How do you incorporate faith into your daily nursing tasks? - page 10

The question is pretty much self-explanatory. I'm getting my BSN in a faith-based, private university with their own hospital. I've observed that there's such a huge difference between nurses who incorporate their faith into... Read More

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    Just today, my facility, had a voluntary candle-lighting and "blessing of the hands that provide care for our patients" ceremony. Very quick and great way to build morale for our employees.
    kakamegamama likes this.

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    "Whatever you do unto the least of men, you do unto me"~Jesus

    Its all about keeping patience, trying to stay calm with difficult situations or people, and doing the best job that you possibly can. I don't preach to my patience but I do encourage them to use respect. I pray prior to work, and sometimes during work on stressful days. Its a matter of perspective and how you individually feel, and treat people. I know co-workers who are religious and those who are not. As long as we work together to care for our patience and do our workload, thats all that matters.
    eagle78, ZippyGBR, kakamegamama, and 1 other like this.
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    I found it very interesting that the responses were so offended by the question and how they took it. If someone has no "faith" it does not make them a lesser person or inferior nurse at all. In fact in my school, we were encouraged to explore our beliefs and to get comfortable with the topics of prayer, other religions other than our own and death. How one lives their faith largely depends on what their faith is IN, or maybe WHO it is in. When you are a believer in Jesus Christ, it is not a religion, it is a relationship and is part of your every day walk in all things. No, it does not make anyone "better than" anyone else, but it definitely affects the way you go about your life and includes your work as well. Especially a career that touches people when they are hurting. What comforts each of us is how we reach out, or not. When you are strong in what you know to be true of GOD, it affects your view of life, death, pain, work ethic etc.
    Personally, I have always prayed on the way to work about being aware of the needs and not to miss important things or overlook anything and for patients and fellow workers. Have seen some really great answers to prayer also!
    eagle78, kakamegamama, martinalpn, and 1 other like this.
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    I'm just wondering...for all of you who are loathe to bring up religion/religious practices with patients.....how do you properly conduct a cultural assessment? Many health practices around the world have their basis in religion.
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    I think there is no reason to incorporate YOUR faith into your job as a nurse. What matters is the patient's faith and beliefs and respecting them.

    I am an atheist. I have respect for everyone's beliefs. If a patient wants me to pray with them, I will gladly hold their hand while they pray. I am here to do whatever I can to help the patient's WHOLE health, including spiritual health. I feel no need to push my "faith" or lack of onto anyone.

    I work with a nurse who pushes her faith on everyone. She once told a patient who is a Jehovah's Witness, "God bless you." Now, from what I know of this religion, their god is Jehovah, not "God". I had one JW patient who was adamant about "it's not God, it's Jehovah!" So, whether this particular patient was offended, I can't say. But it is not that nurse's place to say that to the patient anyhow.

    If your faith helps you to be caring and kind, awesome. For me, I treat everyone with respect and a non-judgmental attitude. I don't need any kind of faith to help me do that.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
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    i carry my faith with me at all times.
    it's really very easy to incorporate my faith into my nursing, into my parenting, into my relationships...everywhere.
    because it is a (large) part of who i am.

    leslie
    martinalpn, FranEMTnurse, and shellyjel like this.
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    YOU DON'T! introduce topics of religion or politics with your patients. It's never appropriate to enter an agenda in conversation, that is intrusive and inappropriate. I was taught that in "Professional Adjustments", in Nursing School over 52 years ago.

    The saying to which I like to refer is, "When the student is ready, the teacher appears". We don't know what state of readiness for religion our patients have, and if they indicate to you that they want to have religion entered into their care plan (or words to that effect), offer them a chaplain or clergy of their choice.

    Administrators get many complaints from patients, and I've never heard or read that a patient complained that they would have appreciated having more religion (or political opinion) incorporated into their care. Patients' weakened physical and mental states make them prime targets for predators of any product, way of thinking, etc. It is unethical for a nurse to take advantage of that to enter his/her own beliefs, unless asked. If asked, be brief and always preface comments with "there is no right or wrong way to be religious". You can't make problems by saying that.

