ER CNAs - page 2

Hello I've completed all my prereqs for nursing school, including my CNA course. I'll most likely start NS in the fall of 2007. So, i've decided to apply for some aide jobs. The one that... Read More

  1. by   sunshineonleith
    hey thanks, i will. you brought up good points about getting to know where things are/the docs. i will be in this ED later on this year for at least a small rotation, hopefully by then i'll have my head screwed on straight, eh?
  2. by   tacole
    I have been a tech in an ER for 5 1/2 years, we work both with critical and non critical pts. The CNA's in our dept are called techs. At our hospital, CNA I is PCA, and CNA II is PCT. Our facility, allows us to do everything the nurse does except give medicine. We do probably 90% of the work, or pretty close. We work hard for the little money we get.
  3. by   tacole
    I agree with you. The ER is the most exciting place I have ever worked and you see everything. People outside of the medical field just would not believe the things we do and see. It is an exciting adventure everyday. I think everyone should have to work as a CNA in an ER for a while before they can try nursing school. It would make a better nurse out of them.
  4. by   TheERisForMe
    hi... i've been a tech for 2 years at a level 1 ED, it's my dream job and i can't wait until i graduate... but one thing i did that i think helped is that i had 6 months in the ED observation unit first. this gave me a chance to pick up a lot of basic skills before moving on to traumas and all that. I also felt pretty underqualified sometimes but as long as you ask a million questions and pay attention you'll pick it up pretty quick.
  5. by   Mr. Grumpy
    Sunshine, Your burning my parade up. If you have never worked in ED, you may need more orientation than 2 weeks (especially a Level I). Your previous experience in nursing school is not going to help you as much as you think. Mostly, your orientation will be the standard JCAHO, Haz-Mat, paperwork stuff that will become an old file cabinet for that 0.5% of crap that you don't use. The rest is the stuff that will "make or break" you working in the ED. These are the task oriented skills. Be prepared to grow some tough skin and work hard. It is not always peaches and cream. Finally, good luck.
  6. by   sunshineonleith
    you're **** straight its not all peaches

    so far, i love the ER and i want to cry about 2x a shift. I am expected to know where things are/how to do things that i've never seen/done before in my life. I constantly feel like a failure. I've had 3 12 hour shifts of orientation to the actual ED and 8 hrs as a HUC (secretary). I have two more eights coming up this week, and then i'm on my own! I think the scariest thing for me will be splints that I've never done before. Its scary, frustrating, exhausting. However - the RN's are AMAZING at showing me things I've never seen/done before, the Docs have all been nice so far, and I'm looking forward to going back this week. It will take me time to adjust, but I'm learning so much.
  7. by   Jen2
    I have been a tech in an ER for 5 1/2 years, we work both with critical and non critical pts. The CNA's in our dept are called techs. At our hospital, CNA I is PCA, and CNA II is PCT. Our facility, allows us to do everything the nurse does except give medicine. We do probably 90% of the work, or pretty close. We work hard for the little money we get.
    I am sure you work very hard. I don't mean to flame you and please do not take offense. Nursing is probably 5% skill and 95% critical thinking. I truly take offense when you say that you do everything the nurse does except give meds. There is so much more to nursing than putting in I.V.'s and pushing drugs.
  8. by   nursebearfeet
    most people are intimidated by the er. i am in a level one trauma center. our ed techs are all paramedics. so they can perform a lot of duties, and most of them rock. if you are in nursing school and have the opportunity to work in the ed, do it. it will teach you how to time manage, multi task, and assess in a hurry, and so much more. you wont regret it. don't be intimidated, find a good work buddy (if your lucky, it'll be your preceptor) and learn everything that comes your way. it will help you immeasurably in school, and which ever area you then choose to go into!
    good luck and welcome to the er team.
  9. by   netgeek
    Hi I live in Canada and we dont EMT's or CNA's in the ER. Its mostly just the nurse. I am interested in becoming an ER nurse in the states. I have my bachelor of science in nursing.

    I was wondering what does the ER nurse do when there are techs and CNA's? Is the nurse on the bottom of the pack when it comes to the "hierarchy" of the ER?

    Thanks.

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