Failed NCLEX multiple times - page 3

A question to all of the experienced nurses out there. I have seen multiple threads on this forum started by people who have taken the NCLEX multiple times and still can't pass. These threads are... Read More

  1. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from CNM2B
    No I haven't gotten to that point, but I am also not about to judge other's when I have no idea what I am getting myself into.
    To each his own. But, when u take the HESI and see and feel what I am talking about...then you will understand
  2. by   Energizer Bunny
    I don't think we are on the same page with what we are discussing...let me see if I can figure out how to word it so maybe we both get what I mean...

    I am saying that those that haven't even taken the test yet shouldn't really be judging whether or not others could be good nurses if they fail a bunch of times. You said it yourself that there is a chance you could fail...suppose you do, a couple of times. Then, would you feel that there should be a limit on how many times you can take the test? Do you think that failing a few times would necessarily make you a bad nurse?

    I'm just wondering these things...as I've said. I have NO experience in the matter and wouldn't even pretend to judge others before I do have some, even the HESI that you are talking about.
  3. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from JacelRN
    Hi all,

    I can understand your points about nurses and anxiety...if they have anxiety on a test how can they handle pressure and anxiety in real life?

    Have you known any new grad or nurse who could walk into his/her first code and know immediately what to do/what not to do?

    I know I don't. I am a new RN but that dosen't make my test-taking anxiety cross over into my clinical experience. I am prudent, rule-oriented, and asking questions to all my colleagues. The majority of new nurses for their first year begin this way. And I am on my toes in every situation from someone choking to a patient with cold and clamy skin.

    I was a bit offended that you would think that the anxiety is comparable. I was compelled to respond that we all learn how best to handle emergency situations with great mentoring from those of you who have experienced it and time spent on the job learning it. Please don't be so quick to judge those who had difficulty with Test-anxiety, not Life-anxiety.

    JacelRN
    Sorry you were offended. I am not here to be politically correct. You are entitled to your own opinion as we all are. I still think the anxiety is comparable. I am a calm person and can act and stay calm in emergencies in order to keep my head clear. If I get anxiety...I am a big mess and couldn't make a decision to save my life!
  4. by   JacelRN
    Tweetiepie,

    I hear you response but did you hear mine?

    Furthermore, anxiety can be a good thing if used correctly. Does my heart race, my palms sweat, my mouth get dry when I am faced with emergencies at work. No. In real life issues I control my anxiety as I have always done.

    However, panic attacks are serious if they happen frequently and I understand that some people trying to become nurses with these issues may not be best suited to deal with emergent situations in the workplace. I am simply stating that many graduates deal with the anxiety of TEST-TAKING and need to learn how to deal with it.

    I am one of those who LEARNED to curb my anxiety as you easily do. I am thankful you didn't have to go through it like I did, but please be a bit more compassionate about those who do not get things right away. We are all a work in progress and not perfect.

    Just wanted to defend those great nurses and future nurses who suffer from what many do, but don't talk about.

    JacelRN
  5. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from JacelRN
    Tweetiepie,
    I am thankful you didn't have to go through it like I did, but please be a bit more compassionate about those who do not get things right away. We are all a work in progress and not perfect.

    Just wanted to defend those great nurses and future nurses who suffer from what many do, but don't talk about.

    JacelRN
    I am a very compassionate person. I work with dying people! Because these are just words on a screen, you have no idea what my tone of voice is behind them. I am a very calm, considerate person. I am the one who sets up study groups to help other students out with their test anxiety by putting info in our brains!!

    It's not that I am not compassionate about those who do not get things right away..where did that come from? I am EXTREMELY patient. I explain things over and over and over with not so much as a change in my attitude. I am not perfect either...did i ever say I was?
  6. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from CNM2B
    I don't think we are on the same page with what we are discussing...let me see if I can figure out how to word it so maybe we both get what I mean...

    I am saying that those that haven't even taken the test yet shouldn't really be judging whether or not others could be good nurses if they fail a bunch of times. You said it yourself that there is a chance you could fail...suppose you do, a couple of times. Then, would you feel that there should be a limit on how many times you can take the test? Do you think that failing a few times would necessarily make you a bad nurse?

    I'm just wondering these things...as I've said. I have NO experience in the matter and wouldn't even pretend to judge others before I do have some, even the HESI that you are talking about.
    I made a response to this..but for some wierd reason it didnt show up.

