death - page 5

I AM A NEW NURSING GRADUATE AND I RECENTLY CAME UPON MY FIRST DEATH OF ONE OF MY PATIENTS. I FELT HORRIBLE EVEN THOUGH IT WASN'T PREVENTABLE AND THERE WAS NOTHING ANYONE COULD HAVE DONE. DO NURSES... Read More

  1. by   betts
    Life is no brief candle to me. It is sort of a splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment,and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.
    George Bernard Shaw

    I've been in nursing a long-time and have used many 'tools' in the healing process and morale. I was always told that if I kept my Heart and Head going in the right direction that I'd never have too worry about my feet.
  2. by   KIWIRN
    Your stories are beautiful and all of them sad. I have found that patients in my care dying is never easy, I always feel privileged, to share the death of a loved one and proud that I am there to give them the dignity they deserve.
    I laugh with my patients and families when they are happy and i cannot help crying when sad stuff is happening,we are such a huge part of a person's life at times often nursing the same patient more than once.
    We get to know our patients so intimately that I for one often cry but I no longer feel guilty about it, dying is a part of life to often ignored. Often a pt dying reminds me of lost friends and family and that is enough to set me off.
    The one thing I can't abide is having a patient die alone, If I can I like to be there to hold their hand while they slip away, some times family don't make it in time and they like to know how, when and if they went peacefully. Staying with the patient gives you the chance to answer some of these questions when they are asked, I have several times stayed on past my shift in order to see the family and let them know I care and grieve with them.
    My heart goes out to all of you who have lost loved ones, it IS hard to say goodbye. but they always live on in your memory (patients too).

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