Maternity/OB Clinical Specialist

  1. 0
    I believe that an OB Clin spec is my dream job. My background is in health education, and I will be getting my RN this May. I can then continue to be a NP/CNS in either family, peds, neonate, geriatrics, adult, or acute care.

    I have heard of Perinatal Clinical Nurse specialists, but I am not sure if that is the degree most applicable to OB.

    Does anyone know what degree would directly relate to a Maternity Clinical Nurse Specialist? If not which of the above CNS degrees would you recommend?

    THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!

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  2. 13 Comments...

  3. 0
    Doesn't someone know?? Please help!
  4. 0
    Quote from ER1010
    Doesn't someone know?? Please help!
    Go to slu.edu They have a program for perinatal cns.
    I'd like to do it myself. I just need the $!!!
  5. 0
    I am also curious about perinatal clincal nurse specialist. I am planning to be a certified nurse-midwife and I know what a women's health NP is, where does a perinatal clinical nurse specialist fit in? I really didn't find much from a quick google.
  6. 0
    Mitch,

    My understanding is that the CNS generally is in charge of clinical functioning on a floor. This means making sure the nurses how to use the equipment, doing in service training, helping out with difficult patients, writing policy on the unit, and basically being the clinical expert.
  7. 0
    A perinatal clincal nurse specialist deal with high risk mothers to be. Where the mother and/or the baby are at risk.
  8. 0
    I suggest reading the advanced practice perinatal nursing specialty on UCSF's webpage. It may help you to see what they do.

    http://nurseweb.ucsf.edu/www/spec-pnt.htm
  9. 0
    Just found this thread while browsing.
    I have been a CNS in Maternal-Child Health (mostly OB but inherited Peds a couple of years ago) for 16+ years. I work in a small community hospital, primarily low risk.
    As far as education, I have a Master's in Nursing, specialty certification in Inpatient OB.
    The traditional CNS role incorporates education, consultation, clinical practice and nursing research. Some roles (not mine) also have a management component.

    I am a childbirth educator, teach fetal monitoring, neonatal resuscitation etc.
    I am involved in new staff orientation, competency assessment, development & validation, writing evidence based standards of care and protocols, etc etc. I am called to consult on complicated patient care issues. Also, I am involved with CNS's in other specialty areas as part of nursing leadership.

    Hope that helps.
  10. 0
    Thanks for the info on clinical nurse specialist in Obstetrics. I have been an L&D nurse for 11 yrs with most of it being on high risk units. I will be graduating with a Master's degree/CNM this fall. I am interested in adding CNS but have heard there aren't that many programs for it. I have worked in 6 states and have only really met one nurse who actually had her degree as a CNS. She is my current nurse manager over a l&d dept, but she used to work for perinatology.

    Can someone be a CNS just with a Master's degree in a certain field, or do we have to do extra training?
  11. 0
    I'm bumping this thread because I'm wondering if anyone has some more info for me. I am currently an RN with my associate's degree. I have one year L&D experience. I have decided to go back to school and believe that CNS is the way to go for me, with a focus in Maternal-Child nursing. I live in NC and was looking for some advice about programs. I'm planning on beginning work for my BSN ASAP. Any advice?


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