Attn: Cath Lab RN's. (A bit long.)

  1. Okay, so here's the thing. I currently work as a CNA on MS and have been there since January. I'm pretty burnt out and feel like it's time to try something new. I am in school to become a surg tech and then I want to become an RN...and I'm stuck as to whether I want to specialize in Trauma, Cardiac, ICU, or OR...probably OR.

    I was looking on the job postings where I work and they have an opening for a Cath Lab Attendant. I have a few questions on that note...

    1. Does anyone know what a "cath lab attendant" does? If they are utitilized at your facility, are they simply there to transport patients?

    2. Any of you who have done rotations in the OR...is the Cath Lab similar at all?

    3. Do you feel, in your experience, it would just be more beneficial to me to keep working M/S until I graduate?

    I would also like to add that I am not doing this to "put off" nursing school or as stepping stones to becoming an RN. If at this time I were able to devote myself and attend school to become a nurse, I would. But that will have to wait about another year.

    Thanks for your time.
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   dianah
    I don't know what a Cath Lab Attendant does.
    The Labs I've worked in were all small (1-2 rooms) and we didn't have one.
    As you said, probably help transport.
    Maybe help with set-up?
    Inventory??
    Suggest you contact the Cath Lab Manager and inquire about the duties and responsibilities in that Lab (I suspect they may vary from Lab to Lab).

    Good luck!
  4. by   JaredCNA
    Thanks. That is what I plan to do. My thing is, if 99% of the time I'd be transporting but 1% of the time I'd be helping w/ procedures (which I what I want to do) the Cath Lab Manager will probably say "Ohh nooo, it's not all transport, you'll get to see a lot and learn a lot."

    You know how management can be. I don't want to get roped into this thinking it we be a good experience. I was a transport tech when I was 15.
  5. by   dianah
    Ask: How many rooms do they run and what is the average (and low-high spread) case load per room per day?
    Those answers may give you an idea of how often you'd be transporting.
    In all the Labs I've worked, the RNs always transported after the case, d/t the fact the pt. had the "fresh" arterial puncture site.

    Is there a current Cath Lab Attendant you could question re: advertised duties cf reality??
    Or, do you know any of the Cath Lab staff, to ask them (not mgmt, but those "in the trenches")?
  6. by   JaredCNA
    Quote from dianah
    Ask: How many rooms do they run and what is the average (and low-high spread) case load per room per day?
    Those answers may give you an idea of how often you'd be transporting.
    In all the Labs I've worked, the RNs always transported after the case, d/t the fact the pt. had the "fresh" arterial puncture site.

    Is there a current Cath Lab Attendant you could question re: advertised duties cf reality??
    Or, do you know any of the Cath Lab staff, to ask them (not mgmt, but those "in the trenches")?
    Excellent questions. I will def. keep those in mind.

    No, I don't know any of the staff in the Cath Lab. I'm gonna keep asking around though and maybe I can find out from someone who knows someone who works down there.
  7. by   BlondieRN09
    Quote from dianah
    Is there a current Cath Lab Attendant you could question re: advertised duties cf reality??
    Excellent suggestion - I was going to suggest the same.
  8. by   JaredCNA
    Thanks everyone for the advice.

    Per an E-Mail from the Cath Lab Manager:

    "The Cath Lab Attendant will need to learn to pull shealths and hold pressure, as well as run the ACT test.

    The hours will be 0800-1630, Monday through Friday with some overtime to pull shealths. No weekends. No call.

    5 cases per room."

    This sounds pretty good to me.
  9. by   MIRockstarRN
    interesting... where i work we require 2 RN's to pull sheaths. Seems scary to me to let unlicensed personal pull lines

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