Comparing the Output of Nurses with Estimated Demand

  1. 0
    The article below was from 2009, but it's worth the read.

    Comparing the Output of Nurses with Estimated Demand

    Minnesota Public Radio-run blog on the state’s economy. Paul Tosto, the article’s author, posed a very pertinent question, not just for Minnesota but for every other state too: What’s the right number of nurses?
    At the current rate, the market is producing more nursing grads than the system needs. [Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system] data show “the total supply of new nurse graduates at the professional-level (RN) from both public and private institutions has increased over the past nine years. In 2008 it reached 2,800.”
    The state Department of Employment and Economic Development estimates about 2,340 openings for registered nurses each year between 2006 -2016.
    Another group, Economic Modeling Specialists Inc., projects a need for about 2,577 nurses a year through 2019, according to MnSCU.
    Between the two estimates, Minnesota schools are producing 9 to 19 percent more nurses than the state’s projected to need.

    article: http://www.economicmodeling.com/2010...imated-demand/
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  4. 3 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Where I live, the local community college, which has ADN, radiology tech, dental hygienist, phlebotomy tech, medical assistant, and health care aide programs, has a "health care partnership" with local health care businesses. The list of health care businesses includes all the major health care employers. I see a very steady supply of new employees.
  6. 0
    Quote from Susie2310
    Where I live, the local community college, which has ADN, radiology tech, dental hygienist, phlebotomy tech, medical assistant, and health care aide programs, has a "health care partnership" with local health care businesses. The list of health care businesses includes all the major health care employers. I see a very steady supply of new employees.

    Read the different areas in the table. This is across the board and not about outliers.
  7. 0
    I wasn't suggesting my area is an outlier - sorry I was unclear. In my first post I was referring to the very abundant supply of new health care employees, including nurses, in my area, facilitated locally by the community college/local health care business partnership. As far as I am aware there is an oversupply of nurses in my state, and in my area, and that is what I personally observe and is reflected in the table in the article. Yes, the article does make the case for a general overproduction of nurses across virtually all states.


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