**Organ Donation** - page 6

Just wondering if many are registered anywhere? Also, what do you think about this?... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from sjrn85
    That's another thing; using the word "harvest." It depersonalizes the whole situation. It's not like your talking about crops.

    (Not meant directly at the quoted poster...I know that's the lingo transplant people like to use.)
    Well, what would you prefer it to be called? 'Procurement' is another option.

    It's certainly not depersonalized for me, and i'm sorry, but unless you've actually done it, please do not say it's depersonalized. It's hardly that.
  2. by   Bipley
    Quote from sjrn85
    I won't donate, and I dare anyone to try to make me feel bad about it.

    If the process were handled differently, maybe. But I'll give you an example of what turns me off. There's an article in the front page of the paper here about a local man who is waiting for a heart transplant. The article says something like, "While some people wait for the sound of sleigh bells for Santa to bring presents, "John" scans the sky looking for the helicopter which will bring him a new heart for Christmas."

    Gee...ain't that sweet. "I hope somebody dies so I get to live." The media does this every year at this time. It sickens me. I don't think half the people who read this stuff put the dots together and figure out that this means tragedy for some other family, who then has to endure people badgering them (overtly/covertly) to donate their loved one's organs. I hated having to deal with the organ procurement organization in my area; when you'd tell them about a family who didn't want to donate, they'd act like it was your fault. If the pt. died and was quite elderly/ill, they'd act irritated you called. Hey, you guys made the rules, not me.

    To be clear, I would not accept an organ, either. I don't think that would be fair.
    I see your point but in all honesty, I think I see a different part of the picture.

    Pfizer. I hate that company with a passion. I don't like the way they do business (veterinary side of business), I don't like their history, I don't like anything about that company. Yet if someone in my family becomes ill and they have some unique drug out there should my family member die because I don't like a part of the entire process?

    Sure, there are problems within the system of organ donations but considering the majority of recipients are not as you describe and good people get to live, it's not a horrible system.

    I'll put people's lives over my attitudes any 'ol day. If I don't like something I'm the first one to jump in and change it if I can but I am darn sure not going to let people die just because everything isn't perfect yet. Not if there was something I could do. Too many people are dying waiting for organs.
  3. by   sjrn85
    Quote from chris_at_lucas_RN
    I'm always curious when someone is as passionately against something that might help someone live....

    If the donor is dead, what difference does it make whether his organs help someone else or just rot?

    I'll tell you. Family members of the donor can feel something positive has come from what certainly was a horrible event in their lives. Recipients can give good things to those around them, for a little while longer (or a lot longer).

    You certainly don't have to donate--I'd be the last one to try to talk you into it. But why the sarcasm? Why (apparently) try to talk others out of it?
    I wasn't being sarcastic. Any time someone posts about not being willing to be a donor, that person is usually treated to numerous posts ranging from righteous indignation to major attempts a guilt-trips. That's why I said that I dared anyone to try.

    I'm just as entitled to my feelings about not being willing to donate. For those who are...terrific. You should feel good about it. It's just not for me, and it doesn't make me a bad/selfish person.
  4. by   sjrn85
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Well, what would you prefer it to be called? 'Procurement' is another option.

    It's certainly not depersonalized for me, and i'm sorry, but unless you've actually done it, please do not say it's depersonalized. It's hardly that.
    Don't assume I haven't been involved in the process. I was expressing my view that I feel the word is a way of buffering what is happening. If you'd read my post more carefully, you'd have seen that 1) I specifically stated I wasn't taking issue with you, personally, and; 2) I have been involved in organ "procurement" or whatever you're comfortable calling it. Maybe my exp. in the ED is different than yours in the OR, but it isn't of lesser impact.
  5. by   sjrn85
    Quote from Bipley
    I see your point but in all honesty, I think I see a different part of the picture.

    Pfizer. I hate that company with a passion. I don't like the way they do business (veterinary side of business), I don't like their history, I don't like anything about that company. Yet if someone in my family becomes ill and they have some unique drug out there should my family member die because I don't like a part of the entire process?

    Sure, there are problems within the system of organ donations but considering the majority of recipients are not as you describe and good people get to live, it's not a horrible system.

    I'll put people's lives over my attitudes any 'ol day. If I don't like something I'm the first one to jump in and change it if I can but I am darn sure not going to let people die just because everything isn't perfect yet. Not if there was something I could do. Too many people are dying waiting for organs.
    If I were willing to accept a transplant, I would see that I would have more of an obligation to be willing to donate. But I'm not willing to accept a transplant, for reasons I don't feel I should be compelled to enumerate. So forgive me if I don't want to participate in the process.

    I'm done with this. I knew there would be a bunch of negative responses to what I said, but apparently I am not alone, since according to the poll, there were several other people who felt the same.
  6. by   Bipley
    Quote from sjrn85
    If I were willing to accept a transplant, I would see that I would have more of an obligation to be willing to donate. But I'm not willing to accept a transplant, for reasons I don't feel I should be compelled to enumerate. So forgive me if I don't want to participate in the process.

    I'm done with this. I knew there would be a bunch of negative responses to what I said, but apparently I am not alone, since according to the poll, there were several other people who felt the same.
    Negative response? Where? Care to show me one? Or does disagreeing with you make it a negative response? Actually, everyone here has been quite appropriate and very polite. Nobody has slammed you or insulted you in any way.

    It is very inappropriate to even suggest a thing. It is as though you were waiting for someone to slam you and I feel as though you are disappointed that it didn't happen. Instead everyone has been quite nice.
  7. by   grimmy
    Quote from sjrn85
    that's another thing; using the word "harvest." it depersonalizes the whole situation. it's not like you're talking about crops.

    (not meant directly at the quoted poster...i know that's the lingo transplant people like to use.)
    [font="book antiqua"]its one reason why, at my facility, we all call them "donor" surgeries, regardless of whether or not the donor survives the procedure. while i am well aware of the intricacies and symbolism for the term "harvest," we use donor in deference of family feelings.
  8. by   grimmy
    Quote from marie_lpn
    well, what would you prefer it to be called? 'procurement' is another option.

    it's certainly not depersonalized for me, and i'm sorry, but unless you've actually done it, please do not say it's depersonalized. it's hardly that.

    [font="book antiqua"]i agree - on a certain level. it is procurement, too. for those who assist in donor and recipient surgeries, we take the entire process very seriously. we have feelings, too, and we feel for all of the families.

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