family Practice Clinic tomorrow and give up patient care totally and do telephone triage, I will because I have too. Military Nursing can really suck.
    Having said that, I remember civialina nursing. At least in the miltiary, I get leave, and sick days. My health care is apid for. If my boss is a total jacka$$ I can do something about it and see the results. But the pay still sucks. I took almost a 12 grand cut in pay, I don't pay federal taxes, but I've lost a lot of freedom. My recruiter told me I could do Peds/ NICU, but I'm doing Med Surg. On the other hand, my ACLS, PALS, NRP and every other cert I can think of will be paid for or free.
    Nurse's need to be able to strike. Hospitals get a 10 day notice of a strike. They are the ones who can do something about it, we can't be stepped on any more.

    Oh as for not having anything to do. Bull. you can clean up. You can find stuff to do. Even our "healthy" population needs teaching, care etc. You make stuff to do so you aren't surfing the net all day and night. Since I've been on nights, I've redone our Work Activity Sheets, report sheets, reorganized the med room, stocked the med room every night, stocked empty aptients rooms, consoled our patients and helped out in the ER. There's no such thing as having nothing to do. It's how much you want to do. I choose to earn my money.
  3. by   -jt
    Jt, it is called Military Nursing. You are a member of the armed forces and you do what they tell you end of argumnet.

    ok as long as he knows he better not do that out here in the real world. (I didnt see that he said he was in the military.)
  4. by   Dplear
    Please forgive my TERRIBLE typing on these cheap small keyboards at work..I will try better next time...
  5. by   RNforLongTime
    Hmmmmm....let's see here. Reasons to Strike. Number one on my list is Mandatory Overime! It is unfair and unsafe for the PATIENT to have a nurse care for them for 16 hours straight! That is probably THE biggest reason that our union might be going on strike come November first--if it comes to that. I don't want to strike but if that is what it is going to take for administration to sit up and take notice then so be it. Oh and did I mention the fact that I'm not going to be able to take a weeks vacation this summer because there aren't enough nurses to cover it! And how about the fact that I rarely if ever get a lunch break during an 8 hour shift.

    I feel terrible that I am not able to spend time and sit and talk with my patients during an 8 hour shift. Somedays I feel like a bad nurse because I wasn't able to give the care that the patients deserve but just the bare minimum of nurse-patient interaction.

    I have NEVER had time to surf the internet while at work!!! And there could have been SOMETHING for you to do Jared rather than surf the net!! Let me know where you work cause I want a job there!!!

    Kelly
  6. by   majic65
    Dear Jared, Military or civilian, you are giving perinatal/L&D nurses a bad name! It is people like you who lead other nursing staff to think that OB/postpartum/antepatum is the "easy" place to work--Ihave heard that over and over in my 18 years as an OB nurse!
    Let me tell you one important thing--while you are sitting on your butt surfing the web, there are patients and their newly-created families who need teaching, support, comfort, etc. Your post leads me to believe that you are probably one of those nurses who got "assigned" to OB and see that assignment as a license to sit on your butt and do nothing. Of course, if that is the case, your teaching skills are probably pretty limited, too--they don't get any use!!!
    Please--in the interest of nursing as a whole--when your military career is up, seek other employment. You do not sound like the kind of person who will ever do anything to benefit nursing or your patients.
  7. by   fergus51
    Originally posted by -jt:
    <STRONG>Hey Fergus......just wondering what you must be thinking about all the nurses who so eagerly jump the strike lines of other nurses here in the good ole USA - land of opportunity. Are you amazed that American nurses wont even stand together to fight the evils that they ALL have in common nation-wide? We must be a laughing stock to your nation of all-for-one nurses who would never cross each others strike lines. Some of us should be ashamed of ourselves, huh?</STRONG>
    I worked in the US for a couple of years and nothing surprises me anymore. Nurses here are suprisingly united. We just voted 97% to reject the latest contract where the highest paid nurses would be paid about 22$ US, call in would no longer be based on seniority (so they can have a shift full of new grads to save money) and no designated days off for part-timers. Who in their right mind would think this is a great contract?

