New grad struggling with receiving/giving report New grad struggling with receiving/giving report - pg.2 | allnurses

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New grad struggling with receiving/giving report - page 2

I am a old 'new grad' graduated last year May. Recently started on a stepdown med/resp floor. lots of unstable/critical patient. I get 3 weeks of orientation, and I am really struggling right now.... Read More

  1. Visit  studog12 profile page
    #13 0
    i'm in a similar situation as you, my friend. I am a new grad nurse working in a cardiac intensive care unit, and the learning curve is overwhelming, yet exciting. And you know what I probably have the most anxiety about? Giving report. I am a very detail oriented guy, and I have made my own SBAR sheet, structured the way I want it so I will be able to reference and use it in the manner which suits my brain. This means that I organize it in such a way wherr the little details of patients that are nice to know are included, too, simply because I want the next nurse to be as prepared and have as smooth of a start to his/her shift as possible. So I go through my routine...patient's name is so and so, he or she came in with this, has as history of that, etc., only to have my preceptor jump in, say I am a new grad, and start giving report. I wasn't mad at her or anything, but it perplexed me why she thought I was going about it the wrong way...doesn't one begin with the patient's name and then move to the more pertinent information such as diagnosis, history, and treatment? I guess I am just more of a step-wise person, and I don't do well with jumping from this bit of information to that bit about the patient when giving report, as I simply can't remember without looking at my cheat sheet and following my routine. My preceptor is kind of like that, and I plan on talking to her about my difficulty with report, explaining my vision for going about it, and asking for her advice on my thinking and what I could change to make it better. Anyway, I want you to know that you are not alone, my friend, and that even though giving and taking report may seem easy to some nurses, it is not as easy for those who are more inclined to detail in their communication and the more linear thinkers. Trial and error will help get us where we need to be; that and time. Let's hang in there and keep learning!