Protein linked to elevated BMI in people of American Indian, Mexican ancestry

  1. University of Minnesota researchers have discovered a variant of a common blood protein, apolipoprotein C1, in people of American Indian and Mexican ancestry that is linked to elevated body mass index (BMI), obesity and Type 2 diabetes. The finding were published in the Feb. 20 online issue of the International Journal of Obesity.
    Lead investigator Gary Nelsestuen, a professor in the College of Biological Sciences' department of biochemistry, said the abnormal protein may promote metabolic efficiency and storage of body fat when food is abundant. This could have provided a survival advantage to American Indians in the past when food was scarce. The discovery can be used to identify those who are at risk for diabetes and to guide diet and lifestyle choices to prevent diabetes.
    Apolipoprotein C1 is a component of high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL). HDL cholesterol is often referred to as good cholesterol, while LDL is called bad cholesterol. The common form of C1 tends to be found in the high-density protein complexes (HDL) that ferry cholesterol to storage depots in the body and are linked to lower cardiovascular disease risk. But the variant form of C1 tends to become part of low density protein complexes (LDL), which transport cholesterol to arterial walls and are associated with higher cardiovascular disease risk. Thus, having the variant could tip the balance of cholesterol carriers and lead toward depletion of HDL-also a risk factor for heart disease. The variant differs from the normal protein by a single change in one of its 57 amino acids.


    The entire article: http://www.emaxhealth.com/39/9756.html
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  2. 1 Comments

  3. by   FireStarterRN
    I find it interesting that they refer to it as an "abnormal" protein, when in fact it's obviously a trait that had proven biologically advantageous to people throughout time. It just doesn't work well in times of continuous availability of processed foods. My point is that, our modern diets are the abnormality here, not the genetic traits of certain population groups.

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