PAINLESS INJECTIONS

  1. I HAVE BEEN AN RN FOR 27YRS.,MOST OF IT HAS BEEN IN ER. I WAS SHOWN A TECHNIQUE ABOUT 2O YRSE AGO,THAT REALLY WORKS CONSISTENTLY. PATIENTS ARE AMAZED THAT THE NEEDLE DOES NOT HURT. I MAKE A WIDE V WITH MY THUMB AND THE REST OF MY HAND. I COUNT TO 3 AND SIMULTANEOUSLY INJECT THE NEEDLE AT THE SAME TIME I SLAP THE MUSCLE. I GIVE THE INJECTION BETWEEN THE WIDE SPACE OF MY OTHER HAND. IT IS IMPORTANT TO SLAP THE MUSCLE THE SAME TIME THE NEEDLE IS INSERTED. ALSO DO THE SAME THING ON REMOVAL. COUNT TO 3 TO HELP YOU DO IT SPONTANEOUSLY. HAS ANYONE EVER USED THIS OR HEARD IT? LET ME KNOW. THANKS
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. by   vablueyes
    I have never used this method, but use a method that works great for me...even tetanus injections don't hurt....I get the area prepared and just before I hit the area with the needle, I tell the pt. to take a deep breath...the are so concentrated on breathing that they don't feel the needle going in. I have used this method successfully on children as well as needlephobic adults. Try it....I have children requsting me for thier injections.
  4. by   ed
    I an an ED nurse of 8 years...My technique goes like this: after picking my spot and preparing the area, I say, "Okay...on the count of three"...(I position the syringe over the site)..."One"...(then I insert the needle before they tense up)..."two"... (as I withdraw the plumger)..."three" (as I inject the contents). I am convinced that I experience less movement and pulling away this way. After all, most of the pain associated with shots comes from the volume and nature of the contents.
  5. by   Fayanne
    I have used your method with very good effect. Another one that I use often is to massage the area quite vigourosly with the thumb and forefinger of the hand that is making the V as I insert the needle, inject the medication and while I withdraw the needle.
  6. by   Meegan
    I work in dialysis where its common practice to inject a small amount of xylocaine just under the skin at the place where 15g. needles will subsequently be placed for treatment. The trade-off for not feeling the larger gauge needles is to have to experience the "sting" of the xylocaine. I find that using the index finger of my non-dominant hand to scratch an area (as though for an itch) of skin proximal to the injection site works like a charm as a pain reliever. And I don't know why...diversion, maybe? A spray of ethyl chloride can be helpful sometimes, too, though expensive.
  7. by   MaeCarmz
    hi. im a nursing student here in Philippines. our group research is about painless injection on infants receiving DPT and HepBVaccines. we use cold compress prior to injection to reduce the pain felt by the infants with the Gate control theory as its basis. we're still on data analysis this time, so i cant give the result of the study yet.
  8. by   jayne109
    I have found using a 27 guage needle when possible really helps. I haven't had anyone complain when doing this though it is slower to inject.:spin:
  9. by   analee23
    I know this is a bit off topic, but thought I'd share. I am currently self-administering Lovenox SQ for prophylactic treatment for DVTs (I had foot surgery and have a clotting disorder). Well, when I first went to give myself the shot it burned like CRAZY. I asked my mom about this (she has rheumatoid arthritis and gives herself shots all the time... enbrel I believe) she said that you should warm the syringe in your hand for about 10 minutes prior to administration and inject VERY slowly to avoid the burning sensation. This works like a charm for SQ injections... including lidocain/xylocaine. My mom always says that the dentist does the "painless shots" before procedures and that she got the technique from him. Gotta say, I'll remember that in the future when administering SQ shots!!

    For IM, I jiggle the muscle a little with my hand right before giving the shot... seems to help with pain as it forces the person to relax the muscle. I'll need to try the slap technique, haven't heard that one before!
  10. by   June55Baby
    OK, call me dense, but how do you - "Make a wide V with thumb and rest of hand. Count to 3 and simultaneously inject the needle at the same time slap the muscle." It sound's like that would take 3 hands! ! ! ! One hand to make the V; one hand to slap the muscle; and one hand to inject??!!??

    Can anybody help me out and explain this?
  11. by   txspadequeenRN
    technique is important for inserting the needle. i just use my thumb and forefinger and slightly pinch up the skin that creates a distraction..however, you can make a v, pinch the skin , slap the muscle, slap your grandma and the fact still remains its not the shot that hurts it's the medication...
  12. by   jojotoo
    Quote from ed
    I an an ED nurse of 8 years...My technique goes like this: after picking my spot and preparing the area, I say, "Okay...on the count of three"...(I position the syringe over the site)..."One"...(then I insert the needle before they tense up)..."two"... (as I withdraw the plumger)..."three" (as I inject the contents). I am convinced that I experience less movement and pulling away this way. After all, most of the pain associated with shots comes from the volume and nature of the contents.


    This may be effective as far as pain control goes, but I'd be pretty annoyed at being tricked.
  13. by   RunnerRN
    Quote from jojotoo
    This may be effective as far as pain control goes, but I'd be pretty annoyed at being tricked.
    I was thinking the same thing! I would also think you'd have more of a chance of someone moving because they aren't expecting the stick for another moment.
    I still think the best way for pain control for IMs is to insert the needle quickly, then inject the med "slowly." Massage after removing the needle seems to help as well.
  14. by   Spidey's mom
    I saw a doc slap a person's arm hard three times prior to the injection. I was in line for an injection. I got out of line.

    Slapping a person is assault, in my mind. Plus, either the slap hurts or the injection hurts.

    Most of the time my injections don't hurt the patient - it depends on needle size and how tense the person is.

    I think being tricked is wrong too.

    Wow, this thread is OLD.

    steph

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