Correctional Nursing - page 2

by Wave Watcher 3,840 Views | 11 Comments

Does or has anyone worked as a nurse in a correctional facility/prison? I was interested in your views/experience/advise. I am a female RN and have an opportunity for a position at a correctional facility with approx.... Read More


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    Hi Theresa, Great idea. Would you please let me know what good books you mentioned in your post, please email the titles to my email address coolgeyser@aol.com, thanks.
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    The book mentioned is my fav as well..it is an old book but a great one. I made it "required reading" for my new nurses in corrections. Remember "firm and fair" in dealing with offenders..they understand and respect this approach.

    I used to think it was unwise to hire the very pretty, very young nurses for fear of the attention they would attract..but later found that these nurses are not the ones at the highest risk..it is the nurse who may be of average or less that average attractiveness..the one who was ignored by the boys in high school..the one who has a bad marriage or is single and desperately lonely. Offenders can sniff this out like a blood hound. The 2 nurses I lost were the sweetest, most talented nurses I have had the pleasure to work with. One lost her marriage and children over the affair, the other lost her license and almost lost her life. They, along with many, many correctional officers..both male and female.. were drawn into the offender's web of manipulation, deceit, and abuse. Career offenders look at other humans as a tool, like we do a hammer or a broom, which they toss out when it serves them no further purpose.

    They (the offenders) will assess you when you arrive the first day..(their assessment skills may be superior to ours)..
    If you can establish from day one that you are a confident, no nonsense professional, walk with head held high, look them dead in the eye (never look down..a sign of vulnerability), be polite, but not friendly...the word will spread very fast throughout the facility as "don't bother with that one..she cannot be had". The line I used most successfully when an offender started to try to make friendly chit chat..(but was really fishing for personal info) is this.."My job is to ask the questions..your job is to provide the answers..are we clear on this???...."..and the answer better be a definitive.."yes Ma'am" or the conversation ended right there.

    But..on the upside..corrections is a really good job to establish autonomy in your assessment skills and other nursing skills. A great opportunity to gain insight and knowledge into that part of society most folks never want to think about..ie gang culture, the impact of illiteracy and lack of education on childhood development, etc.

    Keep us posted on your journey..:redpinkhe
    psysn likes this.


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