PHRN transfer to EMT-P in other states?

  1. 0
    Hi everyone,
    I'm a PICU nurse and volunteer EMT-B in PA and I'm in the process of getting my Prehospital RN here. I'm currently looking at other PICU/NICU/Pedi ED jobs in PA and TX. If I end up moving to Texas, do you know if I would be able to get my PHRN certification transferred to a paramedic license in Texas. I have an EMT-B license in Texas right now. I don't want all that time/work going into the PHRN exam to go to waste. I'm really just trying to use my license to do more volunteer work at an ALS level.

    Thanks!
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  4. 19 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    I'd contact the TX EMS board.

    You might also ask over at emtlife.com
  6. 0
    Ask the TX Board of EMS and the TX BON to see who regulates nurses in prehospital situations.

    EMTlife probably will not be of much use since that is a forum for mostly EMT Basics and not nurses.
  7. 1
    PHRN is a pretty rare thing. Only a few states have it; so the folks in TX may not know what to do with it. (I don't, either.) Paramedic licenses are governed by the state EMS bureau, so they are the ones you need to speak with. They may not even know what PHRN is. Offhand, the only two states I know of that have this as an actual credential are PA and IL. CA has MICN, which is a little different. If you don't get a positive response from TX EMS bureau, go to them in person when you are there with the credential and curriculum in hand. If they don't transfer it over, maybe they'll let you challenge the EMT-P exam without having to go to school again. Be sure that PHRN included all the paramedic skills like intubation and reading twelve-leads.
    RegMurse12 likes this.
  8. 0
    Thanks for replying everyone. I went to the emslife forum and posted the question. They referred me to the TX EMS board and then started a battle among themselves about why nurses shouldn't be paramedics and vice-versa. Anyways, I emailed them the TX board and I'm waiting for a reply.

    Thanks again!
  9. 0
    Quote from RegMurse12
    Thanks for replying everyone. I went to the emslife forum and posted the question. They referred me to the TX EMS board and then started a battle among themselves about why nurses shouldn't be paramedics and vice-versa.
    If anyone wants an entertaining read:
    http://www.emtlife.com/showthread.php?t=33913
  10. 0
    lol - I'm a PHRN in IL on a volunteer squad and even in states where PHRNs exist (and I've been one since 1999) there is still confusion.
  11. 1
    I hope nobody takes any information on that forum seriously. Most of those commenting on education have only a 3 - 6 month certificate as a Paramedic and no college. Not even an Associates. They regularly bash anyone with education and are very outspoken against RNs, NPs and PAs. Strange how someone with a 6 month cert from a medic mill can criticize a nurse with a Masters or Doctorate. Unless you have actually taken college level A&P and Pharmacology courses, you will probably not know how little you do know. It is also no surprise that most instructors for EMTs and Paramedics do not hold an Associates degree. There will always be a bias against those with education.

    For a nurse to transition to a certificate level course it should not be that difficult. A few new skills and additional algorithms are not that big of a deal if you have a strong foundation. Experience, past, present and future should be considered. This should be no different than an RN training another area of the hospital be it HBO, CCU, ECMO, ER, PICU, NICU, Onocology etc. We could also include those who intubate in the delivery room or do US. There is a transition period with educaiton and training but there is also respect for the education and experience as an RN. You also don't have to change your profession and can still be an RN.

    In a perfect world, no RN should ever have to change their profession or totally give up their identity as an RN to work as a "Paramedic". Cardiovascular RNs don't give up their identity to work in a position where there are also CV Technologists.

    Each state should have a prehospital credential and path for RNs who have the education and experience. No RN who has the experience and knowledge to make a flight team should ever have to sit through 8th grade A&P again. Other specialty teams like Peds, Neo and Organ Procurement teach advanced skills (including performing Bronchoscopies) to RNs and don't require the RNs to get another license unless it is a cert pertaining to nursing. It just makes it easier to answer to one professional board and not worrying if you do something with a Paramedic license that could be out of scope because you always did it as an RN. This is especially true with meds.