    We haven't had a real raise in ten years and we wonder why we can't keep nurses in the province. Hmmm...I think I know why they're leaving. They can make more money and have more educational opportunities in the US. For instance, new grads here can not go into ICU, PAR, OR, L&D. OB, ER, etc. unless they have taken post graduate certificate studies. It would take about a year to complete the course for L&D.

    I have NEVER heard a nurse talk about undermining our efforts because they understand that in the long run it would hurt the profession. I don't know why scab nurses don't have this foresight. The "I got mine so screw you" attitude is far too common among nurses. Nurses here are VERY aware that the shortage is hitting us harder than in a lot of places and us working overtime is just a bandaid solution. We are stretched to the limit. We desperately need to recruit and retain nurses or there will be no one left to care for patients. In order to do that we need to be competitive with the US.
    ps
    JT- there is no way a nurse can cross a picket line here because the whole province is one union. And other nurses from across Canada couldn't come and replace us because you have to be a union member to work here, not that I think they would anyway. Nurses have been very supportive of Alberta and Quebec nurses who were forced to strike.
  8. by   fergus51
    By the way, can anyone tell me why the gov't can pay double time for a TON of OT (up to 52$ CND), rather than just pay a decent wage (like 40 CND) and have enough nurses so that we wouldn't have to work OT? This is the idiocy we face with our employer who will continue to keep nurses salaries and working conditions so bad that they will flee the province for the US until the nurses left here are unable to continue to care for all the patients.
  9. by   -jt
    "This is the idiocy we face with our employer who will continue to keep nurses salaries and working conditions so bad that they will flee the province for the US until the nurses left here are unable to continue to care for all the patients."


    Maybe they figure that when those nurses get here, the joke will be on them - cause all they will find is more of the same conditions - just a different currency.
    We're all in the same boat, Ferg.... I just wish the American nurses would take a long look at their northern peers in Canada & learn something about standing together to effect change. But I wont be holding my breath.
    Thanks so much for your post.
  10. by   fergus51
    Originally posted by -jt:
    <STRONG>"This is the idiocy we face with our employer who will continue to keep nurses salaries and working conditions so bad that they will flee the province for the US until the nurses left here are unable to continue to care for all the patients."


    Maybe they figure that when those nurses get here, the joke will be on them - cause all they will find is more of the same conditions - just a different currency.
    We're all in the same boat, Ferg.... I just wish the American nurses would take a long look at their northern peers in Canada & learn something about standing together to effect change. But I wont be holding my breath.
    Thanks so much for your post.</STRONG>
    While the problems of working consitions are the same in the States ( I felt like a sweat shop worker there too), the salary, signing bonuses, retention bonuses and tuition reimbursement can not even compare. For a huge number of new grads the idea of bad conditions here for 25K a year can't compare to bad conditions in the US for 40K+. I think it was Dplear who was making 90K or something. The very highest paid nurses in my province make less than half that. I am tempted to return to the States for agency work. A different currency yes, but any way you cut it I was making a LOT more money in the States doing the same job that I am doing here. The only thing keeping me here is a love of my home...and that doesn't pay the bills...
  11. by   RNPD
    I also didn't realuze that Jared is in the military. He therefore has absolutely no business using his experience as a baseline for what staff nurses throughout this country are going through. It's hard to take seriously the opinion of a nurse who has absolutely no idea of what he's talking about.

    But, as for the original post, know this:

    1) Strikes do not happen until all other options have failed. When the hospital refuses to negotiate further, staff can accept their "final offer" or reject it and serve a strike notice. If the "offer" is unsafe and unacceptable, then nurses have an ethical obligation to strike.

    2)"Fighting" about different levels in nursing-and BTW, a CNA is NOT a nurse-has nothing to do with safe staffing and fair wages and practices. They are 2 separate issues.

