Anesthesia Paper Ideas

  1. Hi all,

    I am looking for ideas to write a paper on a CRNA related issue. It has to be a non-clinical issue and something that impacts CRNA practice ( I would like something other than the AA issue!) Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   jwk
    Quote from TraumaNurse
    Hi all,

    I am looking for ideas to write a paper on a CRNA related issue. I would like something other than the AA issue.
    Thank you!
  4. by   u-r-sleeepy
    Non-clinical? How about the malpractice insurance crisis currently at play in our medical system? There is a lot to write about if you're interested.

    Just a thought -

    Sleeepy
  5. by   athomas91
    or how about the small percentage of the "nursing shortage" money that SRNA's get to help through school and how that compounds the anesthesia provider shortage.....just a thought.
  6. by   u-r-sleeepy
    Quote from athomas91
    or how about the small percentage of the "nursing shortage" money that SRNA's get to help through school and how that compounds the anesthesia provider shortage.....just a thought.
    Hehehehehe!!! I like that thought.

    Perhaps you could do some sort of a "cost comparison" for producing MDAs vs CRNAs? There's plenty to explore there.

    Here's a quote from another CRNA on how things are in Texas. If this is pretty accurate, it just might make you think a bit. Well, that and now include the desire on the A$A's part to gradually "subdue" the "lowly CRNAs" into being dominated by MDAs both in scope of practice and compensation....

    Sleeepy

    I think the figures below are pretty average for anesthesiology
    residencies:

    Salary and Benefits, 2000-2001
    Salary (email for latest changes)
    PGY-1 PGY-2 PGY-3 PGY-4 PGY-5
    Monthly 2,833.33 2,941.66 3,050.00 3,158.33 3,266.66
    Annual 34,000 35,300 36,600 37,900 39,200
    Remember, NO state income tax in Texas!

    Retirement
    UTMB matches the resident's retirement contribution of 6.65% of monthly
    salary with an additional 6%. The resident is fully vested after one year.
    Residents may receive lump sum cash payment, typically around 16,000
    dollars, after four years of residency (may be taxable at that time).
    Fringe Benefits
    Educational Fund of 3,000 dollars during residency: Generally used for, but
    not limited to textbooks, meetings, ABA board examination fee.
    Insurance: All residents are provided with the following:

    Malpractice with a 'tail'
    Health for both the resident and his/her family
    Dental for the resident
    Disability
    Vacation, Sick Leave, Meeting Time
    Vacation: 15 days of paid vacation (3 weeks) per year
    Sick Leave: 12 days per year
    License Examination: Administrative leave may be taken
    Meeting Time: during the PGY-4 year, 5 days (1 week)
    Medical License Renewal or Temporary Institutional Permit Fees: All
    residents must have either an institutional permit or a Texas medical
    license. We reimburse for the renewal fees of the Texas license (300
    dollars/year) or pay annual permit fees.

    Professional Membership Dues: We pay membership dues for the resident to the
    American Society of Anesthesiologists, Texas Society of Anesthesiologists,
    International Anesthesia Research Society, and the Texas Medical
    Association. With these memberships, residents receive two monthly journals,
    Anesthesiology and Anesthesia and Analgesia.

    Equipment

    OR Shoes: reimbursed for up to 100 dollars for OR shoes of the resident's
    choice
    Lab coats, eye protection, ear pieces, name tags, digital pagers are
    provided
    On-call Meal Tickets: 4.50 per in-house call

    So the anesthesiology resudent gets about $200,000 in pay and benefits and
    the SRNA PAYS about $50,000-60,000. Soungs right to me. Where's the AANA?
  7. by   deepz
    Quote from u-r-sleeepy
    ......So the anesthesiology resudent gets about $200,000 in pay and benefits and
    the SRNA PAYS about $50,000-60,000. Soungs right to me. Where's the AANA?

    The AANA seems to always be at the back of the bus, and near the end of the line-up to the trough of Medicare $$. Their figures do say MDAs cost $635,000 to train, versus $59,000 for a CRNA. Doesn't mention what the budget is for donuts.

    deepz
  8. by   sonessrna
    Quote from TraumaNurse
    Hi all,

    I am looking for ideas to write a paper on a CRNA related issue. It has to be a non-clinical issue and something that impacts CRNA practice ( I would like something other than the AA issue!) Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
    There are so many....how about how CRNAs are used in rural settings, the lifting of supervision of CRNAs in certain states (Iowa for example!!!) :hatparty:
  9. by   Gotosleepy
    $200,000 over 4 years (including benefits) that averages out to 50,000/year

    that averages out to $13/hour, and after tax that is about 10-11$/hour. Still amazingly cheap labor, if you ask me. My wife (an ICU nurse) makes 3 times the money per hour and would only work 36hrs/week (compared to my old 80-100hrs/week when i was a resident).

    And the reason why the government continues to provide money (through medicare) is that MDA residents actually make money for the hospitals, and cheapen healthcare for the medicare system.

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