Question about telling boss I'm applying...

  1. Condensed version of my story: BSN 1990, MN in midwifery 1992, practiced fulltime as CNM until 10/03, went to work in ICU fulltime nights to gain requisite experience to apply to CRNA post-masters programs.
    Problem: Will have been there 6 months when I will need a reference. My manager has barely spoken to me since I have worked there, he seems preoccupied all the time. He really doesn't see me practice because I am on nights. Is he going to be furious when I ask for a reference? How much do I owe this unit for giving me a 3 month orientation? I'll have put in 14 months by the time the first program would start (first choice). Any insight from those who have been in this position? I only spent one year working labor and delivery before I went to grad school, I don't know why this seems different. I did not commit to stay for any length of time, but I will get a sign on bonus if I'm still standing after 6 months, then another at one year (total $3000).
    By the way, working nights is killing me. Totally tangential, but I just had to say it. WHAAA! Thanks.
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   XIGRIS
    Quote from cnmtocrna
    Condensed version of my story: BSN 1990, MN in midwifery 1992, practiced fulltime as CNM until 10/03, went to work in ICU fulltime nights to gain requisite experience to apply to CRNA post-masters programs.
    Problem: Will have been there 6 months when I will need a reference. My manager has barely spoken to me since I have worked there, he seems preoccupied all the time. He really doesn't see me practice because I am on nights. Is he going to be furious when I ask for a reference? How much do I owe this unit for giving me a 3 month orientation? I'll have put in 14 months by the time the first program would start (first choice). Any insight from those who have been in this position? I only spent one year working labor and delivery before I went to grad school, I don't know why this seems different. I did not commit to stay for any length of time, but I will get a sign on bonus if I'm still standing after 6 months, then another at one year (total $3000).
    By the way, working nights is killing me. Totally tangential, but I just had to say it. WHAAA! Thanks.
    Hi,

    I love working nights.....

    Anyway, my manager gave me a good recommendation letter ( or thats what I thought ) for all the 4 schools I applied however, when I told her I am going to go for a CRNA school, she "somewhat" discouraged me. She told me that I may not like it that I am a bedside person ect ect.... anyway she still filled my 4 letters.
    I interviewed to all 4 of them and got in. Then I told her that I may be leaving around May or June and I got the cold shoulder eversince. Even my co-workers are giving me the cold shoulder. I don't understand it. It's either I work understaffed or " hey sorry man you have no on call person tonight." I dont know if Im just paranoid ( oh no ) but oh well, I am just counting the days....
    If in your case your director will not give you a recommendation letter, ask you charge nurse.
    Sorry, I had to say something.....
    Last edit by XIGRIS on Feb 27, '04
  4. by   Baby Catcher
    I think 14 months on a unit is an adequate exchange for a 3 month orientation. I'm curious why you left midwifery. I plan to start a CNM program soon and I was wondering what your life as a midwife was like. There is so much negative stuff in the news about employment right now.
  5. by   susswood
    I had started at a new job prior to applying to CRNA school. I did not tell them. I got my letters of reference from people I had previously worked with who knew me well. Since I found out, I have told them I was going to school, but said that I was going to stay on part-time in the Fall (even though I will actually quit)...I don't want them to give me the cold shoulder or a bad schedule.

    That's what I did....it's working for me so far!

    Good luck....
  6. by   cnmtocrna
    Quote from Baby Catcher
    I think 14 months on a unit is an adequate exchange for a 3 month orientation. I'm curious why you left midwifery. I plan to start a CNM program soon and I was wondering what your life as a midwife was like. There is so much negative stuff in the news about employment right now.
    Baby Catcher...I loved being a midwife most of the time. The hours could be absolutely grueling. My average week was over 50, and some "time off" was spent simply recovering. With each passing year, I saw more patients in a day, and delivered more babies in a year. I left the greatest midwifery job - 8 CNMs, great salary, I was the director, was there 10 years.. I don't regret it(being a midwife), it is an integral part of who I am (I believe some women are natural-born midwives). Managed care and malpractice issues have really put a damper on the profession. We are dispensable to our employing physicians when things get tight. There are currently 5 CNMS working as labor and delivery nurses at the hospital I practiced in. I know of several others in different types of nursing positions, some working as NPs only. Soon after I left my group (big stable HMO), the other large CNM group at the hospital was laid off. Jobs are hard to come by, and good jobs are very rare. My nurse-midwifery program just sent cards out to alumni asking us to help recruit students. When I applied there were 60-70 applicants for 16 slots. They can't even get students!!
    I have worked closely with CRNAs for years and have always admired the profession, and it seems that most are very happy with their jobs.
    The best analogy I have is that it is like a marriage - very much in love for many years, we both grew and changed, and it was simply time to move on. I craved learning something new, I love physiology, pharmacology, being in the O.R. There are many forces, large and small that set forth this huge change for me. It is hard to articulate, but it feels right to me.
    I would never discourage anyone who felt drawn to midwifery from going to school. Nothing would have stopped me, I was 22 and headstrong. I do have concerns about the future for CNMs and the jobs are not plentiful, but that does not mean that you can't find your niche. It IS a challenge to practice "true midwifery" these days. When you have 5 patients in labor at one time, you just cannot be there for everyone, and it is very draining. Women will continue to demand midwifery care, that is the one thing about midwifery that I can say with utter confidence. Thanks for your input, and good luck.
  7. by   cnmtocrna
    [QUOTE=XIGRIS]Hi,

    I love working nights.....

    Xigris, it's great that you got in...congratulations. Your situation at work sounds interesting....it may boil down to human nature, pure and simple. You are getting out and moving on, and there are bound to be people who are jealous. I see the same thing happening to a coworker who will be starting a CRNA program in August. In her case, she is showing overt signs of short-timer's syndrome which doesn't help matters. I too was told that I am too much of a "people person" to go into anesthesia. One person I confided in actually discouraged me, then told me that he planned to go to anesthesia school in the future. People are truely fascinating!!!!

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