So you hate your job....? - page 2

OK, imagine if you will.... You are a happy person with a good sense of humor but... You're surrounded by unhappy people, in an unhappy environment. There are just enough lazy people and... Read More

  1. by   Noryn
    Have you only been a RN for a year? I thought you had been one longer than that. If you love the ICU then apply at either a staffing agency or another hospital. Take the current administration up on their offer, and go to the other facility.

    The ER is rough, and it is a lot different from the ICU. I think in the ER there is a definite lack of control that you have in the ICU but I also considered it as a controlled chaos.

    But you owe it to yourself to work where you want to. I loved taking care of patients but ultimately hated dealing with corrupt administrations so I left the hospital and honestly am the happiest I have been since becoming a RN.
  2. by   RN Randy
    Hey Noryn, maybe we can meet up at the next BARH roundup.. lol... I hear it may be on the horizon again.

    Anyway, yes, only been an RN for a year. I'm also a respiratory therapist, registered polysomnographic technologist and former paramedic. I got started back in '88 and have enjoyed many a career and many a job. Things didn't start hitting the crapper until I got to the "big dog" facility we all know and love, LOL.
    The 'recruitment/retention' bag-lady said with all that behind my name, she is concerned as to why I have so much trouble keeping a job, and that I'm a 'red flag' to her.

    Sounds like you're well-versed, and know why I want out. It's still the same, not a change, and probably won't change.

    It's not the ER I hate, it's the disorder.... not controlled chaos, that's fun..... I mean the disorder of management gone bad and left to die for 5 years before someone finally decided to fire the bum, and find another manager. Oh, and add in a doctor's wife 'interim' manager in the meantime...
    you know, the final blow... lol

    It's quite a mess.
    rb
    Last edit by RN Randy on Sep 26, '07
  3. by   Noryn
    It is a mess but only your mess if you let it be. There are plenty of options for you, I would definitely try to get on at another hospital in the ICU. Get at least 2-3 years experience and your options are going to be so much broader.

    I can see how an idiot would consider your background a red flag, now once you start dealing with someone with half a brain you will realize that your background makes you a great asset to a hospital.
  4. by   rierie
    If you want to appreciate your job more you may need to move to an area that appreciates you more and where you feel like you can't be replaced. I would consider looking for a MAGNET hospital. I understand working in a rural setting because I have done both, but a large hospital in urban area worked great for me. You may have to relocate to get something you like. Lots of places offer relocation bonuses and if it's an option for you go for it (after some deep research). I felt a great sense of team work when I worked for a facility that was going for MAGNET status. Now you must always consider that places always look great when they are trying to recruit you but keep researching and find a place that won't waste your time by networking here and local message boards. Ask questions about certain facilities on a local board to find out what the employees really think. Not just the nurses but all staff opinions count and that helps you to decide which hospitals have true team players. Hope this helps. Good luck!
  5. by   Medic/Nurse
    I feel your pain. (well, kinda - thankfully we can't ACTUALLY feel the misery via the web...but I can relate!)

    You have choices.
    Accepting that fact - can make this a bit easier.

    Fight.
    Flee.
    Flow.

    Gee, there are three.

    I take from your post that you come from an ICU background and have been in the ED for several months - hence, the 5 months to GO. You state that you enjoyed being in the ICU and now that you are in the ED - well, things are not what you expected. Now, you are nearing desperation in a quest to get back to the ICU - and it appears that you are being blocked at every turn. Hmmm.

    Not every great ICU nurse loves the ED. More often than not - it is a difficult transition. Different worlds with some shared skill sets. Maybe it is just not your thing. And that is okay. This is not a criticism - but an offer of an idea. You seem to be unhappy. I'll bet that those you work with KNOW it. You have sent out the "feelers" in an effort to get back to where you started - you have several issues with the chaos, doctors, politics and stuff. I would suggest that your BEST exit strategy is to take ownership of the "Well, it is just not for me, you guys do an awesome job, but (no harm/no foul) I think I may be better suited to the ICU" option. Yeah, I know it will be hard - but no matter how f'ed up a situation is very few folks that are mired in it want to admit that they have any role in it. Some nurses love co-dependency, thrive on it! It sounds like that ED is a bit toxic, at least toxic to you. Just admit that they are an amazing staff and you are so grateful for having had the opportunity, but it is just NOT for you! (It may be a bit of acting - but you may get your reward!)

    Now, as to small towns, limited options and facilities, travel contracts and agency work.

    I am in a small town too. Limited options. I drive 2 1/2 hours each way to work. It is worth it to me! Maybe the $$$ is the same in the end, but my happiness is pretty important. I am cautiously happy. Yep, I said it! (To be fair - I do work 24 hour shifts - so it is a twice weekly commute, not every day.)

    Happiness is important. This is a tough business, there is no good reason to be miserable - there are other options.

    Travel is a different world. Sure, there are some good places - but MOST are not paying you the premium because they just want to ramp up staffing and they are otherwise great places to work. They are using travel nurses BECAUSE they have a staffing problem. Many make your current situation look comforting! Sure, it may just be 13 weeks - but....

