NS IV bolus on burn patient

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    Okay, I am still pretty much a new student nurse. I don't know much about IV bolus except that it is use to administer fluid and medication at a fast rate. If there's anything else that I need to know about it please just fire away with the explanations.

    Ahhhmmm...the main reason for this post is to ask why burn patients are administered NS IV bolus STAT.

    Also, what about Saline Lock? I am not familiar with it and after reading about it I am still kinda confuse. It it just an access for IV infusion in case of emergency (to prevent poking patient all the time)? Why is it ordered on a burn patient?
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  5. 2
    Burns cause a very dangerous fluid shift from the vascular space into tissues. A person may sustain a burn that may even appear mild, yet have deadly effects on the body. The Parkland formula is the fluid resuscitation formula I was taught in nursing school. There is an enormous amount of even basic info in regard to burns- here is a great website I found that gives some basics. http://www.remm.nlm.gov/burns.htm
    ObtundedRN and flyingchange like this.
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    Use the web to find you homework on burn patient including iv fluids and blood work.
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    Saline lock is just the term for an iv that is in place, ready to be accessed for future fluid boluses or IV pushes. Anyone who has an IV, but no fluids or medications running at the moment, is considered 'saline locked'.
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    A burn causes cellular damage leading to an inflammatory response, which increases capillary permeability, which leads to a fluid shift from the intravascular space to the third spacing, which leads to a dehydration condition. Dehydration lowers BP, which decreases cardiac output, which decreases tissue perfusion throughout the body. Dehydration can be averted by initiating fluid resuscitation, which typically is done with LR, not NS, though. How much fluid is given is individually calculated. The Parland formula I was taught was 4 mL/kg multiplied by the burn surface area (BSA). I believe the most common method of calculating a BSA for an adult is the "Rule of Nines" and for children the Lund-Browder chart. Then of this amount is given within 8 hours of the injury, the next 8 hours, and the last the next 8 hours. Fluid administered after this 24 hours is less predictable.


    As missbutton stated, saline lock just means that an IV cath is in place for IV access, if or when that access is needed.
    Last edit by Sunny Lioness on Oct 31, '10
    nursingstudent_2012 likes this.
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    this website is great. Thanks so much
  10. 0
    Quote from missbutton
    Saline lock is just the term for an iv that is in place, ready to be accessed for future fluid boluses or IV pushes. Anyone who has an IV, but no fluids or medications running at the moment, is considered 'saline locked'.

    that make sense. I was knida thinking that that's what is it really for but I wasn't 100% sure. Thanks for confirming it
  11. 0
    Quote from Sunny Lioness
    A burn causes cellular damage leading to an inflammatory response, which increases capillary permeability, which leads to a fluid shift from the intravascular space to the third spacing, which leads to a dehydration condition. Dehydration lowers BP, which decreases cardiac output, which decreases tissue perfusion throughout the body. Dehydration can be averted by initiating fluid resuscitation, which typically is done with LR, not NS, though. How much fluid is given is individually calculated. The Parland formula I was taught was 4 mL/kg multiplied by the burn surface area (BSA). I believe the most common method of calculating a BSA for an adult is the "Rule of Nines" and for children the Lund-Browder chart. Then of this amount is given within 8 hours of the injury, the next 8 hours, and the last the next 8 hours. Fluid administered after this 24 hours is less predictable.


    As missbutton stated, saline lock just means that an IV cath is in place for IV access, if or when that access is needed.
    thanks. This helps a lot.


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