New RN Grad going to CA Prisons - page 2

Hello everyone, Im starting my classes soon and hope to graduate around 2015. My ultimate passion is to work in the prison system or jail systems in CA... To this date, do they still hire New Grads? I have many friends as... Read More

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    Quote from misspinkmeow
    Hello everyone,

    Im starting my classes soon and hope to graduate around 2015. My ultimate passion is to work in the prison system or jail systems in CA... To this date, do they still hire New Grads?

    I have many friends as CO's in the prisions and wanted to know if that helps getting in as well?

    Is there any externships I can do while in school for me to get into the prison systems?
    I am a DON in a western state, and while I cannot address issues specific to California I can address in part the hiring issue. Honestly, someone going from CNA to RN would not get as much consideration as one going from LPN to RN. A person's work as a CNA would tell me very little about the kind of RN that person would make, because there is too big a discrepancy in duties and responsibilities. I might know you personally and know something about your character and work ethic, but I would have no idea how well you could handle nursing responsibilities from CNA work.

    I have heard that California hires new grads.

    If I were in your spot I would skip the CNA route. Just one man's opinion.

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    Thanks for your input. I have read that I can apply for an LVN license after a few RN classes and start working while in school. Is that a better route?
    Orca likes this.
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    Not sure if you can "challenge" the LVN while in RN school like you can the CNA; at least not in CA. If it is true, however, I'd imagine it not be too far off between the point when you can challenge the LVN to getting your RN. State jobs are hard to get into, because once people do they seem to plant themselves. Will CA prisons hire new grads? Yes, yes they will. I was hired and considered a "new grad" because I have less than 6 months experience at the time of my hire. I met a handful of nurses who were hired from the get go.

    I think that correctional hiring persons take into consideration an applicant's "personality" as a greater weighing factor than other hiring perspectives (hospital). This is mainly because the job not only requires keen nursing skills but the environment and duty itself lends unique challenges. It is an environment that can be (depending on the institution and post you work in within the prison) stressful and full of tension. Regardless of how much one knows about how to operate as a nurse in an emergency situation, it won't work if the person does not have the reserve required to be able to process riots, stabbings, and many other violent situations that tend to precipitate in a prison environment.

    Fact is, the nursing environment in a prison is not pretty. We use out-dated equipment by most standards, rely on our autonomous judgement in most situations, and are expected to change gears from "calm doctor's office" to "first responder to bloody scene" in a drop of a hat. It takes special people to be able to do this, in my opinion. I guess what I am trying to get at is I would worry less about "getting your foot in the door" and more about tailoring your nursing academics/experience to reflect your ability to work autonomously and respond to emergencies. Try and get an emergency dept externship/preceptorship during RN school and sign up for clinic work where you get to use RN critical thinking and RN standing orders to treat patients (occupational health, urgent care) once you get your RN [these are easier to land jobs than acute care/hospital jobs at the moment].

    Good Luck!
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    I worked as a prison nurse for a few years. Just switched to dialysis a few months ago. I started as an Lpn and became an RN. We had multiple Cna who were in nursing school, and they hired them once they became nurses. I suggest if you did get hired as a Cna, that you work hard and get to know the DON, that always helps.
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    Very interesting guys... Thanks for all your input... I also wanted to know if taking a CNA class is better then taking the EMT class?
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    Quote from misspinkmeow
    Thanks for your input. I have read that I can apply for an LVN license after a few RN classes and start working while in school. Is that a better route?
    When I was in nursing school I took PN boards after my third semester. I presume that the same opportunity exists now. At the time I primarily did it to get direct experience with taking a nursing licensure exam. I had no idea I would be using my LPN license, but it allowed me to start orientation at my first job before I passed RN boards. The experience as an LPN would be much more applicable to your future RN duties. A CNA's scope of practice simply doesn't allow it.
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    Quote from misspinkmeow
    Very interesting guys... Thanks for all your input... I also wanted to know if taking a CNA class is better then taking the EMT class?
    Apples and oranges. EMT is emergency medical response, while CNA involves more menial tasks. EMT is not an easy course of study.
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    in my opinion....
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    Go for EMT cert. It will give you an advantage in emergency situations and make you more marketable!
  10. 0
    Sweet thanks


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