CPR question - page 3

by Sand_Dollar 6,018 Views | 28 Comments

Hi there! I am a student and was on the CVCU last week. I saw my first code and noticed the doctor doing compressions was going at least twice as fast as I thought we were supposed to (had the song Staying Alive going through... Read More


  1. 0
    you need to remember that juries are not medical persons..If the lawyer can get an "expert" to say the person would have been saved by appropriate care....
  2. 1
    Quote from morte
    you need to remember that juries are not medical persons..If the lawyer can get an "expert" to say the person would have been saved by appropriate care....
    That's true of EVERYTHING. The other lawyer then gets an expert to say, "THEY WERE DEAD."

    I'm not going to practice in fear of a lawyer being able to find an expert that will say anything. An expert can go and tell a jury I gave a toddler liver failure from one dose of tylenol. I'm still going to give tylenol the next time I go to work.
    Altra likes this.
  3. 0
    I work in open heart recovery. We had a post-op valve code one evening and the surgeon advised us to do compressions at a rate that kept the patient's systolic BP in the 70s per the arterial line. However, I don't quite remember the exact rationale for this.
  4. 0
    Quote from wooh
    Considering the patient was DEAD before compressions were started...
    The pt recovered from the code and later passed of internal injuries I believe... I definitely see where you're coming from as the pt is definitely dead without the compressions but having the pt come up off the bed may be a bit excessive.
  5. 1
    Quote from andi.w
    I work in open heart recovery. We had a post-op valve code one evening and the surgeon advised us to do compressions at a rate that kept the patient's systolic BP in the 70s per the arterial line. However, I don't quite remember the exact rationale for this.
    Heart Surgeons tend to have a way of ignoring other systems in the body... I'm guessing it has something to do with not wanting to cause trauma to the valve, surgical incisions etc. but a sbp of 70 and the compressions that are providing it are likely not adequate for cerebral perfusion.
    Altra likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from andi.w
    I work in open heart recovery. We had a post-op valve code one evening and the surgeon advised us to do compressions at a rate that kept the patient's systolic BP in the 70s per the arterial line. However, I don't quite remember the exact rationale for this.
    Thats because there isn't one. The patients brain is literally dying rapidly during a code so trying to limit the blood pressure and perfusion is just silly. I can see not being over the top aggressive with compressions but anything else doesnt make sense
  7. 0
    Quote from Do-over
    I have never seen a physician do chest compressions... but I admittedly don't get out much. I'd rather they give orders and stuff. Maybe start a central line.
    I have not only seen docs doing compressions, but they have raised the legs up also when BP was low. And the ones that had performed compressions, they also were the surgeon who did the surgery. No residents here!
  8. 1
    Quote from Dodongo
    We use the ArcticSun machine to initiate and carry out our hypothermia protocol. We do it for most all of our cardiac arrests. It's quite nice. It uses a core temp probe and circulates cold water through blankets on the skin and then cold saline infusing. The machine adjusts everything to keep the temp at goal and the cooling and rewarming controlled and gradual.
    We just got those. Very cool machines. Pun intended
    turnforthenurseRN likes this.
  9. 0
    Several recent studies, document rates between 150 and 200 chest compressions. Survival starts to drop as compression rates get greater than 120. So 100-120 is optimal.


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