ER violence - page 3

:wavey: Hi I'm interested in knowing what types of violent situations you may have been exposed to in the ER. Does a lot of it come from drunks? Thanks Matt... Read More

  1. by   Jenny Renn
    Quote from mommatrauma
    We now use Vitamin G...good stuff!! Geodon!
    Here in Australia I often recomend a good dose of TLC... yes that's Temazepan, Lorazepam, and Clonazepam.

    J.R.
  2. by   ERNurse752
    Quote from DinkysKitty
    I was considering working in the ER..But.. I don't feel like dealing with people how are violent, knowing me I would probably just beat the crap out of em. Which is probably bad, but you know some off these people deserve it!! ...ooo...taser....yay!! (I have this incrediably weird since of humour....)

    I think a taser should be part of the triage process. :hatparty:
  3. by   needsmore$
    i find that the patient's family could be the violent ones. They are frustrated by long wait times, stressed out by someone's illness and their desire to have their family member seen IMMEDIATELY------and often they have to wait. They wait to be triaged, they wait for a room, they wait for the doc, they wait....


    And the more they wait, the madder they get. Then , if they don't get what they feel is needed (narcs, admission, food, immediate results, xrays, whatever) they get more mad.

    The only times I have been scared have been when dealing with family members whose expectations of what the ED does are unrealistic. They want cures in the ED- and when the ED rules out the "life threat, no surgery immediately required, you need to follow up with your family doc" medical problem---more frustration for them. They want immediate answers with immediate results.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Anne
  4. by   teeituptom
    Now that I learned to control my temper there is a lot less violence in our ER now

  5. by   noki74
    he! the drunkers are like a flower compering with a victims family members, they are the worst and the worst violents they know everything more than doctors and nurses, is really bisare.They even are a picks who will stop a working proces sometime. But that is all the fall of Institute because Each Er should have they own security.
  6. by   elizabells
    Quote from student4ever
    Usually not, though just last week we had someone mix copious amounts of etoh with her xanax, and for some reason, her rxn tended to be quite violent.
    This isn't uncommon, for some paradoxical reason. My ex's father was like this. The last straw for me was watching my exbf physically fight his father for the car keys (Daddy wanted to go get more liquor...) and Momma leaning out the window screaming that she was going to call 911, and exbf running inside and ripping the phone out of the wall. It was like my very own episode of Cops!

    Oh, did I mention this all happened after an hour lecture from Daddy about how I needed a boob job? Yeah. :uhoh21: ETOH + Xanax = baaaaaad. One drink and a Xanax, well, kind of dumb, might depress your resps, but not an emergency. Fifteen Xanax and a twelve pack of Coor's light? No good.
  7. by   laurakoko
    I have to agree with the family member.......... I have been a nurse for 10 + years, and worked in the ER.....

    However, I was on the "other side" as I brought my sister to the ER with abd pain. It was horrible sitting there for 4+ hours watching her suffer.... I finally walked to the desk and said, I am a nurse, and I know about those pain in the a** family members, but I have to be one of them, she is hurting, and has been here for a while..." The nurse was understanding, and asked the doc for pain meds, and gave her something IVP.. she was better. She ended up with a diverticula that ruptured, had peritonitis, had surgery, ending up with a colostomy, being in the hospital for 9 days, and she was 37 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Horrible... but after that, I totally understand family members watching loved ones suffering.... and now am that more sympathetic...
    sometimes it does take it happening to you................................or them...
  8. by   MNnurseMom
    I saw the anger of a father once in the ER when I was at the Children's Hospital with my daughter. He was there with a gun waiting for his child to be seen. Unfortunately we were in the next exam room. A nurse came to our room, closed us in the room and my daughter and I sat in the far corner until they came in and said everything was OK. That was a frustrating situation for me.
  9. by   schoona
    Unfortunately violence is everywhere, no matter which ED you might attend. We have the local police station on speed dial as our security here (Australia) is limited in the extent they can enforce appropriate behaviour. Supposedly we have a zero tolerance policy and myself and other staff have refused to treat aggressive pts (needless to say they didn't have life threatening illnesses or injuries), however, medical staff in one instance thought we were overreacting, until they were spat at (pt hep c+), how quickly they changed there tune!!
    Last edit by schoona on Jun 19, '05 : Reason: grammar
  10. by   CEN35
    drunks, psych patients, those mad because they had to wait to be seen, and those that don't want their family in to see them:

    Nice ladie, under the covers (unkowingly to me in wrist restraints),

    "Sir can you come here for a minute I have a question"?