    In a nutshell: I never said that failing NCLEX = a bad nurse nor do I even believe that. Yes, I would be devastated if I failed NCLEX, but i understand that there are standards that have to be met in most things in life. The BON is mostly concerned about patient safety and not really concerned about giving me endless chances.

    It is pretty much the same with a driver's license..you get a few tries and if you do not pass, you have to take the learning program over and then attempt to test some more.

    Again, I do not think that failing the NCLEX means one will be a bad nurse at all.
  7. by   dansamy
    It is pretty much the same with a driver's license..you get a few tries and if you do not pass, you have to take the learning program over and then attempt to test some more.
    I think this is a suitable idea. If you fail NCLEX x number of times, then you should be required to take a "remedial" semester before being allowed to try again. This may seem harsh but if a student has attempted 4, 5, or 6 times, I would start wondering how they actually passed their classes to begin with. I understand test anxiety. I'm not even in my nursing semesters yet, and I'm already preparing for NCLEX. I figure preparation is the best guard against anxiety. Please don't think I'm judgmental of those of you who've attempted multiple times. I'm not. I just do not feel the NCLEX should allow unlimited attempts. I also think you should be required to attempt NCLEX with x days/weeks after your course completion. If you don't attempt the test until 10 months after school, how on earth do you expect to pass? I think it should be treated more like an "exit exam" that you are required to pass before receiving your diploma/ADN/BSN.
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from CNM2B
    What gets me is people that haven't even taken the NCLEX yet judging other's when they have no idea if they will even pass.
    Guilty as charged. However, I also occasionally help out the school administrator in charge of NCLEX prep. She complains about students who failed who didn't take advantage of various prep materials, tutors, Kaplan etc. that were made available. The same slackers everybody has run into at one time or another in nursing school. So, yeah, call me crazy, but I still wouldn't want these people as my nurse. If that somehow renders my opinion invalid, so be it.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Apr 25, '04
  9. by   BabyRN2Be
    I've said it before in the graduate nurse forum and I'll say it here. I really don't like the CAT system of testing. Some people are intimidated by a computer. It's not a familiar way to take a test. Most of us take our tests in school using pencil and paper format. I know that there are advantages to using the CAT system like getting test results sooner, but I think there should be a choice.

    My opinion? Bring back the #2 pencils and paper format. Or at least give us a choice.

    A lot of people leave the testing center feeling like they have failed because the questions get progressively harder. Psychologically, this is not good for the test taker, especially one who has testing anxiety.
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    I've said it before in the graduate nurse forum and I'll say it here. I really don't like the CAT system of testing. Some people are intimidated by a computer. It's not a familiar way to take a test. Most of us take our tests in school using pencil and paper format. I know that there are advantages to using the CAT system like getting test results sooner, but I think there should be a choice.

    My opinion? Bring back the #2 pencils and paper format. Or at least give us a choice.
    I don't know what it's like at other nursing schools, but all of the nursing tests at my school are administered on computer. Just FYI.

    :spin:
  11. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    My opinion? Bring back the #2 pencils and paper format. Or at least give us a choice.
    I have taken both the paper and pencil (LPN) and computerized NCLEX (RN). The paper format was much, much, much harder!

    500 grads all together in the same room, from all over the state- most having driven to the capitol from out of town and having to stay in a motel. There were 400 questions, and you had to answer them all. Some test-takers were so overcome w/ anxiety, that they cried uncontrolably(sp) while testing and had to be escorted out. They could not complete the exam. Everyone there was practically peeing their pants.
    If you had to go to the bathroom during the 6 hr ordeal, you had to be escorted by a test preceptor who stood right outside your stall and listened.

    We got an hour break for lunch, during which many people cried, and had major anxiety attacks.
    In those days, the NCLEX-RN was given over a two day period. Imagine the stress for those grads- having to pay for out of town travel, accomidations, child care, and meals for two days, being a broke new grad!

    It took FOUR MONTHS to find out if you passed or not.
    If you wanted to work as a nurse during that four months, you had to pay $100. extra for a temporary permit to work prior to licensure.

    No, I don't think anyone who knew what it was like would want the paper and pencil test back.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Apr 25, '04
  12. by   LADYFLOWER
    Interesting thread. I'm scared of the NCLEX test and it will be at least 3 years before I take it!
  13. by   twinmommy+2
    Failing that test or passing it is no predictor of how good a nurse will be after a year or so in the field. It only tests what book material they learned in school and how they can twist it around to meet critical thinking skills.

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