Any FUN nursing Jobs?

  1. Okay, maybe this is asking a bit much...but I want to know if anyone is having any fun doing their job? Does anyone love to go to work? I don't mean they like it more than anything else in the world. Just tell me what you are doing or have done that is enjoyable, fun, funny... etc.
    Thanks,
    still searching for my nitch, Bessie
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   Charles S. Smith, RN, MS
    Originally posted by Bessie:
    <STRONG>Okay, maybe this is asking a bit much...but I want to know if anyone is having any fun doing their job? Does anyone love to go to work? I don't mean they like it more than anything else in the world. Just tell me what you are doing or have done that is enjoyable, fun, funny... etc.
    Thanks,
    still searching for my nitch, Bessie</STRONG>
    Yes, I absolutely enjoy going to work. As an independent contractor in a professional practice group, I have choice in my life and career now. I have multiple options for every day and I love it!

    chas
  4. by   ornurse2001
    I enjoy my job well when there is something to do.I work in a small, rural hospital that is struggling to stay alive.I work in Surgery, but today for instance , we have one lap-chole and 2 LPN's and 3 RN's with which to do it.BORING.I am leaving this position soon to take a travel assignment and really excited about working in new places-seeing new people and learning new things.We'll see!
  5. by   MollyJ
    If I didn't have "fun" at my job, I would never work there. However, in nursing, fun is a by-product rather than the main, sought intent. I have fun with the students I work with, the staff I get to meet, my colleagues, other people I network with in my job. It happens many times unexpectedly.

    You don't say what you do. In nursing, there has to be a certain willingness to experience some of the real painful things that we see along the way. To "sit with the pain" as the psych folks say it. If you are seeking "fun" to avoid that experience, there isn't probably enough fun in the world to go around. And I don't even know you, so I am not saying that is the deal here. But nursing IS pretty serious business, as we all know. I think those of us that like our jobs know how to look for the fun, but as I have posted before, if it isn't fun and rewarding at some point, I wouldn't stick around for it. Maybe you do need to keep going to find that niche.

    Good luck.
  6. by   Charles S. Smith, RN, MS
    Originally posted by MollyJ:
    <STRONG>If I didn't have "fun" at my job, I would never work there. However, in nursing, fun is a by-product rather than the main, sought intent. I have fun with the students I work with, the staff I get to meet, my colleagues, other people I network with in my job. It happens many times unexpectedly.

    You don't say what you do. In nursing, there has to be a certain willingness to experience some of the real painful things that we see along the way. To "sit with the pain" as the psych folks say it. If you are seeking "fun" to avoid that experience, there isn't probably enough fun in the world to go around. And I don't even know you, so I am not saying that is the deal here. But nursing IS pretty serious business, as we all know. I think those of us that like our jobs know how to look for the fun, but as I have posted before, if it isn't fun and rewarding at some point, I wouldn't stick around for it. Maybe you do need to keep going to find that niche.

    Good luck.</STRONG>
    Super insight as usual MollyJ! Finding one's niche is critical for all of life's opportunities. Coaching is a great way to help find niches and to bring about new meaning to a "stuck in a rut" or "boring" career. Professional and Personal Life Coaching has been critical to my success and I offer it as an option to other nurses. As an Integrative Coach, I work with nurses to find those niches. If any of you want info, see my website under the profile section. I offer complimentary sessions for nurses to find out about coaching and find out about themselves!

    regards
    chas

    [ June 13, 2001: Message edited by: Charles S. Smith, RN, MS ]
  7. by   Sharon
    I have a lot of fun at my job. And my message is long because I enjoy my profession. I do integrated disability and consult on occupational, environmental, and disaster health. I get the funniest situations to review. For instance the baker who didn’t want to shave his beard after National Guard duty because he had a “contagious infectious disease on his face and was using Gyne-Lotrimin.” I enjoyed explaining to the unemployment hearing examiner what was wrong with the paperwork.

    In addition to the humor I get to spend a lot of time assisting people successfully through the healthcare system. One of the more recent successes involved a mother who had to have extensive abdominal surgery (reoccurring ventral hernia and vaginal cancer) the day after her teenage daughter who had just given birth with urosepsis and had to have a protein renal calculi removed. With both hospitalized in two different hospitals, none of the hospital staff, insurance staff, local community health or numerous doctors offices had bothered to assist them with getting appropriate pre-certification, post hospital care or care for the 7 day old newborn. What information the mother had gotten was incorrect and wasted much of her time before hospitalization with inappropriate errands and tasks.

    One of my daily tasks is to assist people who are frustrated with their healthcare. 50% of the time is because they have gotten no explanation or very little as to why things are or are not being done. For instance the teenager was informed her urine protein level would have to be checked every month for the rest of her life. But no one had explained why and what the outcome could be if it was elevated too long or that routine blood work would not pick up the problem until extensive renal damage had occurred. Nor was she told to tell her Ob, especially if she was pregnant later.

