Scrubs in ER

  1. Has any department found literature or policies regarding the wearing of hospital provided scrubs in the ER? We were recently mandated to provide our OWN scrubs and wash them at home unless we can find documentation proving this unsafe.

    Thanks


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    wamherrns
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   gvar
    We wear and wash our own scrubs at our E.D.
    However, the hospital pays for 3 full sets of scrubs for each employee. Also, remember, you can write off washing your uniforms on your taxes. Makes for a nice little employee expense at the end of the year.
    gvar
  4. by   ncangel
    I wasn't aware you could take washing your uniforms off on your taxes! I did know about claiming your new uniforms but how do you claim washing them? Do you claim it on State or Fed? Thanks for the help, got to start thinking about taxes now that it is the New Year!
  5. by   Jacci59
    When I jworked ED, they wouldn't even allow us to wear scrubs. they do now though, but must wash their own.
    I have taken off laundering of uniforms on my taxes for the past 20 yrs. You must be itemizing to do so though. I figure .50 for each usniform that I wash, or each day that I work. that may actually be a low figure, but it works for me. If you didn't know, you can also take off the stockings, or socks that you buy to wear with uniforms, as well as the cost of any shoes or other equipment that you buy to use for work. I was taught this 20 some yrs ago by a woman who did our taxes. It is amazing, when you sit down and note all the things that you spend money on for work purposes. Don't short change yourself.......the Government already gets enough of our money. Also, take off any money you spend for education, and the mileage to get there. any mandatory meetings that you must attend for which you must travel. Of course, the education must be related to your employment. we are all required to have so many CEU's per year. Getting them, is taz deductable.
    If you have any other questions about what you can and cannot deduct, I just might be able to answer them for you.!! At least I will be glad to try.
    Jacci59
  6. by   Chris Reardon
    In our hospital, only OB, OR, and CS get to wear hospital-supplied scrubs. The rest of us have to provide our own without any hospital subsidy (but, thanks to some of you who have posted replies, tax deductions will figure in my next encounter with the IRS!). On the postive side, hospital scrubs here are pretty ratty anyway, and the short inseams give guys like me (6'4") the classic "floodpants" look (not cool). So I guess it's OK after all! Here's another angle though--I used to be married to a woman who, as it turned out, suffered from obsessive compulsive disorder coupled with germ phobia, and no matter how careful I was in transferring uniforms from my body to the washing machine, she was always fearful that she might get something from them (or me!) Wouldn't have minded having hospital scrubs in those days!!!
  7. by   LisaPRN
    Actually this was a topic of discussion at work today. We all provide and wash our own uniforms in our ED, but I was told by one of the physicians today that it is an OSHA violation. technically we are a walking biohazard when we leave and if we wear scrubs in to work from home we are introducing bacteria into the environment. I was going to check into this further.
  8. by   sailbob99
    i have worked in ER settings small/big hospitals, never heard of any issues about biohazard regarding scrubs.Large hospitals in this area provide scrubs....6'4" no problem, small hospitals do not.
  9. by   CEN35
    Ditto here,

    OR/PACU/ANESTHESIA/AMBULATORY SURGERY they get scrubs furnished by the hospital. ER/UNITS/FLOORS- by your own stuff, wash your own stuff, even after getting slimed by a puker, bleeder, cougher, or urinater.



    Rick
  10. by   jamistlc
    Originally posted by LisaPRN:
    <STRONG>Actually this was a topic of discussion at work today. We all provide and wash our own uniforms in our ED, but I was told by one of the physicians today that it is an OSHA violation. technically we are a walking biohazard when we leave and if we wear scrubs in to work from home we are introducing bacteria into the environment. I was going to check into this further.</STRONG>
    This is what I thought ! That it was an OSHA violation since in all peobability an ER Nurse will have contaminated blood or the scrub. It is the hospital who should care for the scrubs on site to confirm to OSHA standards. If you think about it it is only logical that these scrubs should be bagged and tied until washed, hehehe!

    Peace,
    jami
  11. by   jamistlc
    Originally posted by LisaPRN:
    <STRONG>Actually this was a topic of discussion at work today. We all provide and wash our own uniforms in our ED, but I was told by one of the physicians today that it is an OSHA violation. technically we are a walking biohazard when we leave and if we wear scrubs in to work from home we are introducing bacteria into the environment. I was going to check into this further.</STRONG>
    This is what I thought ! That it was an OSHA violation since in all peobability an ER Nurse will have contaminated blood or the scrub. It is the hospital who should care for the scrubs on site to confirm to OSHA standards. If you think about it it is only logical that these scrubs should be bagged and tied until washed, hehehe!

    Especially in todays world where your clients are the sickest of the sick, and you see all most all the new cases admitted to the hospital on the frontline so to say. Only God knows exactly what you are actually dealing with!
  12. by   CEN35
    Jami, I have to wonder about that also? Our hospital infectious control claims, we need to wear lab coats when we leave the ER, because we are a infectious risk. yet it is ok to wear our scrubs home, in our car, throw them in our laundry basket, and wash them in our washer, where the remains are pumped into our septic field? Hmmmm. wonders if they mae anti-bacterial laundry detergent.......ahhhhhh...second thoughts NOT! I imagine that anti-bacterial laundry detergent would just kill off all the good active bacteria in the septic field. No answer here?

    Rick
  13. by   gvar
    Bio-hazard, maybe, but what about the floor nurses that wear uniforms and take them home every day. I don't see how OSHA could limit scrubs to in house cleaning and turn around and let a nurse from post-op, chemo unit etc. go home. Of course, no one has ever accused OSHA of applying common sense. LOL
  14. by   cmggriff
    I think it was in 1987 or '88 that the CDC mandated that hospitals wash the contaminated
    uniforms of hospital workers. So if a nurse or other patient care worker got clothing contaminated with body fluids, the clothing was not to leave the hospital until it had been laundered. Many hospitals began to furnish scrubs to those working in high risk areas because of the CDC recommendations to do so, and because of the expected expense of laundering various uniforms. I even started to keep a pair of work shoes at the hospital. Never took them home.
    As far as I know, the CDC and OSHA still re-
    quire contaminated clothing to be laundered by the hospital. Gary

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