Insights about Lincoln Technical Institute. Please! - page 2

Hi, I have been following this site for a while, however, this is my first time posting. I am frustrated and sad that I have applied twice to Community Colleges in CT., but both times got into the waiting list. I just got a... Read More

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    Pell covers up to $7500/year. And while it's not "cheap" per se, 1/3 the cost of a private school is certainly significant.

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    Best of luck to you and I can attest that being an LPN does not get you a leg up. Neither does an 89% on TEAS or a 3.6 GPA. But I'm not bitter.

    For the time invested, I'm going to go with Elms to get my BSN. For another 6 months of time invested I will get a BSN instead of an ASN. The LPN doesn't mean much in terms of going on in school however, working as an LPN makes you a LOT more money in the meantime than just getting a CNA certificate. I've made 70k/year as an LPN. That's no small potatoes!
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    Quote from HelenaHandbasket
    Pell covers up to $7500/year. And while it's not "cheap" per se, 1/3 the cost of a private school is certainly significant.
    Pell is $5500 not $7500.
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    Oops! My mistake. Its actually gone up this year to $5600-ish. Either way..its a big help!
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    Quote from Princess Mama
    Good luck to you. I'm going with a private school because it's worth it to me in the end. I'll finish a year sooner then with the state & that's a year of earning $$'s. The thing you need to consider is that there are very few LPN jobs for new grads, very few. I'm lucky & have great connections so I'm pretty confident in my ability to gain employment. Also, as an LPN you still have to apply as a generic ADN student to bridge. It does not give you a leg up.
    Actually it does give you a leg up in getting in, in a sense. With the LPN to RN bridge program you enter the 2nd year nursing classes of the program (you bypass and don't have to take the 1st year nursing classes).

    By entering in the 2nd year you are not competing with all the applicants who are attempting to start nursing school. You are only competing with other LPN's, transfer students and students who have to repeat a 2nd year class. That brings the number of people you are competing with way, way down. By the beginning of the 2nd year, a lot of seats open up due to people failing out, dropping out, withdrawing to transfer somewhere else.

    I'm currently 2 days from finishing the last class of the last semester of my LPN to RN bridge.
    prettymica and TheCommuter like this.
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    Quote from CT Pixie
    Actually it does give you a leg up in getting in, in a sense. With the LPN to RN bridge program you enter the 2nd year nursing classes of the program (you bypass and don't have to take the 1st year nursing classes).

    By entering in the 2nd year you are not competing with all the applicants who are attempting to start nursing school. You are only competing with other LPN's, transfer students and students who have to repeat a 2nd year class. That brings the number of people you are competing with way, way down. By the beginning of the 2nd year, a lot of seats open up due to people failing out, dropping out, withdrawing to transfer somewhere else.

    I'm currently 2 days from finishing the last class of the last semester of my LPN to RN bridge.
    No, at the Community Colleges you have to first apply as a generic ADN student THEN if you are accepted you apply for the LPN bridge. Helena can attest to this procedure. IIRC you are a student @ St. V's which follows different protocol, as does BHSN.
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    I'm fully aware of how the Community Colleges do their LPN to RN bridge, I was going to to the Community College route at first. I have several friends who are LPN's who went through/are going through the Community College process (for what its worth St V's also has LPN apply into the nursing program and we have to meet all the requirements the generic ADN student has to in order to be considered, just as the Community College programs work. And we are not guarenteed a spot in the next upcoming 2nd year class). Some of my friends obtained a seat in the upcoming Fall classes, some did not.

