Smokers - page 8

Just wondering if anyone knows why so many of us nurses smoke??? Couldn't be the STRESS could it?? At all of the places I've worked, almost all the nurses smoked, including me. Seems kind of odd... Read More

  1. by   mario_ragucci
    Hey Sharann - smoking and gasoline have similiarities in this context, can't you see? Now I all ready said that I would not go into this, but since you ask what it IS, I'll tell you.

    Both cigarettes and gasoline burn.
    Both produce harmful and toxic vapors, when burnt.
    We ALL inhale the vapors, whether or not we smoke or drive.
    Both are usually consumed for the benifit of only one person.
    Both are legal and taxed consumer "goods"
    Both leave annoying and unsightly residues on things.
    Both alter peoples lifestyles and cause dependence.
    Both are usually consumed in a "still" position.

    See? Kettle can't call the pot black :-)
  2. by   BABYGIRL_RN
    I WORK IN A VERY BUSY CCU. I ONLY GO DOWN TO SMOKE WHEN THINGS ARE QUIET. NONSMOKERS HAVE THEIR FAULTS AS DO SMOKERS. PEOPLE NEED TO STOP BEING SO JUDGEMENTAL AND GET ALONG. WITH ALL THE STRESS IN NURSING, WE DON'T NEED SOMETHING THIS STUPID TO FUSS OVER. WE NEED TO RESPECT EVERYONE AS A PERSON, AND AS A NURSE. WHETHER THEY ARE SMOKERS OR NONSMOKERS. SOME OF THE BEST NURSES I HAVE WORKED WITH ARE SMOKERS. NOT ALL SMOKERS TAKE 4-5 BREAKS EVERY 12 HOUR SHIFT.
  3. by   willie2001
    Uh, Mario, who are you to tell me to stay in my place?I don't think I'm better than anybody else as you seem to imply. I have plenty of friends and co-workers, both non-smokers and smokers. We all get along. I have asked some of the smokers, why they smoke and you know what they tell me. They say they're addicted and can't quit. I do know a couple that have successfully quit. Bottom line, Smoking is an addiction; physical/ psychological, driving is not. Comparing the hazards of smoking with anything else is the defense that alot of smokers use to rationalize their habit. It doesn't wash. By the way, I'm all for letting this thread die in peace.
    Last edit by willie2001 on Feb 13, '02
  4. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by JMP
    Dear NURSE FOR KIDS.....
    When you say " who would choose to be a homosexual" do you realize how ignorant and backward and insulting that is? Something tells me you don't. And then, to compare it to smoking. Lumping a sucking a cigarette together with gays. Come on. Give your head a shake.

    I am not gay. I am a very PROUD mother of a gay son, however, and I deeply resent your comments.

    RETHINK your rational.
    Dear JMP,
    Ignorance comes in all forms, you show a wonderful example of one; speaking before thinking. I have several gay friends, and the line you quoted me on above actually came from them, not one of my originals. I don't think anyone would CHOOSE homosexuality, it's a horrid life to live--full of challenge. Although I chose to begin smoking, now it's an addiction stronger than anything I ever imagined. I see the challenge of quitting as a homosexual sees trying to live straight. Soooooooo, before you advise me, before you become defensive, think about what's being said. If you still resent my comments, then you obviously have a problem with your sons "choice".
    Nurs4kids
  5. by   sharann
    I smoked a few today and feel lousy. I really hate the habit. I like to smoke, I do (except for the horrid smell that is). It is an addiction and I am an addict. Whatever powers may be (or my own powers), help me get through this.
    p.s: I never took many breaks as a smoker, and take almost none as a non-smoker. That made me stop and think. STUPID ME. I will start taking "non-smoking" breaks. Maybe visit friends on another unit or go for fresh(for real) air...
    Later
  6. by   CATHYW
    I'll tell you all what:
    today is 6 years since I quit smoking, but reading all of your posts about it makes me jones for one in a big way!

