advice about education

  1. i stumbled unto this site attempting bsn/crna school research. i would appreciate anyone's input. i am 33 insurance claims adjsuter who has decided to change careers. my ultimate goal (i think) is to be a crna. that is my smaller problem. my bigger problem is this: i want to enroll in a 2nd bachelor program at UNC-Chapel Hill, but everybody's got me discouraged about my GPA. (it never occured to me that i might not get in!) it is 2.6 for 2 reasons: 1) i had one ****** semester where i discovered business was not my forte 2) my credits from another university transfered, but those grades did not factor into my cummulative GPA. my ? is this: will admissions representatives take the time to actually review my work record, essays, letters of rec, and look thru my transcripts to identify the trend of increasing GPA once i picked the right major.......or will it just GPA, GPA, GPA?

    on the same note: if i am not accepted, should i just go for an rn, instead of getting another year older waiting around to see if i get in next year?

    thanks in advance to anyone nice enough to respond!
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   bigwavedave
    here are my two cents...if you are an insurance claims adjuster currently, then my guess is you probably don't have a biology degree already. that being said, i am figuring you probably do not have all the pre-requisite courses completed needed to apply for a nursing program (i.e. microbiology, anatomy and physiology, chemistry, etc). i may be totally on a different page, but that is just my hunch. if my hunch is true, then when you can take those courses (which would be needed for either a bachelors or associates program) if you can make some good grades then that could bring the gpa up and make you look like a much better candidate. however, if i am wrong and you have already taken those courses, then, not to be of discouragement, but you are definitely at a distinct disadvantage w/a gpa of 2.6. unless you have some kind of medical field experience. so i guess it all depends. from my experience, my program is pretty competitive, especially for the female applicants and gpa is a pretty big deal.
    to answer your second question...i assume you are referring to an associates program where you won't get your bsn but you can still take the boards exam to get your rn licensure? it is kind of the same story there. my suggestion is, take the science courses if you have not already, kick tail and make some good grades. then, apply for any program that is accessible to you. if you end up in an associates program, upon completion of that, you can go back while you work (aka get paid to do what you will do in nursing school) and earn your bachelor's degree simultaneously. sorry this is lengthy, i hope it helps though!
  4. by   letty1
    thanks bigwavedave. you are correct about the pre-reqs. i am, in fact, currently enorlled (start 08/21/003) @ my local cc in ant & phys I and Micro. i will take the other pre-reqs next semester. i was planning to get a 4.0, but i dont know if those grades too will be disregarded as my other transfer grades were. i do have some medical training. i just returned from army training as a combat medic and EMT-B, where i was 14th out of a class of 360. do you think this will help? thanks!
  5. by   PJMommy
    I was in a similar situation. I was 33 (34 now) in a totally non-medical profession, holding a B.S. degree and a 2.8 GPA. Let's just say I'm a little more focused and goal-oriented now than I was when I was 18! I did exactly what "bigwavedave" suggests to you. I took all my prereqs at a CC, kicked butt and managed a 4.0 with those. This definitely shows admissions people that you've "grown" a bit.

    I'm now in an accelerated B.S.N. program (which is also an option for you if you have a bachelors already). I have one semester left and, unless my life falls apart before finals in two weeks, I should still be maintaining my 4.0.

    Re: your Army training, I'm sure it will be a bonus to your consideration. Oh, and by the way, when I contacted the university I'm currently attending, they also told me my 2.9 undergrad GPA was discouraging. However....when they ran the GPA for prereqs, then there was no problem. So, if you can figure out and slide in your "new" applicable prereq GPA (all the math, science, english, etc. that they want for admission) this may help also. I was able to show that, not only were recent prereq grades at a 4.0, but that the "old" classes that mattered (i.e. math, english, chemistry) were all great grades also. It put a different spin on the picture and suddenly the fact that I got D's in classes like "Music Theory for Non-Majors" 15 years ago was not such a big deal.

    Furthermore, I'd suggest going in and talking to the dean of academics in the nursing school...or someone similar. Set an appointment and go visit -- now they know your face, know your name and know you are (hopefully...ha ha) an articulate, intelligent person and not just a piece of paper with a 2.6 GPA.

    I wish you the very best of luck!! PM me if you have any questions.
  6. by   EmeraldNYL
    I got accepted to my accelerated BSN program with a 2.85 GPA. I think my program required a minumum 2.75 GPA for acceptance to the program. Just do really well on your pre-reqs and kick some butt in your nursing program and this will help your application to CRNA school.
  7. by   gaspassah
    here ya go.
    i flunked out of college the first time. electrical engineering but got a dual masters in sorority girls and budweiser.
    took a few classes a year later failed bible theory (dont ask) but made an a in biology.
    decided a few years later to go back to nursing school. pre req's were 3.5 or better. nursing school (adn) 2.5.
    bsn pre req's 3 a's 1b
    bsn 4.0
    the school i applied said they were really focusing on statistics and your last 60 hours. whew. relief.
    and i got in the first time i applied.
    i think they can see potential, do you exhibit confidence with humility. do they think they can get along with you for the next 24 to 36 months. are you clinically proficient and knowledgable.
    just bust your hump, focus, apply and roll the dice. and wear a nice tie.
  8. by   Passin' Gas
    gaspassah is a real example of why some, if not most nurse anesthesia programs look at more than the overall gpa. The last 60 hours and science grades are calculated by many programs. This takes into account those who start off in electrical engineering and end up in sorority girls and budweiser . Science grades are a big determinant especially for the science-based (i.e. non-nursing degree) nurse anesthesia programs.

    Good luck with your endeavors!

    PG
  9. by   GalaMar
    Letty1, I was in the same boat as you - 2 years ago, @ 30 y/o, I went back to school for my 2nd bachelor's degree, in nursing, & had a mediocre GPA going in - I agree with what everyone has said on this thread. You are on the right track with taking your prereqs at your CC. Just kick a*s on those exams, & the admissions committee WILL absolutely take your growth as a student & as a person into account. Definitely speak to an advisor from the program - they are usually very nice & will certainly tell you where you stand in terms of your chance of admission.

    Once you start your program, just be prepared to work your tail off... esp. if it's an accelerated BSN program...It's much more rigorous than I anticipated! (I must admit, the energy level was definitely NOT what is was at 18!! :chuckle That's one thing I envied about my fellow classmates!) However, I survived nursing school & so will you. As long as the drive is there, you'll make it. GOOD LUCK! :wink2:
  10. by   letty1
    thanks for all the good advice!!!! it sounds like i am on the right track. i will definately meet with an advisor from the bsn program to show my current potential as a student. i'll keep ya posted.
  11. by   purplemania
    Why don't you talk to an advisor? Remember, the school is trying to sell tuition. If they require you to have a higher GPA, then ask how can I get it quickly. If they don't require it, or put you on probation for a semester, then you have saved time and money. Go into the meeting with a plan---shows responsibility. Don't make excuses, that is childish. Just say that was then, this is now and I want to succeed and need your help.
  12. by   letty1
    thanks purplemania for the advice!

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