Share those precious last minutes, they deserve it... - page 2

"A ball had passed between my body and the right arm which supported him, cutting through the sleeve and passing through his chest from shoulder to shoulder. There was no more to be done for him and... Read More

  1. Visit  GinaDecorRN profile page
    0
    Beautiful. You speak with eloquence of the moments when many can't find the right words. Your patients and their families are truly blessed. Thank you for sharing.
  2. Visit  marty6001 profile page
    1
    I never think anyone would want to hear my stories. You all humble me. You really do. Thanks for all the kind words!!!
    ~miss_mercy_me likes this.
  3. Visit  Country.Girl profile page
    0
    Goosebumps as well! Spellbinding and beautifully written. I felt like I was there.
  4. Visit  fateema profile page
    0
    i'm sooooooooo inspired! keep up the good job and i hope this serves as a reminder to all nurses that our care continues till after the death of a patient
    Last edit by Joe V on Jan 11, '15
  5. Visit  Aryann0916 profile page
    0
    hi poh,

    im arlyn, a 4th year nursing student from ceu. i have a requirement and i need an icu nurse to answer my 3 questions.

    name:
    age:
    number of years as an icu/cc nurse:
    name of hospital you are currently employed:

    1. what are your roles as an icu nurse/critical care nurse?
    2. most significant experience you have encountered?
    3. knowledge, skills and attitude a critical care nurse must possess?

    will you please help me? thank you!
  6. Visit  jc317 profile page
    0
    Thank you for sharing this! I am hoping to go into pediatric oncology and I know that death with inevitably be part of the job and that in pediatrics, it may be particularly hard sometimes. Reading this summed up exactly what I hope to do for those families and patients. Thank you!
  7. Visit  Tenebrae profile page
    3
    Awesome article, thanks for sharing.

    I experienced this in the last week at work. I had a patient who has been dying slowly and painfully. Last Sunday it became apparently that the end was imminent. No one had actually sat the family down and said "are you aware that the end is imminent for your mum" she may go any day"

    How does one say that to a family? I opted for honestly. I asked the family members to take a walk with me. We sat for a talk. I explained what was happening with their loved one, and while it was clear that their loved one was amazingly strong, unfortunately there would come a time when the body would simply become unable to continue functioning. I stressed that its hard to tell exactly how long a persons end time may go on for however suspected that this may be sooner rather than later. I also acknowledged that this was a horribly confronting conversation to have, however had thought that they would want to know exactly what was going on with their family member.

    One of the other nurses was of the opinion we shouldnt tell them anything. And of course I then stressed out whether I had done the right thing. The patient passed 26 hours later. People talk about how a nurse touches the lives of their patients. I dont think many of them realise that patients impact on their nurses. I decided to attend the funeral of this person as it was on my day off. Getting hugged and thanked by every member of the family and told by one member "they would never forget me" convinced me that I'd had a positive effect and been able to help this family.

    You are so right, those last minutes are precious and its important to value them as we often dont get a second chance
    Lev <3, IEDave, and Joe V like this.
  8. Visit  IEDave profile page
    1
    Quote from Tenebrae
    Awesome article, thanks for sharing.

    I experienced this in the last week at work. I had a patient who has been dying slowly and painfully. Last Sunday it became apparently that the end was imminent. No one had actually sat the family down and said "are you aware that the end is imminent for your mum" she may go any day"

    How does one say that to a family? I opted for honestly. I asked the family members to take a walk with me. We sat for a talk. I explained what was happening with their loved one, and while it was clear that their loved one was amazingly strong, unfortunately there would come a time when the body would simply become unable to continue functioning. I stressed that its hard to tell exactly how long a persons end time may go on for however suspected that this may be sooner rather than later. I also acknowledged that this was a horribly confronting conversation to have, however had thought that they would want to know exactly what was going on with their family member.

    One of the other nurses was of the opinion we shouldnt tell them anything. And of course I then stressed out whether I had done the right thing. The patient passed 26 hours later. People talk about how a nurse touches the lives of their patients. I dont think many of them realise that patients impact on their nurses. I decided to attend the funeral of this person as it was on my day off. Getting hugged and thanked by every member of the family and told by one member "they would never forget me" convinced me that I'd had a positive effect and been able to help this family.

    You are so right, those last minutes are precious and its important to value them as we often dont get a second chance
    Nicely done, tenebrae - this thread, more than any other goes to the core of why I chose this profession (or it chose me; take yer pick...); being able to help those who're going through one of the most momentous & terrifying experiences that the human condition has to offer. In my case (being but a CNA) probably the one thing I have to offer to my charges and their families more than anything else is the simple fact that I went through the process of being my late mother's caregiver between September, 2004 and November, 2008. Hence, I have some insight into all of the nuances of end-of-life care and the unspoken stresses & strains that a person goes through during this time.

    My take is that there really aren't any wrong actions - simply understand that these people are afraid, embarrassed, upset, and that ours is a trusted profession. Honesty and clarity are what these people need (even if they don't necessarily want it); with me I up the ante just a bit by having been there before them. Ask questions; show concern; let them know they're not alone in this. It doesn't really take much - and, the rewards (for the patient, the family, and especially the nurse) are literally incalculable.

    Again, well done.

    ----- Dave
    Tenebrae likes this.


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