    Please be considerate of each other-slamming someone verbally has never resulted in anything but hard feelings. You can't make someone quit smoking by using words or logical argument or information. Rarely can you "argue" someone into seeing your point of view. Some people like to smoke, no question-I am one of them. But, just like overeating, or over ANYTHING, there are dynamics at work besides the obvious.
    Sure, everyone has their own opinion about things, and sure, smoke in public places affects more people than just the smoker. However, there is a polite way to talk about things. If you are aggressive in your approach, and an already defensive smoker becomes more defensive, what do you get? An impasse!
    Ya'll be nice now, hear?
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I hope nobody has taken offense to my post as I see it may have been misinterpreted. My comment about staff shirking duties to smoke excessively was not intended to slam smokers. I dislike covering sick patients for ANY nurse who shirks his/her duties beyond their break time, whether they are smoking or not. Nurses on the phone with their boyfriends for the umpteenth time while their vents alarm away ...that's a BIG pet peeve of mine! We all should use our breaks for whatever we wish, but not abuse the privilege. Hope I didn't cause any hard feelings... luv ya'll!
  8. by   Yvonne123
    I have smoked for about ten years and I think the stress of nursing school is what keeps me smoking. When I'm at clinical and my instructor gets on my case, the only thing I can think about is that cig! Isn't that sick! Then I don't think about the fact that I'm going back and telling my patients with copd that smoking is bad. What a role model I'm turning out to be this early in my career! Anyone have any idea why it is that those who are in the healthcare field take care of so many people but cannot take care of themselves properly!
  9. by   Nurse_Bonita
    I work as a Nurse's Aide and we are allowed 2 15 minute breaks and a 30 minute non-paid lunch. I smoke and unfortunately I am having a horrible time trying to quit. we take our breaks in rotations depending on where in thre building we are. I have noticed that the ones who take breaks first usually take longer that their allowed time, leaving me with a short break because I won't be out past the permitted time. I should quit and I guess I will someday, but until then...
    ... I take the short breaks and then do everyone elses work like I always do.
  10. by   135ctv
    Smoke (as well as strong perfumes) can bother someone with allergies. When working, I try (when possible) not to get too close to a smoker. Someone who is bedridden does not have this option. I realize that many patients are smokers and many patients do not have conditions which would be bothered by the smell of smoke, but smokers (as well as those who apply liberal doses of perfume) should be aware of the effect that it can have on some people.

    I resent working with someone who rushes through their work so that they can have a smoke break. I also dislike someone who, in response to a patient's request, says "wait till I get back from my smoke break".

    However, it's not actually the smoke breaks that bother me. Some smokers do not seem to need the frequent smoke breaks that others need and they do not take their breaks at inconvenient times. Coworkers who are constantly on their cell phones or take frequent breaks to make personal calls are also inconsiderate as are those who seem to always take their breaks at inconvenient times.

    If you find a way (for ANY reason) to take more breaks than your coworkers, then you are not pulling your share of the load.

    I don't mind working with a smoker, I can put up with the smell of it on their clothes for the length of time I am working.

    Working with someone who is basically lazy does bother me. I'm sure if some of the smokers who took frequent breaks stopped smoking, they would find another reason to avoid work.
  11. by   JMP
    Nurse4Kids-

    My son does not "choose" to be gay. He was born gay. It is not a choice you make. And for you to make that statement tells me how much you do not know about the subject.

    My orignial irritation was with the notion you put forward that smoking and being homosexaul are somehow the same. " Who would choose to do either".

    It is an insult to the gay community. It shows ignorance.

    So you see the challenge of quiting smoking, like the challenge of gays "trying to live straight"? First of all, gays do not "try to live straight". Maybe in the 1950's and 60's. Not today. Not where I come from, anyways. What state do you live in?
    Second, I still resent the nasty habit of sucking on an cigarette being lumped together with your off-color view of gays. It is rank.
  12. by   mario_ragucci
    I used to think rank was an order that soldiers used, or just of people in general. Can a situation be rank? Now I learn.rank

    \Rank\, ranc strong, proud; cf. D. rank slender, Dan. rank upright, erect, Prov. G. rank slender, Icel. rakkr slender, bold. The meaning seems to have been influenced by L. rancidus, E. rancid.] 1. Luxuriant in growth; of vigorous growth; exuberant; grown to immoderate height; as, rank grass; rank weeds.

    2. Raised to a high degree; violent; extreme; gross; utter; as, rank heresy. ``Rank nonsense.'' --Hare. ``I do forgive thy rankest fault.'' --Shak.

    3. Causing vigorous growth; producing luxuriantly; very rich and fertile; as, rank land. --Mortimer.

    4. Strong-scented; rancid; musty; as, oil of a rank smell; rank-smelling rue. --Spenser.

    5. Strong to the taste. ``Divers sea fowls taste rank of the fish on which they feed.'' --Boyle.

    I appreciate the inspiration.
  13. by   JMP
    Rank is slang. Slang is not in the dictonary you are reading-typing from. The slang meaning is- distastful, smells bad, not something you want around. Get it?
    You seem young not to know this term. Perhaps it is regional.

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