New Grads to ICU- your opinion

  1. 0
    Hi-
    I'm doing a paper in grad school on opinions of experienced nurses on new grads starting right into the ICU. (I'm also exploring the cultural differences between the multigenerational nursing staff and how different work ethics affect our ability to get along in the workplace.)
    So I would love to hear your opinions and comments on new grads in the ICU (especially for the gen y nurses) and whether you think it works coming right into ICU. Why or why not?
    Thanks ahead of time for your feedback.
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  3. 11 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    First Q: What's a "gen y nurse" ?

    Hey, if you're a quick learner and hard worker, come on aboard.

    I'll teach 'ya all the tricks I know 'cuz after 15 years, I've just about
    had enough.

    NEXT!

    Last edit by Biffbradford on Jun 7, '12
    whichone'spink likes this.
  5. 0
    I personally started out in a pretty big ICU. It took a little while to actually feel comfortable in there, but you learn SO much SO fast. If you are a good and fast learner, it shouldnt be that hard to be a good nurse quickly. As a matter of fact there are a good amount of ICU nurses who arent the best nurses, to be put lightly. Someone right out of school in the ICU can be taught the RIGHT way to do things the first time, as opposed learning bad habits on med/surg floor. Just because something is more advanced doesn't mean that someone cannot learn it. I picked up on balloon-pumps in a couple of days when I first started. The only major drawback I can think of to having a new grad in the ICU is that they are not familiar with seeing the patterns of illness in certain disease states. But everyone has to start somewhere right? Besides, most new grads in the ICU are watched like hawks by the more knowledgeable nurses. As long as you drill into a newbie's head that they NEED to ask questions if they feel even slightly uncomfortable with something, they probably will do fine.
  6. 0
    emmarin- I am interested to hear your findings, especially considering the multigenerational workplace. I'm thinking about writing my paper for my leadership class about this type of conflict between nurses. We are supposed to write about an issue we saw during our clinicals, and I witnessed division between the clique of younger ICU nurses (those with ~5 years experience, most with their CCRN) and the older nurses on the unit.
  7. 0
    Quote from ktliz
    emmarin- I am interested to hear your findings, especially considering the multigenerational workplace. I'm thinking about writing my paper for my leadership class about this type of conflict between nurses. We are supposed to write about an issue we saw during our clinicals, and I witnessed division between the clique of younger ICU nurses (those with ~5 years experience, most with their CCRN) and the older nurses on the unit.
    See, at my place, there is no clique. When I first got to the ICU, I stuck to the seniors like glue. I learned as much as I could, and shortly after a year, I had my CCRN. I guess it depennds on the type of person the newer people are.
  8. 0
    Please explain what you mean by "cliques", and what went on in these cliques. Personally I feel like a good mix of oldies and newbies can be very resourceful to a unit. Respect is a two way street.
  9. 0
    cubsfan- I believe he is refering to there being seperate groups that stick together in the ICU (more experienced stick together, little experienced stick together) without there being much interaction between the two groups. I definitely agree that there should be a good mix, newbies can bring alot to a unit. Sometimes its because newbies are usually more interested in learning new things, or they have have something new to bring to the table. On the note of the more experienced, I think its evident what they have to offer. I usually dont see any problems with this, most people Ive worked with help each other.
  10. 2
    Many, many hospitals have been very sucsessfully using new grads in high level ICUs for years and years. Some hospitals even prefer them over RNs with years of med-surg experience. When properly trained and supported, motivated new grads can be highly sucsessful. This has been well demonstrated for years.
    That said puting a new grad in the ICU without proper training and support will result in disaster for the nurse and the patients.
    whichone'spink and jkr2020788 like this.
  11. 0
    I have to agree with Biff. There is a lot more to account for than just time "under cap" so to speak. I went straight to the ICU years ago but it was with 13 years of assessment experience from running on the ambulance. There are often times other factors that may make someone a viable candidate to go directly to the ICU. Just as there are nurses who have been nursing for 10+ years who I wouldn't allow near a vent. It's more than just time.
  12. 0
    I am going to sound so snobish.... but I can say that I personally hate it and think that it makes my job fifty times harder.. our ICU takes new grads. I spend three months with the initial training and then everytime their assignment is hard I end up doing theirs and mine for at least two years. I think most of them are well educated but not use to the stress. Fast thinking and of course keeping the MD's inline..lol


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