    The other 50% and their doctors have been looking at the trees too long and have missed the Amazon when trying to find a diagnosis. I have had two cases where the doctors where treating arm pain/numbness and even the neurologist and neurosurgeons did not do x-rays for a couple of months, until I insisted. Once chest x-rays were done both were diagnosed with lung cancer and mets to the neck.
  8. by   Janet Barclay
    I have fun just about every day that I go to work I am a unit manager in ICU and the people that work with me are intense, hard working and funny as hell. We made a plaster pig for the educators the other night (long story) At least one person has a water pistol on any given day Aside from the fact that I really love my job, I really love the folks that I work with
  9. by   cjp
    I am an asthma educator/asthma care managerfor a multispecialty clinic. I love it! I work closely with an allergist and get referals from primary care including pediatrics. It is very challenging and rewarding especially when the patients come back for folow up and you can actually see the results. I have recently gotten referals from day care centers, school nurses and nursing units at he local hospital to come in and talk about asthma care and asthma management.
  10. by   nurs4kids
    Absolutely love it! My coworkers are wonderful and the patients are awesome. Like anything, there's a few bad points to nursing...but like anything in life, you take the good with the bad!
  11. by   imaRN
    Fun at work?
    Well why else would you go?
    You can make "anything" fun, of course it does help to have a twisted sense of humor, that we in ICU have (did we develop it or were we born with it)
    That is the Question...If I gave "details" someone might not understand......don't want to offend anyone ....imaRN
  12. by   Bessie
    Thanks for all the responses!

    I can take the good with the bad in any job. However, the bad in nursing can be soooo bad...death, dismemberment, abuse...and on and on. I do need to develop some resistance to the bad, so I don't cry so much. Every clinical rotation I had, I encountered some patient situation that made me cry. My instructors all tell me that I will not cry so much after a while and that my sensitivity will make me a good nurse. I hope they are right!

    I just wanted to be assured that people goof off and have a good time at work sometimes.

    I also wanted to know what type of nursing you do. I am still trying to decide in what area I want my first job. And to be quite honest...I am little SCARED! Not of the Docs or other nurses. I don't want to harm any patient.
    Bessie
  13. by   MollyJ
    Originally posted by Bessie:
    <STRONG>Thanks for all the responses!

    I can take the good with the bad in any job. However, the bad in nursing can be soooo bad...death, dismemberment, abuse...and on and on. I do need to develop some resistance to the bad, so I don't cry so much. Every clinical rotation I had, I encountered some patient situation that made me cry. My instructors all tell me that I will not cry so much after a while and that my sensitivity will make me a good nurse. I hope they are right!

    Bessie</STRONG>
    Bessie, you have gotten to the heart of what makes nursing so hard sometimes. Every time I have started a new clinical endeavour and didn't yet have my "calluses" in place, I was struck with breath-taking clarity by the painfulness of what patients and their families were experiencing. This still happens and I have been in the business 23 years.

    Our challenge in nursing is to feel our feelings but not become immobilized by them. (A constantly crying, immobilized nurse doesn't help the patient.) At the center of our sadness for our patients and ourselves, we can find simple sadness for what is happening to another, fear about our own mortality, feelings of helplessness when we cannot fix it or entirely make it better, anger at our patients for not getting better or for doing things that make them sick (smoke, drink and drive, go off their diets), helplessness when witnessing a family's life change in a single event [death or disability of any member], identification with patients that are like us or our families and the list could go on and on. All of these feelings are over whelming and at times we just want relief from them. Some nurses take relief in gallows humor--oh let us be honest--we ALL take relief in gallows humor AT TIMES. That is the twisted sense of humor that you see day in and day out in any hospital unit and best exemplified on the program M*A*S*H.

    Some days, I come home from my job angry and appalled at what so many American children go through in their families. In my previous case management job, I was almost daily horrified by the extreme suffering of my families so artfully prolonged by the skills of modern day medicine. You as a student nurse are building your skills and being exposed to a panopoly of suffering in a rapid sequence as you go from clinical speciality to clinical specialty. And yet, you don't get to _stick around long enough_ to see that families adapt, patients get better, people find silver linings in their clouds.

    Gallow's humor, aforementioned, is a great temporary tool and not to be disregarded but many of us will start to evolve some spiritual belief system to help us cope. Poor coping with the pain and suffering can lead to burn out. So I am saying, just as it is important to learn how to give an IM injection, take time to learn some coping skills with what you see and experience in the world around you.

    The experienced nurses here will write things about how they cope with the sadness and the pain. I think number one would be "talking with another nurse." As someone I know said to me as a new GN, "Your family doesn't want to hear this. They want to think their doctor and hospital are perfect and that all outcomes are good." Another one is to accept that suffering is a real part of life and that, though we can alleviate it [and often do], we cannot eliminate it. Another coping method is to take good care of yourself--good sleep habits, good dietary habits, have hobbies and activities that are not nursing related (particularly hard to do when you are a student nurse). Try meditation. Accept that, at some point, we are not in charge here and not all things are in our control. If you have a faith tradition, look at what it says about pain and suffering and death.
    Learn the Serenity Prayer (God grant me the Serenity to accept the things I cannot change, Courage to change those I can and the Wisdom to know the difference.)

    The fact is, the things you witness are sad and tragic and sometimes unnecessary. But they would happen whether you were there or not and, by being there, you have a chance to alleviate pain, help someone do it better next time, move them toward a behavior change that will change their life in a positive way, help them learn a new skill that will make them better. The act of caring says to a patient, "You are worth being cared for!" We are honored to be the purveyors of that message. At the end of EVERY DAY give yourself credit for something you did well.

    You are obviously a tender-spirited person and maybe young? so you are being immersed in pains and problems your non-nursing peers cannot even imagine. Grow some coping skills, but don't stop feeling.
  14. by   Zee_RN
    I, too, love ICU nursing. It is hard work but I really ENJOY taking care of a critically ill patient who really needs ICU care and makes you use all that knowledge and skill you've accumulated over the years. Things that force you into high gear--pt. requiring immediate intubation, cardiac arrests, rapid falling BP, etc.--that you are able to jump into and make things happen--that's fun! Heck, I love a good code (more so when it's someone else's patient, mind you ). Adrenaline junkie? Maybe.

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