'Borderline' students?

  1. Ok, this is a vent.

    In school, we have to participate in a survey about predicted college success vs home support systems, class load, work hours, etc. This is to receive a grant, and those funds will be allocated to help 'borderline' students succeed.

    Borderline students? As in the students who can't pull off a 75 on an exam if their lives depended on it? These are the students we want to try to help graduate and be out on the workforce? I think its wrong to relax the standards and help those less intellectually focused to pass the program knowing that they will never pass boards and, if they do sneak through, they'll be horribly unsafe nurses.

    Its bad enough that the minimum score on the ACT is a 20. One of my friends in school is in the program, right beside me, and scored an 18. ***** What is the point of having standards if everyone doesn't have to adhere to them?

    But no, now they are seeking money to hire special tutors and create college success courses for the students who can't seem to pass.

    What do you think? There are admission standards, ongoing standards, for a reason... to 'weed out' the people who can't make it. Why cater to them, make it easy for them to pass, knowing they'll never be successful? To collect more tuition dollars? Improve their numbers of graduating students? It certainly won't improve the nclex pass rate.

    People say I'm too hard on others. Ok, whatever. I do not want to work beside a borderline student who can't figure out a simple dosage calculation or doesn't know the difference between DI and DM.

    Grrrr!
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  2. 105 Comments

  3. by   Shamrock
    Hmmmm, I know some kick-*^% nurses that struggled
    somewhat in the academic setting. I also know some nurses that excelled in academics but don't know their right foot from their left hand. My thoughts are that I would not want to work with judgemental people.
  4. by   ShandyLynnRN
    Originally posted by Shamrock
    Hmmmm, I know some kick-*^% nurses that struggled
    somewhat in the academic setting. I also know some nurses that excelled in academics but don't know their right foot from their left hand. My thoughts are that I would not want to work with judgemental people.
    I agree. I would hate to think that just because someone has difficulty learning, that they wouldn't be given a chance. I know many nurses that didn't do well in school, barely squeaked by, yet they are excellent in bedside care.

    Then there are those that did great in school, and think they are better than everyone else. Just because they got a 4.0 GPA.
  5. by   delirium
    If I am being judgmental, I am judging based on the MINIMUM standard promulgated by my college. These aren't my rules.

    Granted, there are some good didactic students that are not so great clinically, but it does a disservice to those of us who are successful in school to suggest that that is the norm, rather than the exception.
  6. by   canoehead
    If someone is willing to spend extra time getting help and working to pass I am willing to spend extra money to help someone that shows commitment. But I agree that if standards are set and people don't live up to them we needs to enforce them.
  7. by   ShandyLynnRN
    ok, I guess I need to clarify my opinion. Yes, I think students should be given every chance possible to succeed. But there are those that think that their education be "given" to them rather than working hard like everyone else. Those are the people that I would fear working with.

    And no, I don't think it's fair to have standards differ. If the Standard is for a 20 on the ACT, then everyone needs to have a minimum of 20. If the standard is 75% to pass, then they should only pass with 75%.

    But I also think that if those students that are struggling would find someone to work with and find out what their learning problems are, it might help.

    Maybe they are working and expect special treatment?
  8. by   delirium
    I work full time, and I don't receive or expect special treatment. I turn in my assignments on the same day as everyone else. We are evaluated on our performance in clinical and by examination, regardless of extra-academic activities.

    I guess its the attitude of entitlement that I don't like. Encouraging students who fail to meet the minimum standard on the ACT, who fail to achieve the minimum score of 75 on the exams...catering to them, coddling them, helping them along.

    For the record, I don't like to see people fail. In fact, I help people that are struggling when I can, I encourage them to feel good about themselves and to expect success, yada yada yada. I just think there should be a limit. There are people that have been trying to pass this program for 9-10 years and they continue to readmit them every semester. It doesn't make sense. At some point there should be an action plan, a meeting with someone, something, instead of blindly readmitting someone to a program that he or she cannot independently pass.
  9. by   EmeraldNYL
    Hmmm.... this is a toughie. I do think students should be given extra support (tutoring, extra reviews) if they need it and are willing to make the effort, but I certainly don't think standards should be lowered for some people simply because schools want the tuition money or because there's such a nursing shortage or whatever. Ideally, students should be weeded out in the admissions process rather than getting accepted, struggling, and flunking out. We just lost about 8 people from my program and I think this may be due to the fact that admission standards were not quite high enough.
  10. by   ShandyLynnRN
    9-10 years??? you've gotta be kidding me!
  11. by   delirium
    I wish I were kidding, Shandy. I'm not. There's one woman in my clinical group who has been at this since 1992.

    Clue phone? Its for somebody. Something isn't working for her. I've heard other programs where if you fail, you can take it again, and if you fail again, that's it. That makes more sense. I can only admire this woman's dogged perserverence, because I sure wouldn't be trying to pass a 3 year program for 11 years.
  12. by   Shamrock
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by delirium
    [B] I just think there should be a limit. There are people that have been trying to pass this program for 9-10 years and they continue to readmit them every semester.

    Sounds VERY extreme to me!!
  13. by   EmeraldNYL
    Wow that is crazy, in my program you have 2 chances to pass a class, and after that, PEACE OUT.
  14. by   delirium
    Are you sure I'm not being judgmental?

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