Should the "Doctor" title really be an issue? - page 5

by SycamoreGuy 9,563 Views | 49 Comments

The number one arguement against DNPs using the title Doctor, especially in the clinical setting, is that it might confuse patients. Ignoring the fact the most DNPs clarify that they are not medical doctors, should this even be... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from lvn2bsoon
    The term "nurse" is also legally protected. People can face serious charges by saying they are a nurse when they aren't.

    Technically, we are ALL doctors, because the term "doctor" in Latin means "teacher." Sooo....there's another one for ya....should we call teachers "doctor"?
    Yep. Every single one who has a PhD should be designated as such. And good on them.

    (I do hear what you're saying, though, and I love the irony and sarcasm. As you can imagine. )
  2. 3
    Quote from nursing 101
    It's an earned title and anyone who has it should use...period! If physicians don't like it, they should introduce themselves as the following:" Hello, I am doctor so and so, with a medical degree"... no confusion there!
    "I am Doctor X, and I will be your physician." THAT'S correct and very simple to understand.
  3. 0
    Quote from Rizz
    I've seen orders written from MD's to pharmacists and the MD addressed the pharmacist In the order as "Dr". Anyone with a doctorate has earned that title. I do think until the public has been educated (may never happen) DNP's should probably introduce themselves as "I'm Dr so-and-so your nurse practitioner". Although I have plans to get my DNP and I'm pretty sure I'll just introduce myself by my first name. I found working in the hospital the patients could care less I was the RN and the other person helping them was a tech. They didn't care about titles at all, they just wanted help however they could get it.
    I bolded that statement above. It won't IF WE DON'T START DOING IT and stop assuming the public is too daft to know the difference. Because saying (and I'm not accusing you of this), 'oh, Joe Citizen will be too confused if we do that' assumes Joe is an idiot.

    To me, it also belittles both the degree and the practitioner. You could say, "Hi, I'm Dr. Rizz, your nurse practitioner today, but you can call me Sam."
  4. 0
    Quote from carolinapooh
    I've often wondered this; thanks for the clarification.
    In the USAF CRNAs have completely independent practice. We have the best scope of practice in the entire military!!...lol Not that I am bragging or anything.
  5. 0
    Quote from nomadcrna
    I introduce myself as Doctor xxx, a nurse anesthetist or Doctor xxxx, a nurse practitioner. I earned the title. I'm damn well going to use it.
    AND, no the patients are not confused.
    YAYYAYAYAYAYAYAYAYAYAY!!!!!!!!
  6. 0
    Quote from nomadcrna
    So, you are not a CRNA yet here you are telling us the difference in practice between CRNA and MDA? REALLY?
    There is NO distinction legally. We are judged LEGALLY, IN COURT to the EXACT same standards.
    .
    God forbid I try to tell you ANYTHING, oh great and mighty CRNA. I'm just a lowly generalist who can barely figure out how to wash my hands. Please excuse my arrogance...

    As far as legal distinctions go, yes their is a difference. It might be abstract but there is a difference. I believe their was a court case that said when CRNAs administer anesthesia it is the practice of nursing and not medicine. That might not be a big practical difference but it is a HUGE legal one.
  7. 0
    Quote from SycamoreGuy
    God forbid I try to tell you ANYTHING, oh great and mighty CRNA. I'm just a lowly generalist who can barely figure out how to wash my hands. Please excuse my arrogance...

    As far as legal distinctions go, yes their is a difference. It might be abstract but there is a difference. I believe their was a court case that said when CRNAs administer anesthesia it is the practice of nursing and not medicine. That might not be a big practical difference but it is a HUGE legal one.
    Actually, the case and several other ones that are similar to it have to do with various medical societies trying to sue nurses,especially APNs, stating that APNs were practicing medicine. The courts since the early 1900s have decided that as long you were trained in that area, and the BON allows it then it is a practice of nursing even though we are doing the same thing as our physician colleagues. There has also been similar cases concerning podiatrists.

    These cases are different than determining if standard of care was met. When providing anesthesia there is not a separate standard for CRNAs and one for anesthesiologists. It can get confusing when you read about anesthesia malpractice cases in ACT practices.

    FYI: every APN has to go through at least one semester medical legal training during school concerning APN/CRNA medical-legal issues. The class is often combined with medical ethics. I have had a little over two semesters now of CRNA medical-legal training, and it is still confusing for me.
  8. 0
    Doctor is an educational title. MDs are not the only one who hold that title, there are many others who hold that Doctor title. Your can be a Doctor of Nursing, but your occupation a registered nurse in whatever field. Remember Doctor is an educational title not an occupation.
  9. 0
    This is one of those polarizing topics that cause controversy. As always.......Allnurses promotes the idea of lively debate. This means you are free to disagree with anyone on any type of subject matter as long as your criticism is constructive and polite. We also require members to please refrain from name-calling. This is divisive, rude, and derails the thread.

    Our first priority is to the members that have come here because of the flame-free atmosphere we provide. There is a zero-tolerance policy here against personal attacks. We will not tolerate anyone insulting other's opinion nor name calling. Our call is to be supportive, not divisive.

    MODERATOR NOTE: Several posts have been edited/deleted. We can all agree to "disagree without being disagreeable" (Pres. G.Ford)......continued off topic posts will be edited/removed and points assigned.
  10. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna

    It is funny it only really becomes an issue when nurses call themselves Doctor. I don't hear an uproar from physicians when chiropractors, psychologists, and/or podiatrists call themselves doctors but the moment a nurse introduces themselves as Dr. X the nurse it is suddenly a crisis of patient confusion and safety. A doctorate is an academic degree, and there are numerous types of doctorates that a person can earn. Any person that earns a doctorate may have a reasonable expectation to be called by Dr. "X". Being a non-physician and being called a doctor does nothing, but harm a select few physician egos.
    You can have a doctorate in a field that has absolutely nothing to do with healthcare.
    This has been around for a long time.
    Many of these people with doctorates outside the
    medical field, would be extremely upset if you didn't refer them as doctor. Teachers are the worse with this in my experiences.


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