non-rebreather vs oxymask

  1. 0
    Just a quick question, are non-rebreathers and oxymasks basically the same? When would it be more beneficial to use one over the other? Your answers are appreciated.

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 0
    From what I learned in emt school, they are different. A nonrebreather mask has a third, one way valve on the top of the mask to constrict the patient from rebreathing their own air. This is important because a hypoxic patient needs high concentrated oxygen that is free of co2
  4. 0
    Quote from Juwon
    From what I learned in emt school, they are different. A nonrebreather mask has a third, one way valve on the top of the mask to constrict the patient from rebreathing their own air. This is important because a hypoxic patient needs high concentrated oxygen that is free of co2
    Oxymask has large holes in mask, basically free flowing oxygen to pt mouth and nose and allowing pt to exhale CO2.
  5. 5
    NRB mask is designed to delivers 100% FiO2 whereas a SM delivers 60% FiO2.
  6. 4
    The regular mask has holes in it, and as you breathe in and out, you're getting a mixture of the expired air, room air, and the O2 that's flowing into the mask.

    The non-rebreather has valves. Basically holes with a plastic cover over them. When you breathe out, the expiration pushes the covers open, so the air from your lungs goes out into the room. Then on inhalation, the covers close, so all you're breathing in is the "100% O2." The valves make it so you're not "re-breathing" in the same air you just exhaled.
    LakeEmerald, bellissima, hoopschick, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from CRNA1982
    NRB mask is designed to delivers 100% FiO2 whereas a SM delivers 60% FiO2.
    100% NRB (according to respiratory) only gives 80-85%.
  8. 1
    Quote from SkylerW
    100% NRB (according to respiratory) only gives 80-85%.
    Theoretically, it delivers 100% FiO2 but due to lack of airtight fit of NRB mask on face; 80-85% is an accurate statement. The only way to deliver 100% FiO2 accurately is via airtight ventilation via Ambu or anesthesia mask and circuit.
    Altra likes this.
  9. 1
    A Nonrebreather mask must run on 12-15 lpm giving the patient approximately 90-100% oxygen, depending on fit and patient's flow demands. It is supposed to fit tight to the face, and has two one way valves, one on the side of the mask, and one over the inlet from the reservoir bag.

    An Oxymask uses a "diffuser" to aim the oxygen flowing into the device at the nose and mouth. It can be run at flows from 1-40 lpm (That would be a very tall flowmeter if we are speaking of the Thorpe tube variety most people are used to, but that's what the packaging states) It can deliver a wide range of FiO2, in some patients(again depending on their flow demands), that can mean upwards of 90%. It also has the advantage of not having a minimum flow rate, there isn't the change of being on "too low" a flow as in Venturi, Nonrebreathers, and simple masks. Simply adjust the oxygen flow rate until the patient has the desired saturation. There are no dials to turn, as in the Venturi. It's a simplistic mask that does a big job. Hospitals are switching to this mask for the ease of use and range of flow, eliminating the need for 3-4 DIFFERENT oxygen masks.
    TraumaSurfer likes this.


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