"Safe Injection Houses"- What's This?" - page 4

A "safe house" for drug users to use drugs with clean equipment and trained professional supervision using public funding.....what the what????!!! Am I reading this correctly? This instantly... Read More

  1. by   Steph41
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    It may not be politically correct to say so, but I think this is a horrible idea. Maybe we should provide "safety escorts" for people while they rob businesses to get their drug money, too.
    I agree.
  2. by   payitforward
    I just don't know. It's almost like drug use is being condoned,you know? Mixed feelings!
  3. by   Bandaide
    Keep in mind that it's to their benefit not to find any crime. How about users who can't get a chair in the place in time for their next fix? They end up on the doorstep of a nearby business or home.

    Now Seattle is talking about providing "clean" drugs for the addicts to use, free of charge. What is wrong with this picture? How about providing free drug treatment instead?
  4. by   rncher1994
    They already get free drug treatment.
  5. by   GaryRay
    Quote from squishyfish
    Nope, nope, nope, nope. Why are we rewarding dangerous and addictive behaviors with zero consequences? This sounds like such a bad idea.
    It isn't being rewarded.... it's being isolated. They aren't buying drugs there they are doing drugs there, supervised, by people trained to respond to emergencies.

    I would like to partially retract my previous post. I didn't see the part about them being non-licenced trained volunteers. We aren't dealing with the nursing and medical ethics of promoting drug use. It's an organization preventing harm.

    I'll say it again. Addiction is a disease. No one wakes up one day aspiring to be an expendable human being.

    Getting every person in who walks through those doors treatment (assuming they are ready and want it) would be much cheaper on our system than the side effects of their disease... But even if we could get the funding we wouldn't have the facilities or practitioners to accomplish this.

    If they inserted, maintained, and provided supplies for each addict to get a PICC line in that injection house it would still cost pennies compared to an uninsured indigent young adult being treated for Hep C on Medicaid. Some of my mother's meds costed $10k per pill. A foundation funds the drugs and each person we prevent from contracting it means someone else who needs the med gets it. Don't forget interferon, liver biopsies, blood work, imaging, and life-long monitoring.

    Come on, we are a highly intelligent and educated population.... let's not act like an issue this big can have an answer that's right or wrong.
  6. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from GaryRay


    Come on, we are a highly intelligent and educated population....
    Frankly, I don't see a lot of evidence for that statement. Unfortunately.

    Perhaps you are referencing the posters on AN, rather than our population at large.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from Horseshoe
    Frankly, I don't see a lot of evidence for that statement. Unfortunately.

    Perhaps you are referencing the posters on AN, rather than our population at large.
    I wouldn't even say it about the general AN population.
  8. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from elkpark
    I wouldn't even say it about the general AN population.
    Well, now that you mention it...
  9. by   Bowie21
    I am a needle exchange nurse, HIV/AIDs certified RN and am a strong supporter of harm reduction for injection drug users. There are nursing organizations in Canada and Europe who have been running needle exchanges and injection sites for many years. Check out Insite in Canada and the documentary Street Nurses about Canadian nurses working with injection drug users. I look forward to seeing more of these sites around the country run by nurses who support harm reduction and understand the utility of needle exchange.
  10. by   GaryRay
    Yes, because a child with leukemia waiting on a bone marrow transplant's family friends community and social circle are completely unaffected.

    And I beg you not to insult your and my intelligence by saying one disease was chosen and the other wasn't.
  11. by   GaryRay
    Quote from Horseshoe
    Frankly, I don't see a lot of evidence for that statement. Unfortunately.

    Perhaps you are referencing the posters on AN, rather than our population at large.
    I guess I'm being too idealistic for my experience level. I have spent the better part of a decade trying to get educated clinicians to accept the application of research evidence to their practice.

    Trying not to give up on our profession in general.
  12. by   bebbercorn
    Safe injection houses keep needles off the streets, can intervene in overdose, and is safer for our most vulnerable populations. Resources can be given for those looking for medically assisted therapy, rehab, or treatment for HIV/Hep C. These are diseases also less likely to be transmitted when clean needles are available. People have been chasing highs forever and they will use drugs if there is a safe space or not. So let's have it. It is a harm reduction method.
  13. by   Nursetom1963
    Quote from KatieMI
    Many of them beg, prostitute themselves and use cheap, low-qualty drugs which kill them quicker and more painful. Real hard vore addicts will do pretty much anything to avoid police because being in custody = withdrawal.

    Since we as society have no tools to force addicts into treatment (which is, in turn, notoriuosly low effective), everything that remains is to make using safer for everyone. This way, at least, you and me, hopefully, won't have those 3 to 6 months of soul-searching after an accident poke with insulin needle waiting for HIV and hep panel "window" to pass.

    Although I too do not support making those "safe houses" pretty much about everywhere, especially near schools and known tourist zones.
    This is as good a quote as any to illustrate why I am against the whole idea; forcing people into recovery doesn't work because it is pointless unless the person wants to recover, I speak from personal experience. Making it easier to do your drug of choice with less risk is called enabling, and delays treatment.

close