Canadian vs. US clinical experience

  1. As a almost new grad- applying for postions in the US and Canada- my feeling is that we ( in a diploma program in Ontario) get far more clinical hours that our US counterparts.
    For example- in first year we have 330 hours- in second year- 500 hours and in third year- 875 hours. The last part of our third year- is called pregrad. This is a time when we work full time with another RN and have no class time.
    As a new grad (almost) I feel fortunate to have such experience behind me.
    I wonder how this time stacks up to the US experience?
    Another thing I would like to mention is that here, students in the BScN programs get very little clincal experience...which leaves some of them wondering how they will manage an area when they have no actual experience in that area.
    I would appreciate hearing from others about this issue.
    By the way.....the type of experience I am graduating with seems to make me a very marketable new grad.

    JMP
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    If there is one thing I have learned from reading posts it's that generalities are not good. Some programs in the States have more clinical hours than others and the BSN program at the uni I attended had more clinical than the diploma option. Just food for thought...
  4. by   snappy
    hi Sartaria
    i also live in canada and have been employed in detroit for 8 yrs, I am currently going to eastern michigan to finish my bsn, I think it is a good idea to do bsn program because of the potetial for rapid growthn nursing if you have a bsn degree, i did do 3 yr program which i am not sorry for but if i could change it now i would have done bsn.
    Originally posted by Sataria:


    I live in Ontario Canada too. I haven't started my nursing education, but after reading this board for a few days, I must say I am getting very nervous and may not even pursue a nursing career. Why? Because I wanted to take the three year diploma program offered at the community college, but I was too late registering for the September 2001 intake, which is the last intake for diploma nursing in Ontario.

    So, instead I will be waiting until 2002 to take the BScN offered at the university. I could probably get in to the BScN this year, but I can't afford it yet. After reading this board and hearing how unqualified BScN's are, I wonder if it is even worth pusuing. Why, if BScN's are less prepared, would they set the standard at a minimum requirement for BScN's for all nurses registering after Dec. 31 2004?

    This standard was determined with input from nurses already in the field. Yet, I keep hearing on this board big arguments for and against minimum standards, and infighting about who is more qualified, has more clinical experience etc..

    I currently work as a bartender, and I thought there was alot of cattieness amongst women in this job, but we get along great compared to what I have witnessed on the board.

    Don't get me wrong, I have enjoyed reading this board and there is alot of great advice, and for the most part an understanding atmosphere, but I am really second guessing whether I want to go into this setting. I am NOT second guessing about wanting to be a nurse, and caring for people, just everything else that goes with it.

    I don't want to spend four years of my life, not to mention the Ca$h ,getting my BScN only to go into what I know I would love to do and have everyonr think I am some snot because I had to go to university through no choice of my own.

    OK, 'nuff rambling, thanks for listening.
  5. by   Sataria


    I live in Ontario Canada too. I haven't started my nursing education, but after reading this board for a few days, I must say I am getting very nervous and may not even pursue a nursing career. Why? Because I wanted to take the three year diploma program offered at the community college, but I was too late registering for the September 2001 intake, which is the last intake for diploma nursing in Ontario.

    So, instead I will be waiting until 2002 to take the BScN offered at the university. I could probably get in to the BScN this year, but I can't afford it yet. After reading this board and hearing how unqualified BScN's are, I wonder if it is even worth pusuing. Why, if BScN's are less prepared, would they set the standard at a minimum requirement for BScN's for all nurses registering after Dec. 31 2004?

    This standard was determined with input from nurses already in the field. Yet, I keep hearing on this board big arguments for and against minimum standards, and infighting about who is more qualified, has more clinical experience etc..

    I currently work as a bartender, and I thought there was alot of cattieness amongst women in this job, but we get along great compared to what I have witnessed on the board.

    Don't get me wrong, I have enjoyed reading this board and there is alot of great advice, and for the most part an understanding atmosphere, but I am really second guessing whether I want to go into this setting. I am NOT second guessing about wanting to be a nurse, and caring for people, just everything else that goes with it.

    I don't want to spend four years of my life, not to mention the Ca$h ,getting my BScN only to go into what I know I would love to do and have everyonr think I am some snot because I had to go to university through no choice of my own.

    OK, 'nuff rambling, thanks for listening.

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