Any Navy CRNA's out there? - page 3

Would it in your opinion be better to lt the Navy pay for CRNA school, or would you say it is better to just take the loans?... Read More

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    Quote from lava
    sorry to bring up an old thread but, who would be #1? and don't the air force have CRNA's too? or no?
    Not wanting to cast aspersions, but the USN&WR ranking is not based on any form of objective data. The ratings are based on surveys sent to program directors, not unlike the coaches' polls in football rankings. This ranking was computed in January of the year cited, based on data from a survey sent out in the fall of the previous year. A survey sent to program directors and deans of those programs leaves a lot of room for subjectivity. Since this data was computed in January 2007 gathered from a survey sent in the fall of 2006, it is also less than current. Here is a list taken from the AANA website in 2008 showing the accreditation periods granted to each program. These time frames were based on objective data which included site visits and a thorough review of student case numbers, graduation rates, pass rates, and overall program administration by the COA. I submit that this list (roughly in alphabetical order from the website) has a little more credibility. Also note that the 3 and 4 year accreditation periods may be provisional, given to new schools awaiting their first formal accreditation cycle. In editing, I've added the USNWR rating to schools who received less than a ten year accreditation by the COA.

    10 Years:
    Albany Medical College
    Allegheny Valley
    Baylor
    Boston College
    Bryan LGH
    Carolinas/UNCC
    Cleveland Clinic
    Columbia
    Crozier
    Decatur/Bradley
    Samford
    Drexel
    Duke
    East Carolina
    Evanston/Northwestern
    Excela
    Fairfield/Bridgeport
    Case Western
    Skemp
    LaSalle
    Gooding
    Gannon
    St Raphael’s
    Kaiser
    LSU
    Mayo Clinic
    MUSC
    Memorial/Rhode Island
    Minneapolis
    Mt. Marty
    Navy Nurse Corps
    Nazareth
    New Britain
    Northeastern
    UAB
    Oakland/Beaumont
    Raleigh
    Rush
    St. Mary’s
    Samuel Merritt
    St. Elizabeth’s
    St. John’s
    St. Joseph’s
    TCU
    Akron
    Iowa
    Michigan/Flint
    Tennessee Knoxville
    Tennessee Chattanooga
    Tennessee Memphis
    Truman
    US Army GPAN
    USUHS
    Cincinnati
    Detroit Mercy
    Kansas
    Maryland
    Pitt
    Penn
    North Dakota
    U Southern Cal
    U South Carolina
    UT Houston
    VCU
    Wake Forest
    Wayne State
    Webster
    Wyoming Valley

    8 Years:
    Arkansas State #77
    Barry #78
    Charleston Area MC #42
    Georgetown #7
    Barnes #31
    Middle Tennessee #69
    Newman #65
    Sacred Heart/Spokane #74
    SIU/Edwardsville #82
    Minnesota #49
    U of New England #50

    6 Years:
    Florida International
    MC Georgia #63
    Midwestern
    Old Dominion #56
    Texas Wesleyan
    Trover #74

    4 Years:
    Inter-American
    Florida Hospital
    SUNY Harlem
    Our Lady of Lourdes
    Mountain State
    Michigan State
    Rosalind Franklin
    Union
    SUNY Buffalo #18
    UMD/New Jersey
    U Puerto Rico
    West Carolina
    Wolford
    York #86

    3 Years:
    Thomas Jefferson #73
    U of North Florida
    Florida Gulf Coast
    Mercer #80
    Oregon Health
    Our Lady of the Lake #81
    U of South Florida
    Miami
    Westminster

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  2. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna

    3. Yes, the Navy has a "Completely" autonomous scope of practice. But not to burst anyones bubble that is not the model that is utilized at NNMC. NNMC utilizes the same model as the Army and the AF that requires consultation by CRNAs for ASA 3 and 4 patients no matter what branch you are from. Bethesda has Army, AF, and Navy CRNAs working there and of course in 2011 will become a true tri-service site.
    4. The AF and Army have been working to move to the same scope of practice as the Navy, but it is still comes down to the same thing individual facilities can limit our scope of practice stateside in the military. As I understand it Walter Reed utilizes a supervisory model for their CRNAs which is going to be real interesting when Walter Reed and NNMC combine. Not to mention the fact that SRNAs aren't allowed to do regional at Walter Reed....!

    I know this is an older thread but I was hoping for an update to some of the information posted. I am a Navy Nurse - I love what I do (on most days ). I have been acceppted to the Nurse Anesthesia program and will attend USUHS in Bethesda. I have to submit my "wish list" for the Phase II clinical site and am tied between wanting to stay at Bethesda (NNMC) or go to sunny Jacksonville FL. I wanted to go to NNMC because I have been told that those students do a rotation at Baltimore Shock Trauma = I cannot imagine a better place stateside to learn how to prepare for battlefield trauma. I am concerned about what I have heard about NNMC going to an Army training model and thus less opportunity to learn regional anesthesia. As already mentioned the Navy expects the CRNA's to be able to function independently right out of school and we are immediatly deployable. I want to make sure I am at a clinical site that will provide me the best opportunities.
  3. 0
    Quote from johanna767
    I know this is an older thread but I was hoping for an update to some of the information posted. I am a Navy Nurse - I love what I do (on most days ). I have been acceppted to the Nurse Anesthesia program and will attend USUHS in Bethesda. I have to submit my "wish list" for the Phase II clinical site and am tied between wanting to stay at Bethesda (NNMC) or go to sunny Jacksonville FL. I wanted to go to NNMC because I have been told that those students do a rotation at Baltimore Shock Trauma = I cannot imagine a better place stateside to learn how to prepare for battlefield trauma. I am concerned about what I have heard about NNMC going to an Army training model and thus less opportunity to learn regional anesthesia. As already mentioned the Navy expects the CRNA's to be able to function independently right out of school and we are immediatly deployable. I want to make sure I am at a clinical site that will provide me the best opportunities.
    I personally would steer clear of Bethesda for a few years and see how the integration works out. San Diego sounded like a great clinical site according to my Navy CRNA friends. Baltimore Shock Trauma sounds really cool and interesting, but I didn't think it was that great of a rotation. Most of the really exciting stuff at shock trauma happens in the trauma resuscitation unit/TRU and SRNAs don't usual goto that area.
  4. 0
    Johanna767,

