Could have Lopressor contributed to death? - page 2

I need your opinions, guys, because It is eating me up. Basically, I am not even 2 years into nursing on a very busy med-surg floor and I had my first sudden death this week. I'm trying to cope with... Read More

  1. by   interleukin
    Nate,

    Yes bblockers can cause spasm...but it is not common, especially if one does not have a hx of, say, asthma. As long as her bp was ok when you gave the drug there was nothing for you to worry about, at that time, regarding that specific order.

    You can always reaffirm an order with the doc...that's what they're there for, unless it's an emergency situation, at which time there should be someone present of higher ordering authority or clinical ability.

    Anyway, she also could have had a PE which could have caused her symtoms, especially if they came on suddenly. But making dxs without all details and without being is not a good idea.

    Remember, Nate--unless you do something egregiously wrong, with intent, or the orders are really wacked out and you don't question them and then carry them out, or you ignore institution policy--it is the doc who carries the final burden. Easy to say, but legally valid(not to say you wouldn't experience some psychological hell)

    This situation, with any number of variations, will arise again and again in your practice, Nate.

    Memorize standard emergency algorithms and the probable etiologies.
    You will then grow more and more confident that what you do, when you do it, will be based on the best clinical practices guidelines available to anyone, anywhere.
  2. by   Anagray
    Thank you so much for your replies and kind words. I probably have some psychological baggage from my childhood in relation to death, so this is probably the reason why it bothers me so much. But, I think I wouldn't have it any other way.

    Love, Nat
  3. by   subee
    Quote from Anagray
    Thank you so much for your replies and kind words. I probably have some psychological baggage from my childhood in relation to death, so this is probably the reason why it bothers me so much. But, I think I wouldn't have it any other way.

    Love, Nat
    The whole country has a problem with death. Putting a fragile 82 year old women post head-injury in an ICU is a perfect example of an innocent patient being a cog in the medical-industrial complex. She was lucky enough to have a family willing to participate in a peaceful death and she was lucky enough to have you, who wished a good death for her. It was 1975 - mine was a Filipino sailor who spoke no English. I was pretty raw but knew that he was having a serious, acute problem. He was coded within a short time and died. Can't remember his name, but remember he was in bed A in room 205 with three other patients. Wish we had Allnurses back then so that we could get through the trauma more easily (it is better when you discover that your first patient death is the one of the bittersweet realities of working with sick people and that almost EVERYONE has to give themselves permission to grieve that loss of youthful immortality).

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