    Being an LPN does not mean instant and 100% positive acceptance, nor did I mean to imply that. What I was trying to get across was the generic ADN student is competing w/hundreds of others for a spot in Nur 101, whereas the LPN (while still having competition) does not have the high amount of people they are competing w/to get into the 2nd year classes.
    JaRoJoCT likes this.
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    Quote from CT Pixie
    I'm fully aware of how the Community Colleges do their LPN to RN bridge, I was going to to the Community College route at first. I have several friends who are LPN's who went through/are going through the Community College process (for what its worth St V's also has LPN apply into the nursing program and we have to meet all the requirements the generic ADN student has to in order to be considered, just as the Community College programs work. And we are not guarenteed a spot in the next upcoming 2nd year class). Some of my friends obtained a seat in the upcoming Fall classes, some did not.

    Being an LPN does not mean instant and 100% positive acceptance, nor did I mean to imply that. What I was trying to get across was the generic ADN student is competing w/hundreds of others for a spot in Nur 101, whereas the LPN (while still having competition) does not have the high amount of people they are competing w/to get into the 2nd year classes.
    I don't understand why you keep saying that LPN's applying to CT-CCNP are not competing against the hundreds of regular applicants, that's exactly who they are competing with. The applications are ranked all together, there is not a separate ranking system for LPN's. If they get a slot(the same slot any applicant can get) then they can ask for advance placement.
     Submit a CT-CCNP application and be admitted to the program (please note, the application
    process does not vary for LPN candidates).
    So while yes, you enter as a 2nd year student, you must first be admitted as a first year student, competing for a slot against all first year students. Which, imo, is a stupid process since you won't be using a first year seat. There should be a separate application process.
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    LPN's that have been admitted to CT CCNP program can either enroll into NU 101 for Fall 2013 start, or take a bridge course at Charter Oak. This is what is says in the letter for accepted LPNs:

    You will have two choices:
    1. Enrolling in all four semesters of the curriculum of your RN program (beginning with NUR*101).
    2. Participating in the statewide LPNto RN Articulation plan in which you will do the following:
    o Enroll in a 3-credit online “bridge” course (NUR190) offered by Charter Oak State College
    (COSC) and coordinated by the Connecticut League for Nursing. Students must attain a final
    grade of 80% (B-) to be eligible to take NUR*130.
    o Your completion of the “Bridge” course in summer 2013 will qualify you for consideration for
    Fast-Track entry into the third semester of the CT-CCNP (pending space& resources). This
    option is currently offered at Gateway, Naugatuck Valley and Three Rivers and at other
    CT-CCNP colleges as resources permit for either the fall 2013 or spring 2014 semesters.
    o Following successful completion of the COSC “Bridge” course, enroll in the 1-credit LPN to RN
    transition course (NUR*130) in the CT-CCNP. Students must be licensed as an LPN in order to
    enroll in NUR*130.
    o Following successful completion of the 1-credit LPN to RN transition course (NUR*130) and the
    award of credit equivalent to the first year of the CT-CCNP, students may enroll in the third
    semester of the CT-CCNP.

    So, Princess Mama, you are right, having your LPN does not really put you ahead. And, if you are accepted and do the bridge course, you still are not guaranteed a spot for the Fall start going into the 3rd semester (skipping the first 2).
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    CT Pixie..how did this work? I am number 18 out of 125 for the waiting list. I applied for LPN to RN bridge. I still had to compete with ALL applicants who wanted in the program, first year or not. AFTER I was accepted, I would be assessed for placement in the LPN to RN bridge. It definitely did NOT give me an advantage at application. Did they make a mistake? Or am I missing something?

    Quote from CT Pixie
    Actually it does give you a leg up in getting in, in a sense. With the LPN to RN bridge program you enter the 2nd year nursing classes of the program (you bypass and don't have to take the 1st year nursing classes).

    By entering in the 2nd year you are not competing with all the applicants who are attempting to start nursing school. You are only competing with other LPN's, transfer students and students who have to repeat a 2nd year class. That brings the number of people you are competing with way, way down. By the beginning of the 2nd year, a lot of seats open up due to people failing out, dropping out, withdrawing to transfer somewhere else.

    I'm currently 2 days from finishing the last class of the last semester of my LPN to RN bridge.


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