Job Title?? - page 2

A recent illness and death in our family is one of the reasons I have chose to go into the nursing field. I know what I *want* to do, but I'm not exactly sure what area this would fall into. ... Read More

  1. by   Gompers
    Quote from ARmickie
    However, I just want to explain something that most of you are hitting on... the telling the family everything is going to be okay. That is not at all what I'm suggesting. I'm saying that is most often a families state of mind... nobody sitting in a waiting room wants a doc to come out and say "I'm sorry.. we did all we could".. that is just not what you want to hear. I'm not saying to TELL them anything, neither good nor bad, it was simply a statement made regarding state of mind of families in the critical care arena.

    I suppose this is where I keep getting confused? What is it you think we should say in situations like that? Whether the family wants to hear it or not, we have to give them the information. What is wrong with saying that we did all we could? Or that it doesn't look good? I am very confused as to what you think we should say in that situation. We need to be honest.

    Not trying to be annoying, just trying to understand so that I can better serve my patients' families in the future.
  2. by   ARmickie
    Quote from Gompers
    I suppose this is where I keep getting confused? What is it you think we should say in situations like that? Whether the family wants to hear it or not, we have to give them the information. What is wrong with saying that we did all we could? Or that it doesn't look good? I am very confused as to what you think we should say in that situation. We need to be honest.

    Not trying to be annoying, just trying to understand so that I can better serve my patients' families in the future.
    I believe you should tell the truth about the situation. I have said over and over, I do not think anyone should just tell a family "it's going to be ok" if that isn't the truth. I'm simply stating that's what is in their minds.. that's what they want to believe more than anything else.. I'm not suggesting to lie to anyone, and I agree wholeheartedly in being honest. My whole issue here is that because a family has this type of mindset most of the time, it's hard for them to grasp the actual reality of it sometimes. Nine times out of a ten, a family is going to hold tight to anything positive the doctor has had to say and let the rest of the info fall by the wayside for a bit. I don't see anything wrong with telling a family either of those things.. the truth is the truth. I'm just saying that sometimes, as a family with a loved one in a critical situation, it's hard to wrap your mind around the total truth when it's presented to you and not all of the information you are given "sticks". I have a lot more respect for those doctors who DO shoot straight from the hip when it comes to telling things how they are. I've learned over the years, after being in the critical care waiting area more times than I care to remember, to stop a doctor in mid sentence if I have to in order to ask a question. I get all my questions asked as they come to me -- but, at the same time, I've seen many families who speak w/ a doctor and say "thank you" after the doc says his part, only to have them sit down and talk to family and when they are asked something, it's "I don't know, I meant to ask that, but...."
    Again, I'm not badmouthing doctors or nurses or anyone else. I was simply stating what I've seen happen over and over.. it's a mindset.. not a fault of the medical community at all.
    And, while I agree that the medical science is still much a gray area, I'm not going to beat a dead horse here.

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