Teachers and Nurses create the big one... - page 2

by laborer

4,215 Visits | 19 Comments

American Federation of Teachers and National Federation of Nurses in 5 northerner states come together... www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/14/american-federation-of-teachers-nurses-union_n_2685298.html?view=print&comm_ref=false ... Read More


  1. 5
    I'm a union member in a rehab/LTC facility. Nobody wanted to join until they suddenly fired our nurse manager (despite a clean survey by the DOH) and hired a new nurse manager with a reputation for 'clearing house' and bringing in her own people, which she has done whenever possible. Yup, glad to be in the union now :-)
    GadgetRN71, Sisyphus, tewdles, and 2 others like this.
  2. 7
    Quote from tewdles
    Unions have a place in any employment situation where the employer is not responsive to the needs and well being of the staff. Not all employers are bad and thus, not all work environments benefit from union rep.
    ^This!!! I concur.

    We also have to remember how unions helped shaped how we have set hours...we can't just work ourselves to death, no matter if some facilities out there try to.

    Even if unions are not in every facility, I hope they can move to be a support and a resource for adequate wages, wage increases, cost of living better work conditions, deterrent for workplace violence, discrimination, making work conditions favorable so we there is an opportunity to be able to enjoy the workplace, thus more career enjoyment and less burnout.; as well as improve work-life balance.

    I work somewhere where there is a union. While I'm not a part of it because it is not offered to nurses because of the way our organization classifies us (since we have the ability to be a supervisor) we still have excellent benefits, flexibility, etc. The benefits are pretty lateral across the board. The atmosphere is one of the best I worked in my career.
    smoke over fire, marcopollo, sneeds, and 4 others like this.
  3. 0
    I'm all for Union protection. I want to be an organizer/representative. Where do I sign on
  4. 0
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    It's hard to picture how this benefits the nurses who will be only 2% of the union membership. Nurses and teachers have very different needs in collective bargaining representation and the nurses should not expect attention from the union in excess of their proportion of its membership.

    As a school nurse who works for a large urban district where school nurses are represented by the National Education Association, I can tell you that school nurses and teachers do not have much different needs in having a voice in their working conditions.

    We are there for the benefit of our students. The teachers who I work with understand the need of the school nurse. The school nurses where I work have their own bargaining unit and representation on the bargaining team. The teachers are strong advocates for the school nurses and vice-versa. Teachers can't teach the students if they are not kept safe and healthy. We work together and work well together...and need each other.

    I don't know much about the AFT except that they are a smaller union than the NEA.

    I've never been in a school where it was the "teachers vs the school nurse". If anything, the school nurse is central to the staff and given all of the support possible.
  5. 2
    Quote from HazelLPN
    As a school nurse who works for a large urban district where school nurses are represented by the National Education Association, I can tell you that school nurses and teachers do not have much different needs in having a voice in their working conditions.
    As an RN who has lived with teachers my entire life, including the last 14 with my wife, I can tell you that we have very different needs.

    I will admit, however, that while I thoroughly understand the needs of school teachers and bedside hospital nurses, I do not know much about school nurses. Perhaps a school nurse's role is sufficiently different than bedside nurses that they are better represented as teachers than as nurses.

    For accuracy, I'll also point out that NEA is not a union but rather a professional organization like the ANA and the AMA.

    Most (or all) teachers in California are represented by CTA, the California Teacher's Association which is a labor union.
    marcopollo and herring_RN like this.
  6. 4
    Wish we had a union right now. We might be merging with a larger organization, and boy are we getting scr*wed.. I think that unions are not the reason lazy people keep their jobs. We have no union and have PLENTY of lazy staff. It's more likely that poor policy and ineffectual management keep slackers on board.
    NRSKarenRN, tewdles, Sisyphus, and 1 other like this.
  7. 1
    I really hope these anti-union nurses stick to their principles and leave these union hospitals, post haste so my friends who are pro-union can take those well paying, benefited jobs!
    BlueLightRN likes this.
  8. 1
    I got protection from my union in the one facility I worked at that was unionized. There was no mandatory overtime. We worked well as a team, and we were better able to fight against the changes to our healthcare and PTO that the hospital wanted to make. We had excellent PTO and healthcare benefits that would have been drastically changed had the union not been negotiating on behalf of the nurses.

    However, the union also has drawbacks. We had a nurse who had several disciplinary issues in our ICU. I hated following her because I got shoddy report and was always cleaning up a mess. She missed meds, didn't care properly for the pt, was late for her shift, etc. Regardless of numerous complaints from other staff members, the union protected her and she was never laid off. She was put on probation once and removed promptly when she complained to her union representative. I also have huge moral issues with strikes. I will never go on strike even if I support the union because I have an obligation to my patients. I cannot withhold care in order to obtain or maintain benefits for myself. I would be more likely to search for employment elsewhere if I don't like the new contract.
    herring_RN likes this.
  9. 0
    To me [poor care is just cause to discipline a nurse. It there is no improvement termination may be necessary. Management needs to document facts.

    I know a nurse who had worked pediatrics and PICU. When she came to adult ICU she really didn't notice the subtle signs of deteriorating condition such as tachycardia and hypotension.

    After a near miss incident her first week out of orientation she was written up and suspended. At the second step meeting with management, HR, and the labor representative from the union management agreed to let her transfer back to peds. She was not suspended and no discipline was placed in her record.

    The other option of more orientation with a preceptor was turned down by management.
  10. 1
    Quote from herring_RN
    To me [poor care is just cause to discipline a nurse. It there is no improvement termination may be necessary. Management needs to document facts.
    I agree and think that documentation may have been the issue at my facility. The hospital and union did not work well together...
    herring_RN likes this.


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