    Someday EMS will drop its egos and see other professions as team members in health care rather then these ******* contests. Those in EMS who say they can do much more than a BSN RN and it only takes them 3 months to master everything need to go away with the lights and siren whackers.

    Back to the topic, it seems there are some colleges which take the RNs education and experience into account and will allow you to take just what you need. This should not be a big deal since Texas only requires 600 hours including classroom and field clinicals to be a Paramedic.
    Dmossb likes this.
  12. 0
    Agree traumasurfer - you must always look to the source of info. PHRN is a viable alternative for RNs interested in pre-hospital care. It builds on our basic RN assessment skills and adds the needed pre-hospital skills. Assessment skills always trump procedures IMHO.....in other words a solid nursing assessment is worth its weight in gold and can often forestall the need for a procedure.
  13. 1
    Quote from TraumaSurfer

    I hope nobody takes any information on that forum seriously. Most of those commenting on education have only a 3 - 6 month certificate as a Paramedic and no college. Not even an Associates. They regularly bash anyone with education and are very outspoken against RNs, NPs and PAs. Strange how someone with a 6 month cert from a medic mill can criticize a nurse with a Masters or Doctorate. Unless you have actually taken college level A&P and Pharmacology courses, you will probably not know how little you do know. It is also no surprise that most instructors for EMTs and Paramedics do not hold an Associates degree. There will always be a bias against those with education.

    For a nurse to transition to a certificate level course it should not be that difficult. A few new skills and additional algorithms are not that big of a deal if you have a strong foundation. Experience, past, present and future should be considered. This should be no different than an RN training another area of the hospital be it HBO, CCU, ECMO, ER, PICU, NICU, Onocology etc. We could also include those who intubate in the delivery room or do US. There is a transition period with educaiton and training but there is also respect for the education and experience as an RN. You also don't have to change your profession and can still be an RN.

    In a perfect world, no RN should ever have to change their profession or totally give up their identity as an RN to work as a "Paramedic". Cardiovascular RNs don't give up their identity to work in a position where there are also CV Technologists.

    Each state should have a prehospital credential and path for RNs who have the education and experience. No RN who has the experience and knowledge to make a flight team should ever have to sit through 8th grade A&P again. Other specialty teams like Peds, Neo and Organ Procurement teach advanced skills (including performing Bronchoscopies) to RNs and don't require the RNs to get another license unless it is a cert pertaining to nursing. It just makes it easier to answer to one professional board and not worrying if you do something with a Paramedic license that could be out of scope because you always did it as an RN. This is especially true with meds.

    Someday EMS will drop its egos and see other professions as team members in health care rather then these ******* contests. Those in EMS who say they can do much more than a BSN RN and it only takes them 3 months to master everything need to go away with the lights and siren whackers.

    Back to the topic, it seems there are some colleges which take the RNs education and experience into account and will allow you to take just what you need. This should not be a big deal since Texas only requires 600 hours including classroom and field clinicals to be a Paramedic.
    Dear colleague,
    With no disrespect intended, it is obvious that you are unaware of the curriculum of a paramedic course, certificate or associates. i am both a NREMT-P and BSN RN CEN. I can tell you that most medic programs are longer than 6 months, and the ones that are 6 months consist of 5 day per week 8 to 10 days of class room didactic and then 600-1000 hrs of clinical time. The "few extra skills" you write about include intubation, chest decompression, EKG recognition, and in some states central line placement in the field along with other immobilization, extrication, and transportation techniques.
    As someone who completed BOTH programs I can assure you that paramedic school was much more challenging and when completed you are tasked with managing pt care w/o the benefit of yelling out side of the room " I need help in here!" Cause there is no one else to call. With all of this said they are different scopes of practice with different missions and goals for pt care, but both have the best interest of the pt in mind. There are many pre hospital providers with big egos and attitudes that don't understand other practices so in the end don't fall into the same trap and take the position that they are less educated or that you could just " jump" right into a pre hospital provider role. I ASSURE YOU, there is ALOT more to the job than you are recognizing.
    vamedic4 likes this.


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