    Travel assignments can easily be a nightmare. Short staffing, core staff/support staff resentment (in some cases, at least a couple of these folks everywhere), impatient doctors, unrealistic administration and almost certain unsafe assignments. (Well, you are making more - so most think that you should earn IT!) And if the s%#& hits the fan - you can bet YOU will be easily sacrificed. IMHO, it may be an interim option - but, you need to be very careful. It is not really possible to know just how bad it can be - until you are there AND then it is hard to get out of! And expensive. Consider carefully.

    As to local agency. You note that you are in WVA. Well, you have the Bluefield, Charleston, Huntington, Morgantown markets. Most all are within a couple hours drive from anywhere in Almost Heaven West Virginia. If you are doing it for money - pick the most lucrative and then just go along to get along for the dollars! If you are considering "agency" instead of your staff job - move slow. Do a few test shifts AND then see if a local contract is possible, otherwise you may be looking more than working. Just be sure and remember that most of these places have staffing shortages for a REASON.

    Anyway, I do wish you the best of luck. Sometimes you just have to reframe things to get a better picture! You are not the first one to be in this situation - so have faith - IT does get BETTER.

  6. by   RN Randy
    Quote from jennifer_25_nurse
    If you want to appreciate your job more you may need to move to an area that appreciates you more and where you feel like you can't be replaced. I would consider looking for a MAGNET hospital. I understand working in a rural setting because I have done both, but a large hospital in urban area worked great for me. You may have to relocate to get something you like. Lots of places offer relocation bonuses and if it's an option for you go for it (after some deep research). I felt a great sense of team work when I worked for a facility that was going for MAGNET status. Now you must always consider that places always look great when they are trying to recruit you but keep researching and find a place that won't waste your time by networking here and local message boards. Ask questions about certain facilities on a local board to find out what the employees really think. Not just the nurses but all staff opinions count and that helps you to decide which hospitals have true team players. Hope this helps. Good luck!
    And excellent advice that is. I agree completely, but my wife may not be as eager to jump ship with me, LOL.
    It'll be a looong talk, that's for sure!
    rb
  7. by   steelcityrn
    Look for something else, you do not have to work around that.
  8. by   RN Randy
    Quote from nremt-p/rn
    i feel your pain.
    i take from your post that you come from an icu background and have been in the ed for several months - hence, the 5 months to go. you state that you enjoyed being in the icu and now that you are in the ed - well, things are not what you expected. now, you are nearing desperation in a quest to get back to the icu - and it appears that you are being blocked at every turn. hmmm.

    yup, that about sums it up.

    not every great icu nurse loves the ed.
    you seem to be unhappy.

    no question about it, i hate the situation that exists there; the er as a whole is perfectly fine. however; this multi-facility conglomerate keeps it's cardiac patients at my er, trauma at the er across town, and the kiddies at the women/children hospital. so, no matter where one works, they only get half the experience and variety. so all i see is cp, abd pain and dilaudid pain. if i go to the trauma er, then all i see is broken bones, lacs, and dilaudid pain. it is a self-destructive and "limiting" environment no matter how it is sliced. then factor in the lack of order, organization, finding a cart that's actually stocked with supplies, getting an assistant to actually hook up one of the three patients i just got slammed with, etc. then, let's all forget the patient and focus on the 'beat the clock' issues to keep the docs out of trouble. makes it a rough day.

    i'll bet that those you work with know it.

    bet ya my last paycheck they don't.....


    best exit strategy is to take ownership of the "well, it is just not for me, you guys do an awesome job, but (no harm/no foul) i think i may be better suited to the icu" option.

    yep, that is exactly what i've been saying, but when the manager is about to shut the place down due to not enough of the overstaffed perdiem people showing up for work, they really don't care about my issue, only my warm body.

    i am in a small town too. limited options. i drive 2 1/2 hours each way to work. it is worth it to me! maybe the $$$ is the same in the end, but my happiness is pretty important. i am cautiously happy. yep, i said it! (to be fair - i do work 24 hour shifts - so it is a twice weekly commute, not every day.)

    i've always said, i'd get my medic card back the day it pays me a nursing salary, lol... and i'd drive 3 hours one-way for the right bus. i'm looking into getting my cct and here we have emsa-rn cert that allows me to work as a medic, and try to get on a cct truck. i think pay is salaried, around 55k/yr, same schedule, 24on/48off.

    happiness is important. this is a tough business, there is no good reason to be miserable - there are other options.

    amen to that, bro.

    travel assignments can easily be a nightmare.

    been there/done that, got the stains on my t-shirt. used to travel a lot in respiratory. loved it back in the day but you're right, now it's probably a nightmare.

    - so have faith - it does get better.

    rest assured that i'm resting assured! i'm a mover and a shaker, and i be movin' and shakin'!

    thanks a bunch and hope to be in hog heaven soon. shouldn't be too hard, what with the nursing shortage and all... lol.
    rb

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