    "Yes mam"

    BOOOMM Kicked in the nads for no reason.

    A fenale nurse went to stick an IV in a total gentelman, and soon as she poked him he went nuts. I was ridng his back, and it took 9 people to restrain him, and he broke the soft restraints.

    PCP, cocaine people, any of that.

    AAA - being tubed, IVF's, CPR, 5 people in the room, one guy limps in and wants to know why there are so many people in the room with the AAA pt, while his ankle is hurting and starts yelling at everybody.

    24 yo Female as patient. Does not want the family in back to see her. The father says, "I'm her father I have a right, your lucky I don't come back later and blow your head off".

    It has been getting worse over the years, and the floors have started to see it the last year or so also. People look at us as a McDonalds drive thru, get in, fix it and get out, or they are mad. Also the pt's families think they have all the rights, and like to tell you how to do your job. When in reality the patients are the ones with the rights.

    Who knows??????????????
  11. by   casi
    Okay here's my question: Why can't they just put up metal detectors in the hospital entryways? Might be a little costly at first, but it would save you guys from a lot of preventable problems.

    I know it wont stop the physically violent from lashing out, but it would save hospital staff from dealing with having knives and guns being pulled on them.

    I have to take a moment to thank all the ER staff and all the stuff they put up with!

    casi
  12. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from night fox
    Hi

    I'm interested in knowing what types of violent situations you may have been exposed to in the ER. Does a lot of it come from drunks?

    Thanks
    Matt
    I would like to respond from the other side, when a patient feels threatened by a nurse. I am a very hard stick, for drawing blood and starting IVs. I warn the nursing staff of this and request someone who is known for successfully starting on hard sticks. Generally, my request is met in a positive manner. However, I had the experience of having a nurse refuse to stop sticking me, after I had requested she stop twice. The third time, in a very loud voice, I threatened to hit her, if she didn't stop immediately. Needless to say, she stopped and it bought a doctor and two other nurses to my room. This nurse was committing assualt and battery on me. However, I have been criticized, by my peers, for threating to strike this nurse. Criticism I feel is totally unwarrented. Yes, they are patients who can and do assault staff, as do their family members. On the other hard, there are staff who assault their patients by threating their well-being and their physical well being, in the guise of 'helping'. There are two sides to every picture.

    Grannynurse
  13. by   teeituptom
    Quote from casi
    Okay here's my question: Why can't they just put up metal detectors in the hospital entryways? Might be a little costly at first, but it would save you guys from a lot of preventable problems.

    I know it wont stop the physically violent from lashing out, but it would save hospital staff from dealing with having knives and guns being pulled on them.

    I have to take a moment to thank all the ER staff and all the stuff they put up with!

    casi
    Metal detectors sometimes work and are usuaully accepted in inner city Hospitals. But out here in Suburbia, it will never be accepted. The community doesnt like to see that the potential for violence is possible even in their sheltered little world. They just dont want to acknowledge it. This comes from a nurse who has worked 20 yrs in the middle of right wing moral majority suburbia of Plano Texas. The epitome of Suburbia.

    Ive also had 3 teeth knocked out work

    a couple of episodes of cracked ribs

    I silver dollar sized <one of the old silver dollars> chunk of flesh bitten out of my forearm and then swallowed by the patient.

    Numerous bruises, and scrapes.

    all from intoxicated or whacked out pts and their families.

    Ive had knives pulled on me, fortunately they missed

    But I wouldnt trade ER for nothing

    But then I also like Sky Diving, maybe its a character flaw on my part

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