Can Someone Be a Nurse Without Jean Watson?? - page 32

Ok now, as I delve back INTO nursing philosophy and theories, I come across, again, the theories of Jean Watson that have been hailed as the greatest thing since polyurethane IV bags - The Caring... Read More

  1. by   talaxandra
    Quote from november17
    This lady actually came up in a class discussion one time when I was in nursing school. Several of my fellow students spoke up and were speaking in class about how women are better nurses because they care more. Obviously, because they are women, they had some deep well of caring, that I, as a male, do not have access to. According to them, women are compassionate while men are not. The nursing instructor didn't say a word.
    I was the only male in my class, and I just sat there mortified.

    While I certainly think her theory is useful to the art of nursing, I don't think think it adds 2 drops of anything to the science of it.
    I think that's ridiculous! Some of the best nurses I've ever worked with have been men, and some of the best nurses I've worked with haven't Cared (in the Watsonian touchy feely way) about their patients at all. Convere=sely, one of the worst nurses I've ever worked with was all about the caring and communing but seven kinds of useless, especially in an emergency.

    Plus, if all these students were so invested in caring they'd have noticed that their congratulating themselves based on no attribute or skill but the fluke of gender was closing out one of their own - you. I'm so sorry you had this experience.

    I don't think reinforcing identity roles based on gender is helpful, useful, relevant or even accurate. Some men are capable of deep caring, some women aren't, and neither has much to do with whether or not one's a good nurse. I agree about the art of nursing versus the science of it, too.

    I know this thread's 7 years old but clearly still controversial.
  2. by   nursemike
    Quote from november17
    This lady actually came up in a class discussion one time when I was in nursing school. Several of my fellow students spoke up and were speaking in class about how women are better nurses because they care more. Obviously, because they are women, they had some deep well of caring, that I, as a male, do not have access to. According to them, women are compassionate while men are not. The nursing instructor didn't say a word.
    I was the only male in my class, and I just sat there mortified.

    While I certainly think her theory is useful to the art of nursing, I don't think think it adds 2 drops of anything to the science of it.

    Just my opinion.
    I hear from patients pretty regularly that male nurses are more compassionate, gentler, and more competent. It isn't true, by the way, no matter how nice it is to hear. I do think not many little boys grow up thinking, I want to be a nurse, someday, then get into it and find it wasn't what they expected. Guys who get into nursing have made a conscious choice to swim against the current, which may tend to filter out the guys who don't have what it takes. Still, the process of becoming a nurse is hard, and women who succeed in becoming nurses have also overcome considerable adversity to do so.

    An argument could be made that since guys are less attuned to their emotions, they're able to be a bit more detached, and maybe less inclined to bring their personal problems to work. Sounds plausible on paper, but it also doesn't hold up in the real world. I try hard to stay centered and not let problems at home interfere with my job. Well, I usually don't have a lot of problems at home, but that has more to do with being 53 than being male. As you get older, your life gets more settled, usually. And I also try hard not to get so emotionally invested in my patients that I can't be effective. Some of their stories are very sad, and I feel sad for them. Some are PITAs, and they annoy me, but I don't hate them. Sometimes--maybe all the time--they have fairly good reasons for being PITAs, and while that's not my fault, I can try to understand. But part of what it takes to stay on an even keel is being attuned to my emotions. And one of the things I most enjoy about working with the women I work with is that they're strong. A good nurse has to be able to access his feminine side and her masculine side.

    I interpret the feedback I get from patients to be that they are more likely to notice a male nurse who cares. It's something they don't really expect, and it sticks with them. Similarly, they're more apt to notice the occassional female who doesn't care. The ones who are smart, dedicated, and compassionate get taken for granted, because they're following the stereotype. The occassional male who acts like a jerk--well, that's no surprise, so it doesn't attract as much attention.

    I dunno. You can theorize all day long. What I've actually seen is that the very best nurses I know are almost all women. Women who've been nurses for decades. The handful of males I've seen with decades of experience are also damned good nurses. Most of the worst nurses I've seen have also been women, but the very worst of all was a male. Most of the male nurses I've known have been decent, caring, competent guys working their way toward expertise. So are most of the females. Pick any type of nurse you want, and most of them are female. Geez, I'm feeling a bit outnumbered.

