"Can I take one of your patients for this one?" "No! And I resent your asking!" - page 5

by Saiderap 7,606 Views | 49 Comments

Listen to this debate from one work place. "I don't have any I feel like trading." "I don't want to, "give up," any of them." "She just asked you to do something really easy!" "If I find out she had to take... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from sbelz79
    OK, so you are talking about a client who has dementia- yeah, trying to address the client to ask them to change their behavior isn't really an option there.

    But it sounds like you're working in a somewhat hostile environment, if your coworkers seem to be taking pleasure from watching you take abuse from a client.



    Agreed. That is totally unprofessional behavior. If they didn't want to trade with you, they shouldn't have done it. After agreeing to trade, they should have taken full responsibility for the assignment and not brought any of the workplace drama into the client's room.



    I really don't think that whether or not you like a patient should affect the care you give them. I would certainly prefer to be taken care of by someone who is kind to me rather than someone who is cold indifferent or downright rude- but learning to be kind, compassionate and caring towards people who you do not like is part of learning to be a good nurse.

    By the way, what type of setting are you working in? Are you working in a nursing home?
    What I've been describing in this thread was in a nursing home. Their staffs seem to be known for immaturity.
    I know at least one book that's been written about it which is now out of print.

    When I've worked for home nursing agencies and ask them not to send me back to a certain client, they are usually much kinder than in the nursing home. One scheduler was reprimanded for making me go back to a
    client who I had asked not to see.
  2. 0
    Quote from Saiderap
    What I've been describing in this thread was in a nursing home. Their staffs seem to be known for immaturity.
    I know at least one book that's been written about it which is now out of print.

    When I've worked for home nursing agencies and ask them not to send me back to a certain client, they are usually much kinder than in the nursing home. One scheduler was reprimanded for making me go back to a
    client who I had asked not to see.
    It seems that when it comes to senior care in general, not much emphasis is put on quality of care by the management companies responsible for administration. I've never worked in a skilled nursing facility, but in assisted living and memory care, the training is bare-bones and they'll often hire just about anyone off the street (at least just about everyone in a nursing home has to be certified either as an RN, CNA or certified medication aide). Maybe the maturity issue is related to nursing homes being more willing to hire nurses fresh out of school than other clinical settings? I don't know, just a guess. In any case, that's an issue that could be addressed with a good solid initial and ongoing training regimen, But that would cost $$, and the investors have to get their cut of the action, no? Who cares if clients are receiving good care as long as Mr. Moneybags can afford to buy a new BMW every two years.

    When it comes to home nursing, it definitely makes sense to me to take care to pair nurses with clients who are a good fit for them, because there is no one there to step in and help out if there are problems.
    Last edit by Boognish on Jul 1, '10
  3. 0
    Quote from sbelz79
    I think that it indicates a need for further training when people feel wholly unequipped to deal with certain situations
    That's my opinion in a nutshell.

    OP, it sounds like you do a lot of trading. I think there is something wrong with this picture.
  4. 0
    Quote from klone
    That's my opinion in a nutshell.

    OP, it sounds like you do a lot of trading. I think there is something wrong with this picture.


    For over a year, I was trading only one patient out of fifty. The others liked this one so most times they did not mind helping me. They knew they could give me one of theirs if they had to.
    Last edit by Saiderap on Jul 1, '10 : Reason: readability
  5. 0
    Quote from klone
    That's my opinion in a nutshell.

    OP, it sounds like you do a lot of trading. I think there is something wrong with this picture.

    It makes a difference if you're feeling slighted and annoyed by a patient or if you're feeling violated on a deep level. Sometimes when they talk about more training, it really should enter into therapy. If health care staffs had
    therapy groups, it might increase the number of pateints they could handle and at the same time would make them see why trading can be good.
    One day I was play-acting with another caregiver and I was supposed to tell her, "No."
    She said, "This one raped me one time, can you trade with me?" I said, "We'll work together on him." In this case, does someone really need more training or is getting someone off your group a healthy reaction?
  6. 0
    Quote from Saiderap
    It makes a difference if you're feeling slighted and annoyed by a patient or if you're feeling violated on a deep level.
    And does this happen to you often?

    And I'm sorry, but who hasn't felt slighted or annoyed by a pt? Deal with it! It's part of the job.
  7. 0
    Quote from klone
    And does this happen to you often?

    And I'm sorry, but who hasn't felt slighted or annoyed by a pt? Deal with it! It's part of the job.

    Let me try to re-phrase this.

    I said, "It makes a difference if you're feeling slighted and annoyed with a patient or if you're feeling violated on a deep level." What I was trying to say is in behalf of nurses who have been deeply violated by their patients and when the patient is literally a threat to their welfare and a threat to their mental health. What would you say to a staff member if a patient on her list had committed a criminal
    act against her? I would not just tell them to, "deal with it."


    "Any patient who verbally abuses or threatens you, or sexually harasses or touches you is a criminal! Talk to your supervisor first,but if that does work,call your local police and press charges. Several states now have laws which protect nurses from these criminals." Originally posted by montroyal
    http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...use-49107.html
    Last edit by Saiderap on Jul 3, '10 : Reason: readability
  8. 0
    Quote from Saiderap
    What would you say to a staff member if a patient on her list had committed a criminal
    act against her? I would not just tell them to, "deal with it." [/URL]
    If you would reread what I said, you would see I said "deal with it" in response to feeling "slighted or annoyed" by a pt. But feel free to twist my words in order to bolster your argument.
  9. 0
    not only nurses but also doctors have patients who they need to stop seeing to protect themselves.

    " this review is from: i know you really love me: a psychiatrist's account of stalking ... i disagree strongly with one statement in the book, from page 224;" ... "the stalking problem belongs to the victim."
    [color=#0e774a]www.amazon.com/review/r127thumplq4yv


    in the same way as they describe this, so do some other problems belong to the patient and not the caregiver and sometimes it is appropriate not to give care to just anyone.
  10. 0
    Quote from PureLifeRN
    Your post is extremely hard to read, FYI. Did you mean to break it up into stanzas, like a poem?
    I thought if you have multiple sentences with quoted dialogue and no "he said, or "he asked" the proper form was to put one quote per line and double space between each line. Maybe it was different when you read it.


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