    3) Patients are never "abandoned". First of all "abandonment" can not occur unless a nurse accepts an assignemtn and then leaves the patients unattended. Striking nurses do not accept a patient assignment and therefore can not abandon them. And secondly, the hospitals by law are given 10 days notice of the intent to strike, giving them time to a) negotiate further, b) arrange to transfer patients to other facilites, or c) inform the union of critical patients who can not be moved and who have no one to care for them so the union can make arrangements to keep some staff on for these criticals.

    4) Of course I want no one to show up when a strike notice is served. It is the only way a hospital can be forced to negotiate.

    5) to say that any nurse wants "to see the patients suffer' is so ludicrous that it doesn't deserve to be addrsssed.

    6) any nurse that feels that he can't find something productive to do during six hours of a 12 hour shift is the one who needs to get out of nursing......
  12. by   kennedyj
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by majic65:
    [qb]Dear Jared, Military or civilian, you are giving perinatal/L&D nurses a bad name! It is people like you who lead other nursing staff to think that OB/postpartum/antepatum is the "easy" place to work--Ihave heard that over and over in my 18 years as an OB nurse!..............................


    OMGoshhh!!!! Ohh uuuhh (here it goes!!!!)))) eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeyyyyyyyyyaaaaaaaaa hahahahahahahahahahahaaa heeeehheeeeheeeeee (rolling out of my chair) hhoohhoooohheeeeheeeheee (hitting the floor)........(short breath)....heeeeheeehhaaahaaaaaa haaaa (rolling on the floor)....hheehheehhehehehe (Turning hypoxic)....hehehehehehehehe ((Stomach starting to hurt))))..hheeehheeee................LMAO, LOL, LMDO..

    Should have checked my email sooner but I have been off work the past few days (you know how it is).....

    I think your bashing words were given a good try but if you would have read the entire post you would have realized that I only surf the web when there isn't anything to do, 2-3 patients on the ward who are sleeping etc....If I woke them up to give a back rub or do teaching The would throw me out.

    Postpartum is ok but not the area I wished to work. As a new nurse the military will not allow me to work in a speciaized area until I have 1 year nursing experience.

    What I have done as a new RN of 9 months:

    ACLS, OB ultrasound, Fetal Heart monitoring, PALS, NRP, CPR Instructor, 15 sem hrs of graduate level courses, began a research study, and more..

    I volunteered through the Red Cross at a military base over 300hrs to become competent in Labor and Delivery.

    I began My masters to be a CNM and WHNP (to add before I even passed my NCLEX exam and 3 weeks out of nursing school) Am 1/4 finished with a 3.85 GPA.

    Last month I paid $2000 and took 4 vacation days to become certified in OB ultrasound- got a 98% on the exam. I worked a 12hr shift then went to the airport and worked a 12 hr shift when I got back.

    I think my knowledge base for teaching is excellent and they get lots of use too. I participate in 5 discussion boards and access ovid and medline type research data bases to use when a rare question arises that I can not answer for a patient. My discharge classes usually last about 30minutes when most nurses are done in less than 10 minutes.

    My patients like me very much and I am often the one people ask for information when problems arise. My name is frequently appriased on the comment cards that patient fill out.

    In my 9 months as a nurse I have been off to a good start (not just academically). What have you done? Strike??

    Have a great day.
    Jared

    [ June 19, 2001: Message edited by: kennedyj ]
  13. by   kennedyj
    Kaka Nurse

    -------
    We are short an RN (Bsn) and I think have a position for 1 LPN also. We are in Kaiserslautern Germany.
    Email me directly or post a private message.
    If you are interested. But you have to remember that striking is forbidden and you can be fired for it (or even penalized under law)
    Jared

    [ June 19, 2001: Message edited by: kennedyj ]

    [ June 19, 2001: Message edited by: kennedyj ]

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