No pain meds in ER??

  1. So, how does everyone feel about the New Jersey hospital that decided to pull pain meds out of their ED?
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  2. 99 Comments

  3. by   blondy2061h
    The article I read confused the heck out of me. In parts it said no opiates, in others it said they had a plan to manage opiate use. It ended with a quote saying that opiates will always have a place, but will no longer be first line in their ER. Opiates were never meant as first line pain treatment. I can't have any NSAID products without having severe asthma flares, so if I come in with a broken leg, I better get me some opiates- as should anyone. It doesn't sound like they're planning on totally eliminating opiate use in the ER.
  4. by   ShaneTeam
    That sounds more reasonable. Fox news had reported they were pulling opiates to help curb dependancy.
  5. by   ShaneTeam
    So, Fox News had brought on this Dr. to discuss some trends in medicine, and this was brought out as kind of by the way thing. And the guest Dr. was for them pulling opiates. He said something about how we use 80% of the opiates manufactured in the world, but by no way could we be in that much pain. Then, they had stated it was to reduce dependency and addiction of opiates. I know ED's have been trying to reduce the amount of drug seekers in the ED, but if you pull the drugs, what do you do with the patients, like the PP who actually needs them?
  6. by   Karou
    Interesting. Our ER stopped stocking dilaudid as a way to be less appealing to drug seekers. Not sure how effective that has been. They will still do morphine and other drugs but dilaudid has to be sent from pharmacy (which it never is on time).
  7. by   ShaneTeam
    Quote from Karou
    Interesting. Our ER stopped stocking dilaudid as a way to be less appealing to drug seekers. Not sure how effective that has been. They will still do morphine and other drugs but dilaudid has to be sent from pharmacy (which it never is on time).
    So, has there been many angry patients over that, do you know? I mean we DO live in the era that patient satisfaction is everything.
  8. by   Karou
    Quote from ShaneTeam
    So, has there been many angry patients over that, do you know? I mean we DO live in the era that patient satisfaction is everything.
    Oh yes! They come to the unit and we hear about it non stop, even once they've gotten their dilaudid here. I'm not sure if the change will last or if it's made any difference down in the ER.

    For the rare patient there truly allergic to morphine and needs the dilaudid, I feel sorry for them.
  9. by   chare
    Quote from ShaneTeam
    So, how does everyone feel about the New Jersey hospital that decided to pull pain meds out of their ED?
    Would you post the link?
  10. by   ShaneTeam
    Quote from chare
    Would you post the link?
    Actually, I had seen it on TV.
  11. by   ShaneTeam
    Wow, according to this, it mainly is prescriptions. That wasn't what they had stated on FNC.

    Here is a link

    New Jersey hospital emergency room becomes first in U.S. to end use of opioid painkillers | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV
  12. by   Anonymous865
  13. by   imintrouble
    The tide is turning on pain control. From giving everybody who asks for an opiate, an opiate, to withholding serious pain meds to those who really need it.
    Just as the prior system aided the seeker, the new one hurts the patient who actually has intractable pain.
    There is no middle ground.
  14. by   MunoRN
    Despite many of the headlines, it doesn't appear that this hospital has stopped or plans on stopping opiate prescribing, they just try to avoid it, which isn't all that unusual. From one article:
    If you show up at the emergency room of St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, you'll have only a one-in-four chance of leaving there with a prescription for opioid pain pills.
    I assume they're referring just to patients who present primarily for pain, since that's actually a higher rate of opiate prescribing at discharge than the national average, which is just 17%.

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