    I was wondering if you'd answer a few questions for me. I am prior Navy of eight years enlisted. I seperated from the Navy to go to nursing school. I want to come back into the Navy as a Nurse and my ultimate goal is to be a Navy CRNA. Should I get my critical care experience before going back in? Should I try to get into CRNA school before the Navy? or should I come striaght in? I'm not sure what the best path would be. I'm definetly coming back in but I want to give myself the best opportunity at reaching my goals. Any advice you could give I'd really appreciate. Congrats on CRNA school!
  5. 0
    Tommy,

    As you have been in the Navy before I am sure you know there is no guarantee that you will be placed into a critical care unit your first year as a Navy Nurse. Just about everyone has to do time in a general ward such as Med-Surg or Mother-Baby before earning a position in a specialized unit. I do know a few nurses who worked in the civilian world and came into the Navy with their 1960's (Critical Care sub-specialty code). Those are the nurses that have the best odds of going straight to a critical care unit. (The rest of us earn our 1960's after working critical care for a year.)

    With that being said, the current DUINS (duty under instruction) rules state you must have completed your first tour before starting school. So you would have to serve about three years before you can apply. The plus to coming back to the Navy right after school is you start working toward that time, earning money and time toward retirement... The downside - you will have to work your way up to Critical care - but that is not such a bad thing, gives you time to develop your nursing skills and you can use TA (tuition assistance) to take any courses you may need for anesthesia school such as biochem. This also gives you time to learn how to be an officer and a good leader - to develop your self so that your FITREPs will speak highly of you. The Navy's Nurse Anesthesia program is competitive, you have to prove you are a good nurse, officer, and student - They look at the whole picture.

    I'm not sure I would go the civilian route for CRNA school if you are planning on coming back to the military. Think of all of those years that could have counted toward retirement... Plus, through the DUINS program, you get free tuition at the Uniformed Services University as well as your full pay, BAS, and BAH - it's a pretty good deal
  6. 0
    johanna,

    thanks so much for your insight! i have been thinking a lot about what you said. it makes complete sense to go active duty and continue the retirement clock let alone full benefits while going to school. my wife is working on her master's in midwifery at wayne state university and i think i'll be done before she finishes. i want to make sure she's done before i commission so there is no worries of her not being able to complete her educational goals. i know i will go where the navy needs me. during this time i will grab a critical care job as a civilian and get my year of experience. after she finishes i'll go active and begin the transition. i totally agree with you about becoming an officer and a nurse. i was enlisted for eight years and got out as an e-6 it has always been my dream since bootcamp to become a naval officer. we used to say, “before you can be a master at arms you first have to be a sailor." i think so many people who come in are so focused on their job, but fail to realize it's more than that. there are tons of young people who look up to you and idealize you as an officer. i know because i was one of them. it is your responsibility as an officer to guide them in a positive way. i know my plate will be full with becoming a good officer and nurse at the same time. it is going to be a whole different ball game as an "o". busy days.
    i agree school shouldn't be until after my first four as a new "butter bar"..lol i will do my time and prove that i am worthy of the navy's investment. i think it also gives me the opportunity to see the different avenues in nursing. i also have an interest in psychiatry nursing and noticed usu has a np program for that. it is an exciting time for me, being so close of achieving my dream. i'll get there. a few more questions i was at bud/s in 2000 and remember san diego being a great town but haven't been back since. is it still a nice place and kid friendly? also what exactly or how involved are psychiatry nurse and nurse practitioner in a military setting? i also didn't see any pre-reqs for crna school other than the one year of acute care. no organic chem? thank you for your guidance and i promise i'll leave you alone after this! thanks again.
  7. 0
    Tommy, I'm not Johanna, but I used to work with her, and I am currently going through the process of applying for the Navy's CRNA program at UHUHS. I am also prior enlisted (I left as a CTI3). So here's how it works. As Johanna says, once you get to your first duty station, you'll be placed where you're most needed - for me, it was Mother Baby Unit, but I have seen others assigned to Psych, MedSurg, even Labor and Delivery. You'll spend your first 12-18 months there getting your nursing skills up to speed and learning time management. After that, if you're lucky and have advocated for yourself, you can usually get transferred to the area you prefer to work, whether it's ICU, PACU, ED, whatever.

    Prerequisites for Nurse Anesthesia are: Statistics (if you haven't taken it as part of your undergrad - I think you have to have taken it within 5 years of applying for USUHS), college level biochemistry (also within five years), a minimum of 1000 combined on the GRE, acceptance to USUHS, and three letters of recommendation (one of them must be from a Navy CRNA). You must have at least a 3.0 GPA from your undergrad, and a minimum of one year experience (although two is preferred) in acute nursing care.

    The people who I have known who have gotten commissioned after having civilian nursing experience have gotten some credit for their nursing experience in terms of rank - one person I knew only had 6 months experience working as an RN (with her BSN - this is important), but the Navy allowed her to promote to O2 after 18 months instead of the 2 years it takes someone with no experience. However, if you work as an RN with an ADN, the Navy does not give you credit for that time.

    Hope this helps.


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