ICU - Should I stay or go? - page 4

Hi all, This is my first post but I have read posts for over 2 years. I am having some issues in my new job and need your advice. I graduated in Dec 2004 and began working on a Med/Surg Trauma... Read More

  1. by   kadokin
    Quote from AlexCCRN
    Don't go quietly. Establish yourself as a critical thinking, caring, safe RN who's willing to argue their case without emotion. I mean, whenever something ridiculous presents itself and you are certain about your facts - represent yourself, demonstrate that your not a push over. Challenge their *judgements* of you. Who are they to judge your passion. Good grief. Bunch of little primadonas... and they're a dime a dozen so might as well practice the art of deflating their hilarious notions with evidenced based practice and theory in a unit you may leave cause you'll be faced with this again and again. Become your own advocate without seeming arrogant. Keep to objective non-emotional responses. Don't allow them to bait and hook you. It's all fun and games for the tenured staff. So NEVER let them see you sweat
    Good answer. Although I only know about your unit from what you described, here's my guess: The staff is resentful and jealous b/c they know you will soon be moving on to anesthesia school and they want you to know that being a critical care RN is no picnic. As for bringing up social issues in your eval, I wonder if that is even legal. Granted, you have to be able to work as a team, but isn't it more important to be able to care safely for your pts? Had a similar situation myself, although not in an ICU-CRNA situation. My sup mentioned in my 1st eval as a new nurse that I shouldn't be so "standoffish" HUH? It was the existing staff who were supposed to be precepting me that were making ME feel like an outsider. And I mean I went OUT OF MY WAY to be friendly. Granted, sometimes, I took down time to study meds, disorders, etc., but I was in no way standoffish. My first instinct was to tell you to run away as fast as you can from this toxic environment, but maybe you can learn some new skills as this poster suggested. I stuck it out and now I work w/some of these people as colleagues. I can't imagine we'll ever be close friends, though. I know how s***** they can be, and, frankly, I don't need friends like that.
  2. by   kadokin
    Quote from OahuRN
    Thank you all for your posts! I am sorry I have not replied earlier than now but my plate has been full. As for the ICU I was in - I did make the decision to leave. I will float to another unit starting this week and will also look at other ICU positions. The final straw this week was when my preceptor told me that she had deliberately set "traps" for me. In a meeting with her and my manager - my preceptor showed me a "secret" evaluation she had filled out. In it, she commented on how she had tested me on several things (one in particular- disconnecting a chest tube from suction to see if I would notice) and whether I had picked up on all of them or not. Apparently, I did miss some things - I do not know what they are as she did not comment on them. After getting over the initial shock of this - I told my preceptor and manager that I did not feel this was the right place for me and that my preceptor's actions were unprofessional, unethical, and unsafe nursing and I could not stay in such an environment. I am deeply saddened over the whole ordeal - I had never before encountered the "older nurses eating their young" syndrome commonly associated with nursing and so I was really not prepared for this. Dont misunderstand me - I take FULL RESPONSIBILITY for not noticing the disconnected CT (it was disconnected from the wall suction for 2 hours per my preceptor) but I was not prepared to be sabotaged by my preceptor. After all is said and done - this is not the place for me- and while I am a bit crushed - I will go on, find another position and chalk this up as experience. Again thank you all for your kind replies.
    Setting traps? Disconnecting chest tubes to see if you would notice? OH MY GOD These people need to leave nursing to the professionals and get a job at Disneyworld. I am sure Mickey Mouse would appreciate the way they do things. Honestly. I CAN NOT believe it. !
  3. by   bluesky
    Listen, what your ex-preceptor did was completely unsafe, unprofessional and unbecoming of a nurse. I would also pursue any type of action that would hold the irresponsible RN accountable.

    All that said, you can take home a little lesson here. Now I am just guessing here so don't flame me and please forgive me if I am wrong... but your husband often refers to your future plans to go to CRNA with such ambition and confidence that such behavior has the potential to offend seasoned nurses if you step up to them with the same attitude, especially as a new nurse in the ICU. Now, mind you, I am in no way justifying what your preceptor did. Keep that in mind. However I'd like to suggest that your ICU experience is a valuable one in which you will meet many clinical champions who will help you on your way to being a great CRNA. Boasting about your grades or your future plans is not going to help you in that environment until you prove that you are a strong nurse, period.
  4. by   OahuRN
    Again, thank you all for your kind replies. I also wanted to note that I never told any of my co-workers about my plans to attend CRNA school or talked about my grades to anyone. I learned through this board that many people have had issues when they told others of their plans and so I kept this information to myself. So I don't think my future plans or current schooling had anything to do with the treatment I recieved. Also just a note- our facility only required checking and documenting the CT status every 4 hours. I know some of you will cringe or not believe this - but I keep a blank set of docs at home (we just got new forms in Nov and I wanted to study them). Not that I should have not been checking but documenting is only every 4 hours.
  5. by   bluesky
    Quote from OahuRN
    Again, thank you all for your kind replies. I also wanted to note that I never told any of my co-workers about my plans to attend CRNA school or talked about my grades to anyone. I learned through this board that many people have had issues when they told others of their plans and so I kept this information to myself. So I don't think my future plans or current schooling had anything to do with the treatment I recieved. Also just a note- our facility only required checking and documenting the CT status every 4 hours. I know some of you will cringe or not believe this - but I keep a blank set of docs at home (we just got new forms in Nov and I wanted to study them). Not that I should have not been checking but documenting is only every 4 hours.
    OK. Well then the unit you were on was a towering inferno of incompetence that will unfortunately be supremely difficult and time consuming to battle. Furthermore, it won't get you any closer to your long term goal of CRNA or bust. As a past union shop steward, I would have encouraged you to fight these lunatics to the end however knowing that bedside nursing is not your final goal, I would suggest putting all your energy into becoming the bestest CRNA ever so that you will be able to return a few years later and really give it to them. I don't know if this helps but not all CRNA schools require extensive SICU experience. One representative at Georgetown, for example, told me that there were a couple of people in her program who were in the ICU for less than a year.

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