devices for home self-testing PT or INR - page 2

I don't recall seeing any self-testing devices for PT or INR in client homes, but I read about them - such as Coaguchek, ProTime, Avocet many people have their own devices for checking blood... Read More

  1. by   dria
    My father has his own machine-checks his PT/INR and calls it in to the doc. Insurance picked up the tab for the machine itself, but we are currently having trouble getting them to cough up the $$$ for the lancet/test strip. They are surprisingly expensive...much more so than the glucometer strips.
  2. by   dria
    One more thing...as far as pricing or obtaining the item, we did not find any DME supplier that carried the it and ended up having to order directly from the manufacturer. The company was fantastic...a rep contacted the doctor's office to discuss the accuracy of home monitoring (and convinced him to write the order) and sent a rep way out where he lives (just east of where Jesus left his sandals) to instruct him on how to use the machine.
  3. by   gauge14iv
    yeah the stips are about 250.00 for 48 strips for the coaguchek! But then it takes almost a year to use them all.

    Also worth noting is that a machine the manufacturer sells to a docs office is different than a home use machine - that machine would have a CLIA waiver, the home use machine would not.
  4. by   GingerSue
    thanks for this information

    At what INR level should the warfarin be held -- I see above that 4.7 was indicated, but I know that in a particular case - it is held because it was 3.7
    (my textbook says that normal INR is between 2 to 3)

    That's interesting about FDA approval for the strips - what was wrong with them that they were recalled?
  5. by   kimmie518
    I can understand it's use if a patient can't make it into a laboratory, but anyone else using the machine is useless, and frankly, just lazy.

    Once your therapeutic dose has been established, you don't need to adjust your dose so frequently.



    GingerSue- Each hospital should have it's own policy pertaining to anticoag. holding. For classroom purposes, I would say anything about a 3 you would hold (if your coursework says 2-3 is normal).
  6. by   PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    Prothrombin time (PT) Normal:
    10-13 seconds
    International normalized ratio (INR):
    1.0-1.4
  7. by   GingerSue
    Quote from PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    Prothrombin time (PT) Normal:
    10–13 seconds
    International normalized ratio (INR):
    1.0–1.4

    okay - this pharmacology book says that INR is based on prothrombin time

    a normal baseline or control PT is approximately 12 sec;
    a therapeutic value (PT) is approximately 1.5 times the control (18 seconds)

    and therapeutic INR values are 2.0 to 3.0 in most conditions
  8. by   PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    :roll :roll Never question the lab.......JK
  9. by   kimmie518
    Quote from PHLEBOTOMIST_TO_RN
    Prothrombin time (PT) Normal:
    10-13 seconds
    International normalized ratio (INR):
    1.0-1.4
    No, INR is 2-3.

    An INR of 1.0-1.4 doesn't make any sense for a patient on anticoags. Since an INR is a ratio, you cant have a ratio of 1.0- that says a person on anticoags, has the same bleeding time compared to a "healthy" person, which is not the intended effect.

    1.0-1.4 makes more sense for a healthy patient.


    Where is your source from?
  10. by   gauge14iv
    Quote from xkimmie518x
    I can understand it's use if a patient can't make it into a laboratory, but anyone else using the machine is useless, and frankly, just lazy.

    Once your therapeutic dose has been established, you don't need to adjust your dose so frequently.
    In a ideal world - perhaps.

    However - all kinds of things can affect the effectiveness of coumadin - diet, illness, other medications - you name it.

    It also depends on what you are trying to achieve.

    Frankly it isn't lazy - would YOU as a 30 year old person with a fulltime job and 3 kids, who is on coumadin for a DVT/clotting disorder want to have to make a trip to a lab once a week that takes you an hour and costs you 3 bucks for parking everytime? I'd say that would get old pretty fast and lazy would have nothing to do with it! And even though this patient is stable for say 3 weeks - would you want to let someone on >10mgs of coumadin go a month or two without monitoring? I'm thinking not. Give her the monitor!
  11. by   gauge14iv
    1.0 to 1.4 is NORMAL INR for most people. It is not a therapeutic INR for people on anti-coagulants.
  12. by   kimmie518
    I wrote something but nevermind.
    Last edit by kimmie518 on Feb 16, '07 : Reason: My boyfriend lied to me.
  13. by   gauge14iv
    Because it doesnt STAY therapeutic!

    Some people are lucky enough to not have to worry - like your boyfriend - but I will tell you he is very much the exception, not the norm.

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