Gray on ice? - page 2

by cardiac.cure03

5,538 Unique Views | 14 Comments

I had a clinical in the ER last week and kept hearing "gray on ice"... What is that??:icon_roll... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from adidasgirl0699
    Oh... Ok.
    So... Why do you put some on ice and some not?
    How do you know whether you put it on ice or not?
    If you're ever in doubt about whether or not to ice something, call the lab.

    Some specimens are iced to keep it from breaking down before you can get a result.
  2. 0
    Quote from Pedi-ER-RN
    At my facility Gray on ice=lactic acid, green on ice=ammonia level. If we draw a gas (arterial or venous) and resp is not right there to get it, we put the gas syringe on ice. If you have questions re labs at your facility, contact the lab and they should be able to tell you which tests go in what tube and what needs to be iced. Also, rely on some of the veteran nurses, they won't steer you wrong. It doesn't take a long time drawing labs to get the hang of what goes in what. .

    This is the same as at my Facility

    Mary Ann
  3. 0
    Putting specimens on ice slows down metabolism in the sample. Lactic acid and ammonia rise very quickly in a body temperature specimen and therefore give false high results. Glucose on the other hand will fall because the cells in the sample will keep absorbing it. There will always be unavoidable delays in processing labs, so this method gives the most accurate results.
  4. 0
    Hi,
    I am one of those wierdo RN's who used to be a medical technologist in the clinical laboratory. Some samples go on ice because ice slow's down the rate of that substance being "used up" or "metabolized out" by the cells. A lot of things in the lab also have to do with what type of instrumentation and methodology is being used to run the test. That is why in some hospitals you can use certain tubes for a test but not in others. Just my 2 cents.
    Have a great day,
    Cindy
  5. 0
    same in my ed as pedi er


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