How to get to work in a snowstorm? - page 9

Hi. I was wondering what your hospitals policy is on snowdays? Ours doesn't have one and I live 1 1/2 hours from work. The highway was actually closed and I was still expected to come in?... Read More

  1. by   GardenDove
    Quote from AfloydRN
    Thank for being one of the reasonable people.

    Say, how come you work so far from your home?
  2. by   AfloydRN
    The one question I didn't answer. I worked for our local hospital for 11 years and finally got tired of being treated like crap. I don't want to work for them anymore. The problem is ... they own everything, local clinics, specialty clinics, nursing homes etc. You pretty much have to drive the distance to be treated well. They know it too. Most people just stay and suck it up. That got old. I guess 11 years was my max.
  3. by   lorster
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]it never ceases to amaze me how many of those people who think it's too dangerous (and not worth their life) to drive to work in the snow don't seem to have these hesitations about driving home!
    well ruby vee. i work 140 miles from home. i take the greyhound. it happens to work for me. and no, i would not drive home in a blizzard. i will get a hotel room and take the next bus home. not all nurses have this option but it is one worth considering if a storm were to come. i am working in the morning. i have a bus ticket bought for 0345 which is when it leaves. it will arrive at my destination one hour before my shift begins. this is an option for nurses who have access to the transit.
  4. by   lorster
    Quote from mercyteapot
    Whoever made the remark about the snowmobile, the funny thing is that there were people who brought their's into work once or twice during really bad storms. Shoot, why not??? It isn't like they had to worry about the traffic. When I was growing up, the minister of our church lived about 5 miles away and he used to drive his snowmobile on bad Sundays. Lots of church members lived within walking distance and made the trek, so the effort was worth it.
    snow mobiles are illegal on many roads and highways as they tear up the road. This is not always an option.
  5. by   all4schwa
    The bottom line is-- WHO is going to care for the patients. I'm not talking about being a martyr. Some of those patients will literally die if there is nobody there to take care of them. If everyone there started work at the same time, eventually they are all going to drop!
  6. by   barbyann
    The CEO would have to pass my house on his way into the hospital. How about he offers to give me a ride in?

    It would never happen cause evidently he doesn't own snow boots.

    Who could possibly be more essential in the chaos created during a winter weather related staffing crisis?

    Practice what you preach! Your staff learns from your example. If the staff sees administration making concerted efforts during snow storms (yes, even if they happen on nights and weekends) they will surely make more of an effort to get to work.
  7. by   Mulan
    Quote from all4schwa
    The bottom line is-- WHO is going to care for the patients. I'm not talking about being a martyr. Some of those patients will literally die if there is nobody there to take care of them. If everyone there started work at the same time, eventually they are all going to drop!

    Then the nurses who work in administration can care for them. Oh wait, they are all at home, cause they didn't go in early or drive in during the blizzard.
  8. by   jannrn
    A few years ago when Portland, OR had a deep freeze and black ice over several inches of snow, some nurses got stuck at work, unable to get home, so they slept at the hosp and got up and went back to work the next day. some of us were able to get to work with 4 wheel drives and husbands at the wheel, I think that others offered to pick up those who couldn't drive or didn't have a 4-wheel. it was also very quiet on the maternity ward with no visitors (peace for the new families!) and no scheduled inductions, etc. all elective stuff cancelled! I kind of enjoyed the quiet!
  9. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from lorster
    snow mobiles are illegal on many roads and highways as they tear up the road. This is not always an option.
    As I specifically stated, I wasn't suggesting anyone ride a snowmobile into work. I was just relating a story. And the minister of that church died last year, so for those inclined to call the cops, you missed your chance.
  10. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from mercyteapot
    As I specifically stated, I wasn't suggesting anyone ride a snowmobile into work. I was just relating a story. And the minister of that church died last year, so for those inclined to call the cops, you missed your chance.
    My next-door neighbor when I was a kid was a nurse, and I recall several times that guys on snowmobiles would come and get her to take her to work. At the time, I thought it was pretty cool.
  11. by   Beech1184
    I think you made the right decision in your situation. You must be pretty dedicated to commute 3 hrs per day on a regular basis.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from AfloydRN
    Thank for being one of the reasonable people.

    reasonable = sees-it-my-way


    Thing of it is, though, no job may be worth someone's life, and i'm not talking about martyrism here, but, for me, the fact that i live 30 miles away from my job, it's not the hospital's problem. It is my responsibility to get myself to work. I agree with traumaRus who spoke about planning. If you hear a bad weather report, leave before the storm hits etc.

    I chose to work at a hospital, i chose to live 30 miles away. It's my responsibility to get to work.
  13. by   PANurseRN1
    And if you have kids, it's your responsibility to make sure you have contingency plans. I'm a bit tired of the old "but I have kids" card being played in these situations. (And holidays, and off shifts, and weekends...)

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