    My own mother was approached by a Christian Scientist practitioner while spending six months in a hospital in 1941, recovering from her mastectomy (no effective antibiotics existed then) and fearing for her life. Her conversion to that faith caused havoc in our family, confusion for me (I was a toddler), and lack of education for me, in my own religion (Jewish). When a playmate later called me a "dirty Jew", I had no idea what that was - but I didn't like being called "dirty", at 8 years of age.

    My father, not overtly observant, said "That's enough, Clara!" to my mother when I ran home crying and they realized what had happened. Then my Jewish religious education began, and I knew and still know who I am. I can still belt out a Christian hymn and the Lord's Prayer with Christians, which surprises some.When approached by proselytizers, I am secure in my faith and say that I prefer it. Our patients want to please us, usually and don't feel strong enough sometimes, to disagree.

    Please keep your religious beliefs to yourselves! Practice what you believe for yourselves, unobtrusively. I was appalled in 1970, when some nurses refused to give nursing care to young women who had to have abortions at a hospital then. My position as Inservice Director then, allowed me to create a group for those patients, for them to voice how they were feeling. I didn't say anything to them about my own private thoughts, and believe that care can be given anyone, that way. If we have a patient with HIV or those who abuse drugs, even though we oppose their lifestyles, do we pick and choose those with whom we will work? We wouldn't work long in these times, if we did that! Incidently, I had a panel for nurses with experts on psychological and physiological aspects of abortion for mothers and neonates. It was sparsely attended, although the nurses could go on hospital time, being paid and close to their worksite.

    When I was the Director of Nursing at a Maternity "Home" in the '60s, the nurses' association asked me to give a speech about "the Unwed Mother". Hundreds of nurses turned out after hours and came far distances for that. I didn't get any judgmental questions at Q&A time, about their ethics, even though 80% relinquished their babies and "sterilization" of post partum mothers (mostly Hispanic) without their knowledge took place at that time. Go figure!

    Nurses need to respect their patients' own state of being, and encourage their own strengths, not implant other ways of thinking. Psychotherapy involves "identification process", while physical care performance does not.
    Accept your patients unconditionally, as they are, no matter how derranged they seem. That's the way to love and care for others, that works!
    Last edit by lamazeteacher on May 11, '11 : Reason: additional information shared
    ZippyGBR, cogath, casi, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from iteachob
    I'm just wondering...for all of you who are loathe to bring up religion/religious practices with patients.....how do you properly conduct a cultural assessment? Many health practices around the world have their basis in religion.
    Wow. What a condescending attitude to have. Just because a nurse does not practice an organized religion does it mean he/she is not educated in cultures/religions. A nurse does not have to be religious to support their pts in their religious preference and beliefs. You don't have to pray with a pt to properly conduct a cultural assessment and I don't recall ever reading any post saying they won't support their pts beliefs. Nice attempt.

    That is what really gets me sometimes. When a person proclaims faith in a religion but treats another human being so...
    ZippyGBR and hiddencatRN like this.
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    Quote from iteachob
    I'm just wondering...for all of you who are loathe to bring up religion/religious practices with patients.....how do you properly conduct a cultural assessment? Many health practices around the world have their basis in religion.
    A cultural assessment is about the patient. I also ask my patients a lot of questions about their health history and how they've been feeling without sharing my PMH with them.
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    Quote from up2nogood rn
    wow. what a condescending attitude to have. just because a nurse does not practice an organized religion does it mean he/she is not educated in cultures/religions. a nurse does not have to be religious to support their pts in their religious preference and beliefs. you don't have to pray with a pt to properly conduct a cultural assessment and i don't recall ever reading any post saying they won't support their pts beliefs. nice attempt.

    that is what really gets me sometimes. when a person proclaims faith in a religion but treats another human being so...
    well. where do i say you have to pray with them? furthermore, where do i say that someone who doesn't practice a religion is not educated in it?

    it really gets me sometimes....when people attribute things to me that i never said. nice attempt, though.

    please, have a look at post # 49 for some real condescending attitude and #81 (if the chaplain can't ask.....i'm guessing nurses can't either?)


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