figured out my route

  1. I had once posted a question about which route would be best. Either to take my ADN or BSN. Well I had problems with paying for tuition to go on and get my BSN..

    Happy to say that I have finally found out how to do it. I live in Georgia and can go to school and pay instate tuition and get my school paid for with scholarship money. I will only be at the local community college another 3 quarters and then off to the university (work will pay once I am in the program) and apply next spring for the nursing program for next fall. Proud to say that right now I have a 4.0. I am so happy. I have already talked to the university and they have told me that I will have more luck getting in then most of their students because of my GPA..I am so happy. Just wanted to tell everyone that I am on my way.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   smiling_ru
    That's great!
  4. by   Gator,SN
    Good Luck to you! Congrats on the excellent gpa! You must be so proud!

    Gator
  5. by   u-r-sleeepy
    Just a quick note to you - if you're going to school in Georgia... there was some discussion recently on the OldGas group about CRNA schools in Georgia basically - "dumbing down" CRNAs to the level where they are essentially "equal" in knowledge and ability to practice as AAs trained in their schools in Georgia. I can't personally verify this is true as I haven't worked with CRNAs from Georgia trained on those schools, but it IS worth looking into a little further before you decide to accept the route you're planning on.

    This goes back to the whole discussion on AAs and the ASA's plan to really bring them on strong and gradually limit CRNAs scope of practice & $$$. I personally will not work with a group employing AAs and that is one of my questions when I interview right now - "Do you ever see yourself/group looking into employing AAs?"

    Contrary to Tenesma and others - AAs are a threat to CRNAs and yes - it IS all about Control & $$$$! One quick example: A CRNA in (around?) Atlanta recently had her pay cut $20k/yr immediately without any advance notice. Why? The group had just finished hiring their desired # of AAs who will work for much less $$$. She quick and moved onto another place to work, but that should serve as a "wake up call" for many.

    Bottom Line: At least SOME of the programs are not as "thorough" as others. If others know better - please correct this as I'd love to hear another perspective.
  6. by   New CCU RN
    Originally posted by u-r-sleeepy
    Just a quick note to you - if you're going to school in Georgia... there was some discussion recently on the OldGas group about CRNA schools in Georgia basically - "dumbing down" CRNAs to the level where they are essentially "equal" in knowledge and ability to practice as AAs trained in their schools in Georgia. I can't personally verify this is true as I haven't worked with CRNAs from Georgia trained on those schools, but it IS worth looking into a little further before you decide to accept the route you're planning on.

    This goes back to the whole discussion on AAs and the ASA's plan to really bring them on strong and gradually limit CRNAs scope of practice & $$$. I personally will not work with a group employing AAs and that is one of my questions when I interview right now - "Do you ever see yourself/group looking into employing AAs?"

    Contrary to Tenesma and others - AAs are a threat to CRNAs and yes - it IS all about Control & $$$$! One quick example: A CRNA in (around?) Atlanta recently had her pay cut $20k/yr immediately without any advance notice. Why? The group had just finished hiring their desired # of AAs who will work for much less $$$. She quick and moved onto another place to work, but that should serve as a "wake up call" for many.

    Bottom Line: At least SOME of the programs are not as "thorough" as others. If others know better - please correct this as I'd love to hear another perspective.
    I wonder the patient outcomes after the group does such a thing, I am sure that it will be a decrease since the usage of AAs and loss of CRNA's. I am not trying to be gungho CRNA and they can do no wrong, but it seems like AA's to CRNA's are kinda the same as MA's to RN's.... and it;s not a smart move.
  7. by   MICU RN
    I am trying to be objective here, even though I am waiting to find out if I have been accepted to a crna program. I think it is a mistake for crna's to underestimate AA's and to think their curriculum and clinicals are so inferior to crna's. I recently looked at the curriculim for one of the AA programs on line and it looked very science based and seemed to offer plenty of clinical experience. As a matter of fact it seemed more science based than some of the MSN/ANesthesia programs which make you take classes such as nursing fundamentals, nursing management, ect. I also think it is mistake to conclude that just because AA's don't need clinical experience prior to their anesthesia education that they will some how perform worse than crna's. We must remember that to become a medical doctor no prior clinical experience is needed and most turn out well. Now of course the prior experience helps but that cannot be the only thing we hang our hats on when comparing crna's to AA's. We have to focus and show the public what our academic curriculum details and the hands on clinical experience we receive. ANd don't be surprised, if AA's catch on, to see the doctors allowing them the same amount of autonomy as they give crna's so that MDA's can continue to bill and get paid for their services. Some of the comments I read from the nurses on this board concerning the AA's are very similar to the comments I read on the student doctor forum when they are referring to crna's in a very condescending way.
  8. by   New CCU RN
    You make a valid argument. One thing you mentioned about the MD;s though... yes, they don't need clinical experience prior to applying, however, they spend their later years of med school and then 4-7 years of post grad work doing their residency/fellowships getting tons and tons of clinical.

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