Infusaport Question

  1. I just admitted a patient that transfered from another hospice and hasn't had his infusaport flushed in 10 weeks. Should I try to flush it or do you think its gone bad? What is the longest they can go without being flushed? I thought they were supposed to be flushed every 6 weeks? He is a terminal cancer patient, so I would like to keep his port in working condition in case he needs IV pain meds down the road. Thanks in advance.
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   alakaea
    Hi! I have no idea what you mean and in no way can I answer your question. But could you tell me what an infusaport is and why it would have to be flushed? Trying to learn as much as I can....
  4. by   meownsmile
    If it hasnt been accessed, i think i would access it and see if it flushes ok. Dont force, it should flush easily if it was loaded with heparin before it was deaccessed. Im not totally sure about any limitations on accessing without flushing but i dont know that 4 weeks is going to make a big difference if it hadnt been accessed in 6 weeks anyway. Take it easy with it and good luck.
  5. by   webblarsk
    Quote from meownsmile
    If it hasnt been accessed, i think i would access it and see if it flushes ok. Dont force, it should flush easily if it was loaded with heparin before it was deaccessed. Im not totally sure about any limitations on accessing without flushing but i dont know that 4 weeks is going to make a big difference if it hadnt been accessed in 6 weeks anyway. Take it easy with it and good luck.
    Thanks! I will give it a try!
  6. by   Katnip
    Quote from alakaea
    Hi! I have no idea what you mean and in no way can I answer your question. But could you tell me what an infusaport is and why it would have to be flushed? Trying to learn as much as I can....
    Infusaport, Mediports, etc are implanted IV access ports. They're implanted under the skin usually in the chest, sometimes the upper arm. They are put in for people who need frequent IV access and may have poor peripheral access. Cancer patients, sickle cell patients, and others who get frequent IV meds are usually candidates for getting these ports. They're accessed under sterile conditions and do need to be flushed regularly. When not in use they are hep-locked. You can draw blood from them, too.

    To the OP: I agree with the other answer. Definitely try to access it and see what happens. I've had ports that won't give a return, but flush wonderfully for giving meds.

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