Any one pursuing a DNP, this fall?

  1. Just wondering if anyone is applying to or already accepted into a DNP program. If so, could you share your thoughts on what was the deciding factor? Thank you for your time in advance.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   Jen-Marie4MSN-RNC-OB
    I have debated this for two years now. Almost diving into DNP on line programs, then checking out PhD programs and EdD programs. I have wanted a position in academia for years, but nursing education at the BSN level requires a terminal degree, so even with my MSN, I cannot get a tenure-track faculty position there. I suggest you consider three things as you make your decision: 1) What do you want out of it, or what is your ultimate goal? If you want to teach, do you want to teach full-time and at what level? If you want to teach, are you willing to give up your fat hourly wage at the hospital for the demands of teaching, which rarely pays as well? 2) Do you have the money for your program? and 3) Do you have the time to dedicate to the program so you can finish it on time? This is even more important if you plan to work while you are in the program or if you have a demanding family. Finally, I suggest considering your age and how you envision your future career. Are you over 50 and thinking of leaving "the floor" for a teacher's lifestyle? If that is the case, don't forget to factor in the many demands on faculty members -- they have to research, publish, do community service projects, participate on committees, and counsel students past and present, all within the same salary and time-constraints of their teaching and grading requirements. It's more work than meets the eye. Still, it's what I want to do, so I'm not knocking it. Best wishes on your tough decision! Jen-Marie
  4. by   driver461
    Interesting comment on the terminal degree aspect. I was looking at a terminal FNP program. So many angles to consider.
  5. by   knurse10
    The only reason I am considering DNP when I am done with my MSN is because I love teaching. Also, I may want to be more diverse as a nurse practitioner. For example, teaching full time or part time and seeing patients full time or part time. Plus there is the prestige of having a terminal degree. Not a lot of people can say they have it.

    Drawbacks for me are cost, time, time away from my family, wanting to start a family, and me wanting a break from school. In addition, I struggled with my research project regarding the implementation. I am not looking forward to another in depth process of a huge project that is required with DNP or PhD.
  6. by   Jules A
    Quote from knurse10
    Plus there is the prestige of having a terminal degree. Not a lot of people can say they have it.
    Unfortunately it is no longer especially prestigious or rare.

    "There were eight DNP programs in 2004. To date,
    52 DNP programs have been accredited by CCNE, and
    an additional 69 DNP programs are pursuing CCNE
    accreditation; 153 DNP programs are currently
    enrolling students at schools of nursing compared to
    124 research-focused doctorates; an additional 106
    DNP programs are in the planning stages (American
    Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2011)"

    From:
    https://www.nursingeconomics.net/nec..._Editorial.pdf
  7. by   Darth Practicus
    Quote from knurse10
    Drawbacks for me are cost, time, time away from my family, wanting to start a family, and me wanting a break from school. In addition, I struggled with my research project regarding the implementation. I am not looking forward to another in depth process of a huge project that is required with DNP or PhD.
    I'm presently in a DNP program and have done quite well without spending an inordinate amount of time in the class. My program has 8-week accelerated classes and usually just a couple of the weeks require an intensive amount of time to complete the project. I, admittedly, am one of the world's most prolific procrastinators when it comes to classwork and I always manage. So, anyone with a semblance of ability to balance work over a span of weeks would breeze through from a time-investment perspective.

    The cost and wanting a break from school are legit things, though, and something to consider before going back.

    Darth Practicus, NP
  8. by   Darth Practicus
    Quote from Jules A
    Unfortunately it is no longer especially prestigious or rare.

    "There were eight DNP programs in 2004. To date,
    52 DNP programs have been accredited by CCNE, and
    an additional 69 DNP programs are pursuing CCNE
    accreditation; 153 DNP programs are currently
    enrolling students at schools of nursing compared to
    124 research-focused doctorates; an additional 106
    DNP programs are in the planning stages (American
    Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2011)"

    From:
    https://www.nursingeconomics.net/nec..._Editorial.pdf
    I can't say this is a bad thing for our profession, right?


    Darth Practicus, NP
  9. by   Jules A
    Quote from Darth Practicus
    I can't say this is a bad thing for our profession, right?

    Darth Practicus, NP
    In my opinion it would be an excellent thing for our profession if these programs were selective, stringent, consistent and actually increased our clinical acumen which at present I do not believe to be the case especially if:

    Quote from Darth Practicus
    So, anyone with a semblance of ability to balance work over a span of weeks would breeze through from a time-investment perspective.
  10. by   bnschief
    [QUOTE=Darth Practicus;9443611]I'm presently in a DNP program and have done quite well without spending an inordinate amount of time in the class. My program has 8-week accelerated classes and usually just a couple of the weeks require an intensive amount of time to complete the project. I, admittedly, am one of the world's most prolific procrastinators when it comes to classwork and I always manage. So, anyone with a semblance of ability to balance work over a span of weeks would breeze through from a time-investment perspective.

    The cost and wanting a break from school are legit things, though, and something to consider before going back.



    Which program are you attending???
  11. by   knurse10
    Quote from Jules A
    Unfortunately it is no longer especially prestigious or rare.

    "There were eight DNP programs in 2004. To date,
    52 DNP programs have been accredited by CCNE, and
    an additional 69 DNP programs are pursuing CCNE
    accreditation; 153 DNP programs are currently
    enrolling students at schools of nursing compared to
    124 research-focused doctorates; an additional 106
    DNP programs are in the planning stages (American
    Association of Colleges of Nursing [AACN], 2011)"

    From:
    https://www.nursingeconomics.net/nec..._Editorial.pdf
    Yes, the amount of programs has certainly increased. However, the percentage of DNP prepared nurses is very small compared to MSN, BSN, and Associates prepared nurses. I remember seeing it broken down somewhere but am trying to find the official source. Will post when I find it....
  12. by   knurse10
    "In 2008, 13.2 percent of the nation's registered nurses held either a master's or doctoral degree as their highest educational preparation. The current demand for master's- and doctorally prepared nurses for advanced practice, clinical specialties, teaching, and research roles far outstrips the supply."

    AACN retrieved from American Association of Colleges of Nursing | Nursing Fact Sheet

    Wish there were some more current stats...
  13. by   Jules A
    Quote from knurse10
    Wish there were some more current stats...
    Oh but there is:

    https://bhw.hrsa.gov/sites/default/f...s2013-2025.pdf

    Too Many Nurse Practitioners?
  14. by   jaluo2014
    Very excited indeed, completed ADN-BSN last Spring 2017, and currently on BSN-DNP that I started this Fall 2017. Its all in class public university. I work fulltime and on a 4 year program. This was my end-goal. I can't wait!

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