    I can't think of a guy on my unit I would want to be my nurse, but only because I am a nurse, so the last think I want is for someone to be my nurse. If you need someone to be your nurse, you're sick, and that sucks. But if I had to have a nurse, any guy on my unit would be fine. I can think of a couple of gals I wouldn't feel so confident with, but that's out of a much larger sample. 100% of five guys is a much smaller absolute number than 95% of fifty gals (which, I believe, would be 47.5 gals, neatly accounting for two I wouldn't trust and one I'm not sure about.)

    In conclusion, I have no conclusions about male nurses vs. female nurses, except that they do have us fairly severely outnumbered. Well, that, and I do stand by my belief that if there were more male nurses, there would be a lot less stress and only slightly higher patient mortality. But as far as the poster's classroom discussion, I will say that if engineering school was no more relevant to engineering than nursing school is to nursing, I'd be typing this by candlelight and walking to work. (Although, the engineers I've known have also said they didn't know diddly until they'd been on the job awhile...)
  3. by   madwife2002
    I have worked with a manager who thinks she is Jean Watson but in reality she was nothing like what JW preaches.
  4. by   Karynica, RN
    Who is Jean Watson? I graduated 15 years ago as an RN and haven't a clue who she is.
  5. by   tferdaise
    Jean Watson is a nursing Theorist, in most ADN programs, Nursing Theory isn't a class that is tought, that is taught in BSN programs. Each BSN program follows a certain nursing theory, all hospitals follow a certain nursing theory. My BSN program follows Dortha Orem.


    Quote from porcelina
    Who is Jean Watson? I graduated 15 years ago as an RN and haven't a clue who she is.
  6. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from dawngloves
    ]
    That's OK. I'm in the U.S. and I've never heard of her!:imbar Although my therory classes were very early in the morning.....

    LOL - I think she's still alive!
  7. by   PostOpPrincess
    You can be a nurse without the theory.

    But to be a good nurse? Yeah, empathy and caring is a must.

    If you're in it for the "money", it shows....
  8. by   tferdaise
    Each University uses a different thoeriest, mine is Dortha Orem, her theory is simple, if you are admitted to the hospital then you have a Self Care defiect" pretty simple in my book.



    Quote from JoPACURN
    You can be a nurse without the theory.

    But to be a good nurse? Yeah, empathy and caring is a must.

    If you're in it for the "money", it shows....
  9. by   PostOpPrincess
    Quote from tferdaise
    Each University uses a different thoeriest, mine is Dortha Orem, her theory is simple, if you are admitted to the hospital then you have a Self Care defiect" pretty simple in my book.
    Even my hospital system uses Watson. Their problem is that they didn't take the generational differences into consideration.
  10. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from JoPACURN
    You can be a nurse without the theory.

    But to be a good nurse? Yeah, empathy and caring is a must.

    If you're in it for the "money", it shows....
    You can be empathetic and caring without the theory.
  11. by   nursemike
    Quote from tferdaise
    Each University uses a different thoeriest, mine is Dortha Orem, her theory is simple, if you are admitted to the hospital then you have a Self Care defiect" pretty simple in my book.
    Nursing theories are probably useful as food for thought, and maybe moreso for starting discussions, but in general I think they tend to complicate that which is simple and over-simplify that which is complicated. I've learned more about empathy from my cats than any nursing theory (they're nonverbal, but very communicative, and while I do talk to them, they comprehend only a very limited vocabulary and are far more interested in how I say than what I say).

    I can't call Dortha Orem readily to mind. We covered several nursing theories during about half of one four-hour lecture, and I may have dozed off once or twice. But as characterized by the poster, it is indeed pretty simple. So a 104 y.o. female admitted for a CVA has a self-care deficit. If only she had taken care of herself, she might have made 204. And that 55 y.o. with the AVM, I told him smoking was no good.

    I'm not opposed to theory. I was a physics major, once upon a time. But some "nursing leaders" seem determined to make nursing something it isn't. As sciences go, ours is about as emprical as they come, and I really don't see a problem with that.
    Last edit by nursemike on Sep 14, '09 : Reason: I do seen a problem with my typing at 2150 in the morning
  12. by   Cyn2school
    I agree with you Q, Jean Watson is a scary person linked to Mariann Williams and other touchy feely new agey sort of thought. It was nauseating to have to waste an hour of school on her.
  13. by   bobarb
    I personally am past the point of caring about my patients.....just don't want to harm them. And quite frankly, working in ICU and ER, I must do an OK job because I get many cards and letters sent to mgmt. thanking me....I think my assessment skills and technical skills are more important than "caring"........and I always thought the nursing care plans and nursing theory courses were just made up by MSN and PhD's anyway...and, I, too, do not know jWatson.!

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