mandatory scrubs? - page 3

Does your facility require you to wear a certain color scrubs for your unit, and if so, do they provide them, or give a clothing allowance? Our ER is talking about requiring nurses to wear one... Read More

  1. by   orange-rn
    Wearing White! Yuck! We Wear Royal Blue Or Black Or A Combo Of The 2. Love The All Black!
  2. by   needsmore$
    We are not allowed to wear black pants per the Infection Control nurse. She is concerned that we could get blood/body fluids on our clothing and "not see it".


    I guess it looks cooler to have blood splattered on my white top

    I'd love to wear black...

    Anne
  3. by   grammyr
    RNs wear royal blue pants and tops with either blue or print jacket. LPNs wear navy blue with same choice of jackets. CNAs wear ceil blue. Housekeeping wears something different as does business office, surgery, etc. Management thinks this will enable patients and visitors to be able to tell the difference. This has been tried in the past and did not work. Not sure why they think it will work now.
  4. by   Lucy4
    The hospital where I work recently made a change in the dress code for nursing staff. RNs and LPNs now wear white or navy or any combination. The nursing assistants wear dark green (as does housekeeping). The secretaries are still wearing navy and that will change as soon as a concensus is reached as to which color. No one was very happy about this initially but now everyone has adjusted and haven't heard any complaints recently.

    One point of dissatisfaction was, however, not recieving an allowance or being provided with some uniforms. The nursing assistants were provided with 2-3 sets and the secretaries will be provided with the same. The main hospital that my hospital is affiliated with recently changed to all white for the nurses. The nurses at main campus were provided with six pieces of their choice (tops, pants, jackets) as compared to none being provided for the nurses at my hospital.

    I have to admit that everyone looks neater and cleaner. The rather loose dresscode that was in place was not followed or enforced and some staff came to work looking pretty tacky and unprofessional.

    The change was in response to patients stating that they didn't know who their nurse was or couldn't recognize who was in and out of their room. I as well as the staff on my unit introduce myself as their nurse at the beginning of the shift and everyone wears nametags. Guess not many of the general population hears well or can read.
  5. by   PedsERRN
    We are going for magnet status soon, and I heard that easy recognition of nursing staff is required. I think this means we would have to switch to color-coded scrubs. Anybody know if this is true?
  6. by   SteveNNP
    We wear black scrubs in the ED. Looks good, but kind of scary to have someone leaning over you on a gurney dressed in black :>P

    On an aside, why can't housekeeping, pharmacy and all other non-patient care staff wear something else beside scrubs. It seems they want to be associated with something they're not. Leave the scrubs to those who actually provide care, eg nurses, techs and RT's. That's the point of them anyway, to be functional to fit our job. I think the confusion would lessen if the cleaning lady wasn't wearing scrubs just like the nurse, and everyone wore their nametag clearly.
  7. by   ERNurse752
    Quote from SteveRN21
    We wear black scrubs in the ED. Looks good, but kind of scary to have someone leaning over you on a gurney dressed in black :>P

    On an aside, why can't housekeeping, pharmacy and all other non-patient care staff wear something else beside scrubs. It seems they want to be associated with something they're not. Leave the scrubs to those who actually provide care, eg nurses, techs and RT's. That's the point of them anyway, to be functional to fit our job. I think the confusion would lessen if the cleaning lady wasn't wearing scrubs just like the nurse, and everyone wore their nametag clearly.

    I suggested this a few years ago, and I got totally blasted by those folks, and labeled the evil you know what who thinks nurses are better than everyone else.
  8. by   Plagueis
    Quote from SteveRN21

    On an aside, why can't housekeeping, pharmacy and all other non-patient care staff wear something else beside scrubs. It seems they want to be associated with something they're not. Leave the scrubs to those who actually provide care, eg nurses, techs and RT's. That's the point of them anyway, to be functional to fit our job. I think the confusion would lessen if the cleaning lady wasn't wearing scrubs just like the nurse, and everyone wore their nametag clearly.
    This is a great point. I just started working as a CNA, and everyone, from nurses, aides, and housekeeping, wears scrubs. And there are no nametags, either. I get so confused about who's a nurse, and who isn't. If I'm confused, imagine what the patients feel like?

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