Journal-"jotting" your daily rounds? - page 2

by student forever

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Last night I had a "hall and a half' because we were one person under-staffed and no one else would come in. A resident fell and the family found her. I had been in the room 2-3 times and the resident would not be roused for... Read More


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    I agree with you there; I work in skilled nursing so most of my patients are psychologically sound and therefore make numerous requests/demands throughout the day. I call these types total care.

    Sometimes I get people who will do this, because they seem to be under the delusion that they are my only patient:

    2:30 p.m.: Can I have iced tea?
    2:45 p.m.: The tea made me have to pee. Take me to the potty while I tell you a pointless story about how great my moody teenage granddaughters are. By the way I don't want to shower. I just got my hair permed, etc...
    2:55 p.m.: Can you call my daughter and tell her to bring me my pink sweater with the cat on it? No, not the black cat, the yellow one.
    3:30 p.m.: Can I have some yogurt? 2 cups and with blueberries, but it has to be the Dannon kind. By the way I lost my cell phone.
    4:00 p.m.: I don't want to go eat in the dining room.
    4:05 p.m.: Never mind, I want to eat in the dining room. Can I have a shower right now before we go?

    ETC.
    KeepCalmCarryOn likes this.
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    In this particular case, I mean total total care. This is a facility for the developmentally disabled, and of the 17 residents on my wing, only one can walk, and only one can talk. The majority of them have trachs, cerebral palsy, and a variety of other issues. None (except for one) can participate in their care in any capacity, be it positioning, transferring, etc.


    But yes, it's a very different thing than the oriented-ish demanding residents. The upside is that we don't have call lights. The downside is that you don't realize how helpful that those few independent residents you used to have in LTC were, until you literally have to do every single thing for every single person.
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    Quote from nguyency77
    I By the way I lost my cell phone.
    ETC.
    Had to chuckle at this. Last night I had a new hallway and as I did not know the room numbers or names let alone the habits, I went around knocking on each door to introduce myself and get an idea of who was who. One lol's cell phone was broken and I spent I do not know how long with her in the activities center trying to get someone to answer from her long list of family numbers! Finally, you just have to say, "I must attend to others, I'll take you to the front desk."
    Another lady lost her purse, so I went in her room to look high and low. . . never found it, don't know if there was one?

    But I must say the wide variety of persons and their unique care needs is interesting. I pondered on how women have to have every little kleenex, book, glasses, water cup, phone, remote, blinds, curtains, etc in its perfect place before letting you go, and men generally fall in the bed and that's that! We women are complicated creatures aren't we??? YIKES!
    nguyency77 likes this.
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    Quote from yousoldtheworld
    The downside is that you don't realize how helpful that those few independent residents you used to have in LTC were, until you literally have to do every single thing for every single person.
    True! When a person can stand, it is a whole different type of thing. But, on the other hand, when a person can stand, late at night their legs are weak and their feet don't move and toileting can take a new challenging and lengthy aspect. My new hallway last night was the most "able-bodied" group I've had so far, and yet the slowness of every little step and movement of the feet guaranteed that I was still pushing to get all in bed by 9 pm.
    One man is a 3 person transfer because he has girth and is dead weight, absolutely no assistance to stand or move. He gets the shakes for a few minutes after we transfer him because with 3 persons moving him, it frightens him; it seems rather, well, as if we are muscling him, and of course we are! If I recall, he has had a brain tumor.

    No call lights makes perfect sense! No one could use them or know they are there. I have had several who have no need of them also. God Bless your work.
    yousoldtheworld likes this.
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    Quote from student forever
    True! When a person can stand, it is a whole different type of thing. But, on the other hand, when a person can stand, late at night their legs are weak and their feet don't move and toileting can take a new challenging and lengthy aspect. My new hallway last night was the most "able-bodied" group I've had so far, and yet the slowness of every little step and movement of the feet guaranteed that I was still pushing to get all in bed by 9 pm.
    Mmmhmm. On one hand, it's nice when a person can stand, takes the strain off your arms and back a little...but on the other hand, when it feels like it takes a person 5 minutes just to walk 10 feet across the room, it's easy to get impatient and wish you could just pick them up and haul 'em. Plusses and minuses to everything.

    Some nights, after lifting so many residents, some of whom are quite heavy, I miss working in the alzheimer's unit I used to work on...there, the residents had to be able to stand and walk with minimal assistance to be there...then, I remember how time consuming the simplest thing could be simply BECAUSE of their condition, both physical and mental.

    I was thinking about this post today, by the way - I had a new trainee and she was talking about how she was having a hard time remembering who was due to be repositioned/changed/etc. and I suggested that she "journal" it for a couple of days until she got the hang of the routine. Never would have thought of it before.


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