CoWorker Problem

  1. Hi, I'm a new GPN with what I hope will be a great first job. I've been orienting at a great facility for the last month. While I was being oriented by the first nurse, everything was great. She let me do what I could and even let me make my own mistakes and then told me when I did and what to do to fix it. I also learned that the nurse, an lpn, on the other wing that I would be with was not too happy to have me. There were a few nasty comments made by this nurse about me and from what I hear not too many of the other nurses like her either. In fact, our scheduler did not want me to even orient with this woman, but shortages being what they are....The first night we had problems. I was talking to one of the RN's who had worked that wing and asked her to give me a crush list. The lpn heard and flew into a rage. She even threatened to leave. Instead she pulled the RN into the med room and chewed her out. She then told me either I was orienting with her or with the RN. I didn't realize I was in such a breech of etiquette by asking for the crush list from the RN. Later while we were doing our charts she gloated about putting the RN in her place.

    Well, yesterday was suppose to be my second day of orientation with her, she said she wanted me to slow down that I had made some mistakes because I was going too fast. This burned me up. First I should add she delays getting to work and then whines because she can't get done quick enough. I say this not because I don't think its possible I made a mistake, I could have. I say it because I think some of the reason she wants me to slow down is because she does not want to work harder to get done with the first med pass till after dinner has started. You see all the nurses where I work have to help feed. I hope this is coming out right I don't mean to imply that I could never make a mistake, I'm sure I might have. Now this gets complicated so I'll try to put it down so you can follow. I worked with her the first time on Thursday. She was off friday. The mar's were changed saturday. When did she find the mistakes I had made? If she saw me make the mistakes why did she wait to tell me, if not...how did she find them? Then yesterday, she was arguing with an aide in a resident's room in front of the resident's, what is the deal with that? I want to learn from her she has been a nurse for a long time but I don't trust her after all of this and I don't know how to handle this situation without causing problems. I really want to like my new position. Anyone got any good ideas on how I can get through this and still learn something?
    •  
  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   mom2michael
    Is there anyway you can talk to the DON about going back with the 1st nurse? It sounds like you learned a lot from her and you were progressing in your training. It appears the nurse you are with now is not helping you progress in your training. A good manager will know, short staffed or not, if you don't progress in your training, you won't finish your training, therefore you won't be able to help with the shortage issue.

    Good luck!!
  4. by   nursemaa
    [QUOTE=mom2michael] A good manager will know, short staffed or not, if you don't progress in your training, you won't finish your training, therefore you won't be able to help with the shortage issue. QUOTE]

    I totally agree!! If the new grads aren't mentored and supported as they grow their practice, they won't succeed...therefore we all suffer as the shortage continues to grow. We need to welcome new folks and help them so that hospitals are not perceived as toxic places to work. The environment has enough troubles of its own, we don't need to intensify them!
  5. by   Monica RN,BSN
    [QUOTE=nursemaa]
    Quote from mom2michael
    A good manager will know, short staffed or not, if you don't progress in your training, you won't finish your training, therefore you won't be able to help with the shortage issue. QUOTE]

    I totally agree!! If the new grads aren't mentored and supported as they grow their practice, they won't succeed...therefore we all suffer as the shortage continues to grow. We need to welcome new folks and help them so that hospitals are not perceived as toxic places to work. The environment has enough troubles of its own, we don't need to intensify them!

    You are exactly right. Actually a good orientation is the key to keeping staff. Not training properly, throwing them in too fast, inadaquate preceptors that run off the newbies cause a lot more harm than anything. It is a lot more cost effective and only common sense to train them right and keep them, then to have to recruit again and retrain all over..

close